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Multitool TLC 45061

Admin Team Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 23,280
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #30 on: June 17, 2007, 09:07:22 PM »
Bob I think Spoonrobots post (5th one down on the second page) of doing that job should be repeated in this thread Bob, could you not make it happen.

Dave

Good idea Dave. Here is a reprint of Spoonrobot's Total Tool Makeover:

...Anyway, after a week that was way too long with too little sleep and not enough money I finally settled down this morning and decided my plan of attack. Since the tool only cost me a dollar I decided to go the cheap route and use only what I had one hand. Starting as small as possible I set up a cleaning station with a green scrubbie pad, some fast orange hand cleaner left over from my alternator replacement, some bleach and some hot hot water. I added the bleach due to the fact that while showing my coworkers the tool and soliciting advice from them one of them remarked that it was indeed covered in rust but there may have been a large amount of dried blood in there also. He came to this conclusion after smelling the tool and scraping some flakes off. Being no forensic expert I figured the bleach would take care of any nonsense left on the tool.

The green scrubbie and fast orange actually took most of the surface rust off and after a thorough cleaning I put the wire wheel on my dremel and cleaned up the really stubborn parts. After everything was clean I checked the function and found the wire cutters were boogered up so much it was seizing the plier heads when closed so I ground down the sides of the cutters to flat and fixed that problem. The awl was pretty trashed too so I polished it and reground the edge, function back to 100%. After all this the only other glaring problem was the twisted small flathead screwdriver, again I ground the edge back to usefulness and began reassembling.

supratentorial- thanks for the excellent picture of the washer placement. Somehow I either lost one washer or there were only two to begin with but I ended up installing two of them correctly and leaving out the one that went between the handle and the large flathead. I haven't really noticed any problems with this arrangement.

After totally reassembling the I checked everything for function, tightened and oiled the pivots and sat outside with a contemplative cigarette while studying my cleaning skills. Overall I am very happy with how this came out, thanks for everyone who chimed in with a comment. I figure I took this tool pretty close to brand new function, the everything that it supposed to be tight is tight and everything that should be loose is loose. No more bali-song-like handles for me!

It really is a pretty good testament to the staying power of a good multi-tool. Essentially junked prior to this at maybe 30% functionality, I invested less than 2 hours in creating a fully functional tool. Awesome!  :grin:

The good stuff:








Take a look at that last picture. Notice the two holes in the pivot of the pliers and the general damage to the circumference? What's up with that?

The holes go fairly deep into the pivot, how in the world could two holes appear there? Is this a pattern of rust? This side of the tool did appear to be lying in some liquid because most of the outside corrosion was on this side. How odd.

This as a very satisfying project, I carried the tool today and have a real appreciation of it. I did some things I have been putting off doing because I didn't want to walk all the way back to the toolbox when I am reminded of the problem:
+Tightened the doorknob screws to both employee and customer bathrooms.
+Filed down the sharp edges of both our ticket holders (the edges were probably sharper than our knives and continually gave me and the Sous Chef annoying cuts).
+Adjusted and fixed the magnetic sensor on the door of our dishwasher.
+Offered to cut any piece of metal anyone wanted because *I* had a metal saw and no one else did.  :D
+Cut a small nail sticking out of the wall when no one was looking because no one actually wanted me to cut anything.
+Measured everything; my hair is 3.6 inches long, this mint leaf is .75 inches wide, your steak is 7.8cm thick, you spilled some sauce and made a puddle 17.3cm wide, eventually the head Chef told me to go measure how close I was to getting fired if I kept it up.

I have a new love for this thing, it's small and unobtrusive but really packed with tools, something that most multi-makers are getting away from today with their bigger/better tools. I plan to add it to my work EDC since I stopped carrying a multi-tool at one of my jobs because weight was an issue.

Now all I need is a junked up PST-II!

(originally posted by Spoonrobot)

In order to be certain of having the right tool for every job.........one must first acquire a lot of tools
Admin Team Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 23,280
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #31 on: June 17, 2007, 09:10:02 PM »
Man-o-man, what an overhaul!

Anybody else got some useful tips for revitalizing a code blue multitool?

In order to be certain of having the right tool for every job.........one must first acquire a lot of tools
Sr. Member Posts: 422
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #32 on: June 17, 2007, 10:06:04 PM »
I have admired that post since he first posted it. It goes to show that even a tool in the state that was in can be retrieved if you put some TLC into it. It also shows that a bit of surface rust is not the frightening thing some folks seem to have about it, that was in a very bad condition but it only had the 2 small pits when Spoonrobot had finished with it. With his care and attention it should now last for years.

Dave
No Life Club Posts: 3,717
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #33 on: December 04, 2007, 09:45:17 AM »
Been at this site less than a week and already seen half a dozen mentions of using WD-40 to care for tools.

I suppose I can't hold it against Americans to use an American product, but the real stuff, the good stuff, the stuff they (should of) used in 'nam is Inox.

http://www.inox-mx3.com/inox.htm

MX4 and MX5 are the Anti-Corrosion Champs of the lot.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2007, 11:03:03 AM by Nomad »
Head Turd Polisher Administrator He who has the most nuts, wins! Posts: 57,805 Optimum instrumentum est inter aures
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #34 on: December 04, 2007, 02:03:23 PM »
I mentioned INOX in my Care and Feeding for SAKs, and while I do appreciate it, I have found little benefit for regular maintenance over regular mineral oil, available at any grocery or pharmaceutical store.  The penetrating compound that was added to the mineral oil to make it INOX is nice on older tools that are stiff due to corrosion or an accumulation of crap, but with mineral oil being so much more readily available (and cheaper!) I don't go through a lot of INOX.

I do like that it's food safe though- that's always a bonus point. 

Overall I try not to use oils for lubrication because of the increased amount of stickiness they create, and allow more nasty stuff to gather in moving joints.  If a lube is needed for everyday carry (as opposed to restoring mobility to an old/abused tool) then I usually opt for powdered graphite, available at any locksmith or hardware store simply because pocket lint, dust etc won't stick to it.

Def

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No Life Club Posts: 1,954 Marsh-wiggle
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #35 on: December 04, 2007, 09:52:41 PM »
Hey Def, I just did a google on powdered graphite (I haven't used it before), and saw that one site claims that:

"Graphite powder, although it is an excellent dry lubricant, has been shown to be corrosive to aluminum when there is possibility of moisture being present."

Has anyone used this with any tools that have aluminum scales? And has it been "corrosive"?
Just wondering...

http://graflex.org/speed-graphic/lubricants.html
Head Turd Polisher Administrator He who has the most nuts, wins! Posts: 57,805 Optimum instrumentum est inter aures
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #36 on: December 04, 2007, 11:59:47 PM »
I can't say as I've ever noticed it, and I have used it on SAKs.  The liners of SAKs are aluminum and I've never had a problem, which is odd because there is so much moisture in the air here steels rust pretty quick.

Def

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No Life Club Posts: 1,954 Marsh-wiggle
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #37 on: December 05, 2007, 12:15:28 AM »
I can't say as I've ever noticed it, and I have used it on SAKs.  The liners of SAKs are aluminum and I've never had a problem, which is odd because there is so much moisture in the air here steels rust pretty quick.

Def
Hmmmm.... Well, good to hear. :)
Head Turd Polisher Administrator He who has the most nuts, wins! Posts: 57,805 Optimum instrumentum est inter aures
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #38 on: December 05, 2007, 12:19:32 AM »
You have me curios now though- I think I may have to devise a devious experiment!

 >:D

Def

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No Life Club Posts: 1,954 Marsh-wiggle
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #39 on: December 05, 2007, 12:20:37 AM »
You have me curios now though- I think I may have to devise a devious experiment!

 >:D

Def
You always were a wild one Def! What do you have in mind?
Head Turd Polisher Administrator He who has the most nuts, wins! Posts: 57,805 Optimum instrumentum est inter aures
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #40 on: December 05, 2007, 02:03:58 AM »
I dunno... thinking about graphite powder, a few aluminum rods I have, and maybe leaving them out on the deck for a month or so.  Some time lapse type shutterbuggery...

Or instead of the rods I have a few old SAK liners laying about. 

Def

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Head Turd Polisher Administrator He who has the most nuts, wins! Posts: 57,805 Optimum instrumentum est inter aures
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #41 on: December 06, 2007, 04:22:58 PM »
I got a fresh tube of graphite today, and the gentleman at the locksmith shop I bought it from has never heard of reactions with aluminum either, and considering the moisture/humidity in Nova Scotia, a locksmith would likely have seen it if it was there!

Of course, aluminum is too soft to normally be used in locks, so I will test it on an old SAK liner I have lying around. I'll polish and clean it up first, then take some "before" pictures. 

Given that very few multitools have aluminum in them I think the SAK liner is the best candidate for this test, especially considering the most prominent aluminum multis are anodized for protection, and the aluminum isn't structural, so any corrosion wouldn't be worth worrying about.

Def

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No Life Club Posts: 1,954 Marsh-wiggle
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #42 on: December 06, 2007, 10:51:19 PM »
Sounds like a good test! :)
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,572
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #43 on: December 24, 2007, 03:48:44 AM »
THE WAY I GET RUST OFF KNIVES AND TOOLS

I get a plastic cup.. Then put in some white wine vinegar.. Then put a few tablespoons of baking powder in the vinegar.. Then get a Q-Tip and dip the desired end into the solution and apply directly to the rust.. Will come off immediately!

B
No Life Club Posts: 1,064
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #44 on: December 26, 2007, 04:00:00 AM »
My tools don't rust, LM123.  8)



Just funning.  ;)

[
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,572
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #45 on: December 26, 2007, 04:13:01 AM »
O haha: no LM's! But I really never had a problem with rust but only on my knives.. Like the high carbon ones

B
No Life Club Posts: 3,717
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #46 on: January 28, 2008, 05:42:05 AM »
Customer come in with Charge asking for a service - all rusty and messy (easy to solve), also FULL OF SAND!

Best way to get sand out?

I was thinking compressed air, but it is in pretty good, all under the scales. No blades move without making gritty sounds  ??? ???
Admin Team Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 23,280
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #47 on: January 28, 2008, 05:46:15 AM »
Customer come in with Charge asking for a service - all rusty and messy (easy to solve), also FULL OF SAND!

Best way to get sand out?

I was thinking compressed air, but it is in pretty good, all under the scales. No blades move without making gritty sounds  ??? ???

Ugh! Sand is the WORST enemy of a multitool. :(  Best would be a total disassembly and a good cleaning. If that ain't practical, go with the compressed air and pray.

In order to be certain of having the right tool for every job.........one must first acquire a lot of tools
No Life Club Posts: 3,717
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #48 on: January 28, 2008, 06:42:54 AM »
Time to dig up my Security bits and have a hot date with a Charge then!
No Life Club Posts: 3,717
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #49 on: January 28, 2008, 09:36:07 AM »
I'm almost as bad as Dubya Dawg, with this double posting.


My Security (well not *my*, some I borrowed) bits didn't fit -
It's possible they were just rubbish bits, and not accurate enough to actually work - or is it possible that Yuessayans use a different size security bit?
Hero Member Posts: 846 "Southbound Whatchya Leave Behind Ya?"
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #50 on: January 28, 2008, 03:35:16 PM »
I know when I still ran over the road.I would put some diesel in a can,then soak my Multi once and awhile,then wipe down and WD it up.It seemed to keep the junk out,and the fuel was always available.

Dtrain

"It seemed Like a Good Idea at the Time"
Admin Team Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 10,299 Aggressive in defence
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #51 on: January 28, 2008, 04:52:30 PM »
I'm always getting sand in my tools  ::)  I use compressed air . Not talking about the stuff in a can but a proper compresor. The I use a little brush ( like what you get with an electric razor , or a tooth brush ) , I also use bluetack http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blu-tack  . Just push it in all the hard to get places on your multitool and when you pull it out all the crap comes with it . It really does work and you can get right into the really hard to get places . Then its a good scrub with soap and water ( I find washing up liquid best ) and make sure you open and close all the tools several times under water , a rinse then dryed with a hair dryer . Any grains of sand left in the tool you should be able to get out with the blue tack and brush .Lastley a drop of oil .

Dunc
Hero Member Posts: 910
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #52 on: January 28, 2008, 06:31:40 PM »
I use LPS #2 on my LM Core. I use pure mineral oil on my CRKT M21-14 because I may use it for food prep.

Splat
No Life Club Posts: 1,895
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #53 on: February 21, 2008, 09:46:31 AM »
I learned this the first week I worked in a restaurant several years ago but just wanted to clarify since it appears I have forgotten.

When cleaning a tool avoid the Green Scouring Pads seen below. They actually scratch the metal and visibly destroy the finish as well as creating an environment that is more conducive to rust.

I used the pads on the PST mentioned earlier in this thread and never noticed because the tool was so used but after scrubbing down a SuperTool and seeing the damage created by the pads I must correct myself.

One should only use stainless steel or copper scrubbers to clean the rust/grime from tools. They work well in conjuction with dishsoap and are easy on the finish but tough on rust.



Tip#2: Toothpaste scrubbed into the pivot points of a used tool with a toothbrush will get rid of the "gummy" feeling that comes from years of use and old 3-in-1 oil. Be careful using this method on riveted and new tools since it is easy to go to far and create loose pivots.
No Life Club Posts: 3,717
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #54 on: February 22, 2008, 09:00:44 AM »
I use nothing more abrasive than Cotton for cleaning of tools & knives - I rely on whatever compound is in use to remove crap.
No Life Club Posts: 2,026
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #55 on: April 12, 2008, 09:18:52 PM »
WD40 in a pressurized can,fine brush,and Q-tips works for most crud.
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,883
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #56 on: June 17, 2008, 10:58:59 PM »
Def, whatever happened to the graphite/aluminum experiment?

- Terry

Burn the land and boil the sea, you can't take the sky from me...
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,883
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #57 on: June 17, 2008, 10:59:14 PM »
Def, what ever happened to the graphite/aluminum experiment?

- Terry

Burn the land and boil the sea, you can't take the sky from me...
Head Turd Polisher Administrator He who has the most nuts, wins! Posts: 57,805 Optimum instrumentum est inter aures
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #58 on: July 08, 2008, 06:52:58 PM »
Is there an echo in here? :P

Absolutely nothing happened.  I don't have any pictures of the arrangement I had set up, but basically I had an aluminum liner on a plate, inside a Rubbermaid cake thing- the kind used for transporting cakes.  I put water in the inverted Rubbermaid lid, put the plate in the center (the plate kept the scale from actually being in the water), then put the graphite all over the scale.  I had even scuffed the scale somewhat to make sure if there was any coating on it, the aluminum would be exposed.  I then put the clear lid over the whole thing and let it sit in my kitchen, where the temperature varies greatly depending on the time of day, or whether I am cooking anything.  I figured different temps might have different effects.

After about six weeks I gave up on it and cleaned the mess up- the liner had no issues whatsoever.

Def

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No Life Club Posts: 1,549
Re: Multitool TLC
« Reply #59 on: July 13, 2008, 07:20:57 PM »
Reading the TLC thread, it seems there are 4 schools of camp when it comes to lubricating multitools:

1) WD-40
2) Various oils, like 3-in -1, gun oils, etc. either all over on just on joints
3) Mineral oil and Inox on joints
4) Nothing

I don't know anything about this stuff, but I was instinctively leaning toward nothing, and perhaps using mineral oil or graphite only if the joints became stiff. (That graphite is amazing stuff. I was a convert the first time it miraculously repaired a completely frozen lock with a small squirt.)

Anyway, the majority seem to favour WD-40 or oil of some sort. Is coating the entire tool really necessary? Doesn't it make it greasy and slippery?

[

 

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