Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
+-

Hello Lurker! Remove this ad by logging in.


A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller. 12941

No Life Club Posts: 4,525 Don't judge a tool by it's brand
A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« on: September 30, 2013, 03:28:21 PM »
I was thinking, in spirit of the "guide to the international trader"-topic, I thought it'd be a good idea to have a thread where knife-carrying laws of all countries are put together.


(Mods, if this thread already exists, don't be afraid to close this one ;) )


DISCLAIMER: this thread is not meant to be bashing local knife laws, just purely informational! :police:


(If a mod can put a link to each country/state/city here, it could become an awesome encyclopedia-thingy)


The Netherlands
United Kingdom
« Last Edit: September 30, 2013, 06:07:05 PM by bmot »



A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller. : http://forum.multitool.or...ex.php/topic,47532.0.html

I feel more awesome than an awesome possum 8)
No Life Club Posts: 4,525 Don't judge a tool by it's brand
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2013, 03:32:21 PM »
The Netherlands (or Holland, for some people :facepalm: ):

In the Dutch weapon-laws, there are two categories talking about knives. Any knife that doesn't fall into one of these categories is legal to own and carry.


Category 1:
Knives and weapons in this category are illegal (without a permit). This means you can't have them in your possession or trade them.

Knives that fall into this category are:
- Automatic knives
- Balisongs
- Folding knives with a total length greater than 28cm (11.02 inch)
- Folding knives of which the blade has more than 1 cutting edge (a saw also counts as a cutting edge here)
- Ballistic knives
- Weapons that like something else than a weapon
- Arrows and arrowheads, made to be fired by a bow, and having sharp parts, apparently designed to be used to induce an injury.

Category 4:
Knives in this category are legal to have, and to trade, but you can't carry them. That means: during transport, they should be packed in a way you don't have immediate access to them.

Knives in this category are:
- Knives of which the blade has more than one cutting edge, as far as it doesn't fall in category 1. (Again, a saw on the back of a fixed blade also counts as a second cutting edge)
- Rapiers, swords, sabers and bayonets
- Objects from which can be assumed that they're not meant for anything else than causing injuries at persons, or threatening, taking into account the circumstances it is found in. This means any knife can be illegal to carry, in certain places. (for example in bars, concerts or (football) stadiums)

Things that -are- legal (considering the circumstances):
- Locking knives
- OHO knives
- any folding knives -under- a total length of 28cm (and with only 1 cutting edge per blade)
- any fixed blades with only 1 cutting edge
- assisted opening knives

(disclaimer: I'm in no ways a lawyer, I just found this on the internet, and even though I think it's a reliable source, I reject any responsibility if I'm wrong ;)  )
« Last Edit: September 30, 2013, 05:38:29 PM by bmot »

A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller. : http://forum.multitool.or...ex.php/topic,47532.0.html

I feel more awesome than an awesome possum 8)
Full Member Posts: 123
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2013, 05:27:29 PM »
UK

Nothing.

The Leatherman crunch.  One of God's own prototypes. A high-powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass consumption. Too weird to live, and too rare to die.
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 13,375 I'm not a pessimist, I'm an experienced optimist!
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2013, 05:54:25 PM »
UK

Nothing.

Not very helpful .....  ::)


Essentially all switchblades, flick knives and balisongs etc are banned outright

Generally carry of a non-locking blade under 3" is permissible.
Larger blades, locking blades and fixed blades can be carried with good reason (not lame excuse to just try and get away with it). For the purposes of this thread stick to sub 3" non locking blades, unless you know that your needs warrant something else in the eyes of the law.


NOTE: Any blade and indeed any item carried (or deemed to be carried) for the purposes of use as a weapon is prohibited. Threaten someone with a Spyderco Bug, 58mm Classic, or even a pencil, and it will be deemed an offensive weapon. Some places may have blades prohibited outright such as schools and other public buildings

Most Used Victorinox: - Climber Small, Alox Rambler, 70s Outdoorsman, CT41, Spirit X, + mods
Most Used Wenger: - Various Travellers, Pocket Tool Chest, + mods
Most Used Gerber: - Balance, Dime, + mods
Most Used Leatherman: Sideclip, Anniversary Wave, + mods
Current Mods (in use): MP426, Fuse-ilier, DEsTroyer, The PUG, Mega84, The Sheepsfoot Duke, TurboDiesel, Neutered Octane, Brian

***NEW "FOR SALE" THREAD COMING SOON***
No Life Club Posts: 2,768
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2013, 07:00:25 PM »
Norway:

The actual law on carrying knives in public, in Norwegian: http://www.lovdata.no/all...9020522-010-040.html#352a

Illegal knife types, again, the actual law in Norwegian: http://www.lovdata.no/cgi...html&emne=batangakniv*&#map001

Short version, all knives need justification for carrying in public places. If you're going hiking, it's OK carrying a fixed blade, if you're wearing a traditional costume, it's OK wearing a traditional knife and so and so forth.

Stillettoes, balisongs and automatic knives are illegal to possess. Assisted openers are legal, but mainly because the lawmakers haven't discovered them, so don't wave one around in front of an LEO.

There is nothing special legally about locking blades, OHO, etc.

Personal impression from a native knife carrier: SAKs and multitools are generally ignored. Most people are reasonably enough to realize it's nice having a knife for your lunch apple. (There is also legal precedence for this from at least on court case.)
Full Member Posts: 228 I shot the sherrif...
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2013, 08:00:59 PM »
In Spain it is also quite restrictive. There is also a "joker card" of sorts that allows the police to use his/her judgment about it as well.

so forbidden weapons:

-daggers
-sword canes
-swith blades

a dagger is considered any bladed weapon that has double edges, sharp point and less that 11cm blade lenght.

onwer ship: Prohibited unless at home for colection/display

use: prohibited use on any device that is considered a weapon (machete, knives and other bladed weapons). Also prohibited use of non automatic knives with blade lenght exceeding 11cm. These prohibitions exclude at home collection/display of bladed weapons over 11cm

carry, display, use:totally prohibited public carry/display of anyhting considered a weapon (fire arms and bladed weapons) this also include dartguns. It will also be considered illegal carry/use of weapons in public establishments as well other places for reunions, sports.

there is however a certain "leeway" as a cop can decide if you are carrying a weapon. Depends on his mood that day, but as per the law it can be impounded. Furthermore, if you are caught carrying anything considered a weapon, if you need it for anything considered legal (carrying a gun to the range, your knife set to the restaurent kicthen) then it is within the scope of your work. As long as you do not have inmediate access to it, then you can carry it as well. Same goes for survival knives at a hunting range or a clearing machete for farm work.

one handed knives are not particulary prohibited. as are locking knives.

as stated b4, this is pure google.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2013, 08:03:06 PM by El Rago »
No Life Club Posts: 4,749
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2013, 08:25:07 PM »
USA

(feel free to edit)

Big northern cities...best not carry anything other than a SAK

South is a free fer all usually at the sheriff's, troopers, local police discretion. Never conceal a big sheath knife. Just carry it wide open on the belt  and usually no trouble.

The USA is a big place so best check into local laws to be safe. I'm from the south ( Texas ) so we are pretty knife happy down here.   

:like:
Jr. Member Posts: 93
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2013, 10:42:06 PM »
(Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, this post is not legal advice and should be considered for entertainment purposes only)

For Chicago:

I live in Chicago, but I have never checked the local laws. Inspired by this thread, I looked up the section on "Deadly Weapons" in the municipal code. The code bans switchblades, stilettos, daggers, dirks, bowie knives "commando knives" and spring loaded knives.

Individuals under age 18 are prohibited from carrying any kind of knife with a blade 2 inches or longer. "Utility knives" are also specifically banned for individuals under 18.

Individuals over the age of 18 are prohibited from carrying any kind of knife with a blade 2.5 inches or longer.
No Life Club Posts: 2,771
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #8 on: October 01, 2013, 03:31:43 AM »
I'm lucky I live in upstate NY, there really are no knife restrictions here :think:
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,685 Stranger in a Strange Land
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2013, 03:58:16 AM »
Not that I ever travel but I think I'd leave my knife in the car before I got on any plane and I'd buy a new knife when I got where I was going.

its a excuse to buy a new knife.

it can be traditional to the country your visiting you can keep as a reminder of the journey.

just don't forget to mail it to yourself before getting on a plane again :)                                         

Defend the Hive!!!
No Life Club Posts: 4,525 Don't judge a tool by it's brand
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #10 on: October 01, 2013, 04:39:24 AM »
Not that I ever travel but I think I'd leave my knife in the car before I got on any plane and I'd buy a new knife when I got where I was going.

its a excuse to buy a new knife.

it can be traditional to the country your visiting you can keep as a reminder of the journey.

just don't forget to mail it to yourself before getting on a plane again :)                                       


Good point :)


Though I don't really like travelling by plane, and, within Europe, that's quite possible, lots of trains, and car-distances aren't too far, too... (Certainly from my tiny little home country  :whistle: ).


Not travelling by plane, of course, means less trouble with planes :D, and means that I'd take a multitool (or just a knife) which could very well be locking and/or OHO, which means I would want to know if that's illegal in the country I'd travel to.


I suppose this could be less of an issue in the USA, where more traffic is done by flight.

A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller. : http://forum.multitool.or...ex.php/topic,47532.0.html

I feel more awesome than an awesome possum 8)
Full Member Posts: 248
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #11 on: October 01, 2013, 05:08:48 AM »
I'm in Arizona, if you show up here without a knife and a pistol we have loaners, all we ask is that you help us guard the border and prevent illegal entry.

Oh, that's the border with California, not Mexico!  >:D
Full Member Posts: 123
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #12 on: October 01, 2013, 09:44:37 AM »
My point being there is NOTHING you can carry with impunity.  It all comes down to the officers discretion.

You knife may only be a non-locking, 1" long letter opener but the fact is if an officer is having a bad day and has you on a 27B/6 section 2 of the 'I don't like the look of your face son' act then he can confiscate anything remotely pointy and charge you with carrying an offensive weapon.

The Leatherman crunch.  One of God's own prototypes. A high-powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass consumption. Too weird to live, and too rare to die.
Sr. Member Posts: 380
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #13 on: October 01, 2013, 12:53:54 PM »
Germany

1.) Pocket knives which can be openend with one hand AND have a locking mechanism are "problematic" except
a) you have a "legal reason" to carry them,
b) they are transported in a locked case.

2.) Pocket knives which can be opened with one hand but don´t have a locking mechanism or knives which can´t be opened with one hand but do have a locking mechanism can be carried without restrictions.

3.) Multitools with one-hand-opening/assisted blades seem to fall under 1.) above. All other can be carried without any restriction.

4.) OTF´s, Balisongs, pushdagger etc. are considered as weapons and are not legal.

5.) Side opening automatic knives with a blade not longer than 8,5 cm are legal if
a) you have a "legal reason" to carry them,
b) b) they are transported in a locked case.

6.) Fixed blades are legal if the blade is not longer than 12 cm. You need a "legal reason" or carry them in a locked box if they are longer than 12 cm. Daggers (or any knives with two sharp edges), swords etc. are considered as weapons and are not legal.
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 13,375 I'm not a pessimist, I'm an experienced optimist!
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #14 on: October 01, 2013, 01:12:22 PM »
My point being there is NOTHING you can carry with impunity.  It all comes down to the officers discretion.

You knife may only be a non-locking, 1" long letter opener but the fact is if an officer is having a bad day and has you on a 27B/6 section 2 of the 'I don't like the look of your face son' act then he can confiscate anything remotely pointy and charge you with carrying an offensive weapon.

Whilst I cannot comment on your locality, I can say I have never had a problem. I have used SAKs in a city hospital (eating an apple), and openly worn a 4" sheath knife whilst boating through several towns (including operating a lock directly outside a courthouse), plus fixed spectacles in pubs and so on and so on. I would say advice for travellers would be carry no more than a 91mm SAK or MT equivalent, and use discretion and common sense in use (don't go waving it about unnecessarily)

Most Used Victorinox: - Climber Small, Alox Rambler, 70s Outdoorsman, CT41, Spirit X, + mods
Most Used Wenger: - Various Travellers, Pocket Tool Chest, + mods
Most Used Gerber: - Balance, Dime, + mods
Most Used Leatherman: Sideclip, Anniversary Wave, + mods
Current Mods (in use): MP426, Fuse-ilier, DEsTroyer, The PUG, Mega84, The Sheepsfoot Duke, TurboDiesel, Neutered Octane, Brian

***NEW "FOR SALE" THREAD COMING SOON***
No Life Club Posts: 1,102
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #15 on: October 01, 2013, 02:11:03 PM »
My point being there is NOTHING you can carry with impunity.  It all comes down to the officers discretion.

You knife may only be a non-locking, 1" long letter opener but the fact is if an officer is having a bad day and has you on a 27B/6 section 2 of the 'I don't like the look of your face son' act then he can confiscate anything remotely pointy and charge you with carrying an offensive weapon.

It's posts like this that gives the UK a bad name on the internet.

You know full well that even if the officer did as you have said above it would go no further as the CPS would throw it out before getting to court.

Please stick to facts and qoute law, not Daily Mail articles and "my mate down the pub told me...".
Full Member Posts: 123
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #16 on: October 01, 2013, 03:29:13 PM »
1. Nobody said anything about pubs or mates.
2. That is the law.
3. Nobody reads the daily fail.
4. No need to be so acerbic.

« Last Edit: October 01, 2013, 03:39:31 PM by xt60043f »

The Leatherman crunch.  One of God's own prototypes. A high-powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass consumption. Too weird to live, and too rare to die.
Global Moderator Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 19,999 I may get older but I refuse to grow up.
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #17 on: October 01, 2013, 03:44:42 PM »
Thanks for your input. We now have the regulations for the UK. The OP said no discussions or law bashing so please if you wish to continue, take it to PM.

:salute:
No Life Club Posts: 3,081 You don't want to see me SMURF!
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #18 on: October 01, 2013, 07:50:58 PM »
I'll gather some info about finnish law, and post the info here later :)

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools."
- Douglas Adams

Completely Random Smurf with Aleph
Slingshot Channel
Colin Furze Thread
No Life Club Posts: 4,525 Don't judge a tool by it's brand
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #19 on: October 01, 2013, 08:01:06 PM »
I'll gather some info about finnish law, and post the info here later :)
:salute:




All thanks for your useful additions :salute:

A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller. : http://forum.multitool.or...ex.php/topic,47532.0.html

I feel more awesome than an awesome possum 8)
Global Moderator Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 19,999 I may get older but I refuse to grow up.
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #20 on: October 01, 2013, 08:17:19 PM »
I think it would be best if we added links to the laws we're describing. For instance I'll add the one for Germany cause I have it bookmarked for some reason. ;)

 I'll add the Croatian law land it's link later on when I've had a chance to verify some things. :salute:

Germany

1.) Pocket knives which can be openend with one hand AND have a locking mechanism are "problematic" except
a) you have a "legal reason" to carry them,
b) they are transported in a locked case.

2.) Pocket knives which can be opened with one hand but don´t have a locking mechanism or knives which can´t be opened with one hand but do have a locking mechanism can be carried without restrictions.

3.) Multitools with one-hand-opening/assisted blades seem to fall under 1.) above. All other can be carried without any restriction.

4.) OTF´s, Balisongs, pushdagger etc. are considered as weapons and are not legal.

5.) Side opening automatic knives with a blade not longer than 8,5 cm are legal if
a) you have a "legal reason" to carry them,
b) b) they are transported in a locked case.

6.) Fixed blades are legal if the blade is not longer than 12 cm. You need a "legal reason" or carry them in a locked box if they are longer than 12 cm. Daggers (or any knives with two sharp edges), swords etc. are considered as weapons and are not legal.

http://www.gesetze-im-int....de/waffg_2002/__42a.html
Hero Member Posts: 923
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #21 on: October 02, 2013, 05:07:56 AM »
USA

(feel free to edit)

Big northern cities...best not carry anything other than a SAK

South is a free fer all usually at the sheriff's, troopers, local police discretion. Never conceal a big sheath knife. Just carry it wide open on the belt  and usually no trouble.

The USA is a big place so best check into local laws to be safe. I'm from the south ( Texas ) so we are pretty knife happy down here.   

Agree the US is really tough because of the patchwork of state laws.  Further, in any state which in which the state legislature has not enacted knife law preemption, counties, cities, and other localities are free to pass laws that are even more restrictive.  Best to try to check specific locations where you will be traveling if possible.  In much of the country, there are few if any restrictions, while some cities, such as New York, Boston, Chicago, and Philadelphia, have such strict laws that even the aforementioned SAK may not technically be legal.

Here are a couple of decent resources:

http://www.akti.org/resources

http://www.kniferights.or...ew&id=67&Itemid=1

http://pweb.netcom.com/~brlevine/sta-law.htm - This used to be pretty good, but seems not to have been updated in a few years.
No Life Club Posts: 4,525 Don't judge a tool by it's brand
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #22 on: October 02, 2013, 11:05:15 AM »
USA

(feel free to edit)

Big northern cities...best not carry anything other than a SAK

South is a free fer all usually at the sheriff's, troopers, local police discretion. Never conceal a big sheath knife. Just carry it wide open on the belt  and usually no trouble.

The USA is a big place so best check into local laws to be safe. I'm from the south ( Texas ) so we are pretty knife happy down here.   

Agree the US is really tough because of the patchwork of state laws.  Further, in any state which in which the state legislature has not enacted knife law preemption, counties, cities, and other localities are free to pass laws that are even more restrictive.  Best to try to check specific locations where you will be traveling if possible.  In much of the country, there are few if any restrictions, while some cities, such as New York, Boston, Chicago, and Philadelphia, have such strict laws that even the aforementioned SAK may not technically be legal.

Here are a couple of decent resources:

http://www.akti.org/resources

http://www.kniferights.or...ew&id=67&Itemid=1

http://pweb.netcom.com/~brlevine/sta-law.htm - This used to be pretty good, but seems not to have been updated in a few years.


I quite understand it might be a hard question for the USA, indeed... But maybe you can write down what laws -you- have, locally? If we collect all the small pieces, we'll have the most part covered, eventually ;)

A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller. : http://forum.multitool.or...ex.php/topic,47532.0.html

I feel more awesome than an awesome possum 8)
Hero Member Posts: 718
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #23 on: October 03, 2013, 02:35:56 PM »
Off the top of my head, California has no length limit. Folders must be concealed, fixed blades must be open. Bali's and switchblades are legal to carry if blade is under two inches. Concealed blades, such as a sword cane or hairbrush knife, saps, daggers, batons, knuckles, belt buckle knives, and several other things are out and out illegal to carry. I will have to track down the law to link to. There is no state level preemption, so local laws may be more restrictive than state laws. I am not a lawyer, and anything I post should not be considered legal advise; I'm just a guy on the Internet.
No Life Club Posts: 3,081 You don't want to see me SMURF!
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #24 on: October 03, 2013, 08:19:25 PM »
As promised, here's what I got for finnish law...

Stilettos are outright illegal, as are disguised blades and shurikens

Blades as themselves are allowed to be carried on person if needed for work related reasons

What this means? Say, if you work on a construction site, you're allowed to carry a puukko (or other knife) unconcealed.

If you carry a SAK, a folder or any other blade, without any work related reason, it can be possibly confiscated IF you are searched.. I doubt this would happen with SAKs, but folders are probably fair game and fixed blades definitely

http://www.finlex.fi/fi/l...tasa/2003/20030612?search[type]=pika&search[pika]=j%C3%A4rjestyslaki
« Last Edit: October 03, 2013, 08:21:48 PM by Aleph78 »

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools."
- Douglas Adams

Completely Random Smurf with Aleph
Slingshot Channel
Colin Furze Thread
Global Moderator Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 19,999 I may get older but I refuse to grow up.
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #25 on: October 03, 2013, 11:58:35 PM »
CROATIA:


Article 5, paragraph 5 of the Weapons law.

http://narodne-novine.nn....beni/2007_06_63_1959.html

Quote
5)

Hladno oružje] su bodeži, kame, mačevi, sablje, bajunete i skakavci čije se sječivo nalazi pod pritiskom sabijene opruge, a iz drške iskaču pritiskom na puce ili polugu boksera i metalnih zvjezdica za bacanje, bez obzira na dužinu oštrice ili skrivene oštrice, bokseri te druga potajna oružja sa skrivenim oštricama (oružni štapovi, oružni kišobrani i sl.). Hladnim oružjem smatraju se i predmeti pogodni za nanošenje ozljeda kada se nose na javnim mjestima.

Or translated :D

5)
Cold weapons are daggers, kamas, swords, bayonets and spring assisted knives whose blade is under tension by a loaded spring and jump out the handle by pressing a button, brass knuckles and throwing stars, no matter the length of the blade or if the blade is hidden and other hidden weapons with hidden blades (walking sticks, umbrellas and similar with hidden weapons). Also considered cold weapons are objects suitable to infect injuries when carried in public places.

And no, it's not me translating it badly, it really is written that way. ::)

If it doesn't fall under that category of knives described above, you can carry it. Multitools and SAKs are mostly ok. I'm not completely sure about assisted opening knives or knives with a false back edge like the Spydie Native, CRKT M16 or the similar.

And hope the police officer who stops you knows the law too. ;) They mostly do though as I nicely tested it out for you. ;) I got searched this winter from head to toe during a what looked like a drug raid. I was at a local cafe/bar with about 8 friends for drinks and a chat, we were the only guests except for a couple in a booth. :D One of my friends asked me to bring some of my multitools as he was interested in getting one. And then comes the police. I had on me: Skeletool, Wave, Spirit X, ST300 and a Rambler on my keys. :ahhh Maybe more. >:D The cop searching me asked at one point "Is that all?" and I replied "Not yet" :D I was just waiting for the rest of the guys to start laughing. Not a single question was raised about the legality of any of them by any of the 20 police officers there. They did search my socks though. :doh:

That doesn't mean you can walk around town with your fixed blade strapped to your belt though. That would most surely get you arrested.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2013, 12:00:26 AM by enki_ck »

No Life Club Posts: 4,525 Don't judge a tool by it's brand
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #26 on: October 04, 2013, 12:08:14 AM »
CROATIA:


Article 5, paragraph 5 of the Weapons law.

http://narodne-novine.nn....beni/2007_06_63_1959.html

Quote
5)

Hladno oružje] su bodeži, kame, mačevi, sablje, bajunete i skakavci čije se sječivo nalazi pod pritiskom sabijene opruge, a iz drške iskaču pritiskom na puce ili polugu boksera i metalnih zvjezdica za bacanje, bez obzira na dužinu oštrice ili skrivene oštrice, bokseri te druga potajna oružja sa skrivenim oštricama (oružni štapovi, oružni kišobrani i sl.). Hladnim oružjem smatraju se i predmeti pogodni za nanošenje ozljeda kada se nose na javnim mjestima.

Or translated :D

5)
Cold weapons are daggers, kamas, swords, bayonets and spring assisted knives whose blade is under tension by a loaded spring and jump out the handle by pressing a button, brass knuckles and throwing stars, no matter the length of the blade or if the blade is hidden and other hidden weapons with hidden blades (walking sticks, umbrellas and similar with hidden weapons). Also considered cold weapons are objects suitable to infect injuries when carried in public places.

And no, it's not me translating it badly, it really is written that way. ::)

If it doesn't fall under that category of knives described above, you can carry it. Multitools and SAKs are mostly ok. I'm not completely sure about assisted opening knives or knives with a false back edge like the Spydie Native, CRKT M16 or the similar.

And hope the police officer who stops you knows the law too. ;) They mostly do though as I nicely tested it out for you. ;) I got searched this winter from head to toe during a what looked like a drug raid. I was at a local cafe/bar with about 8 friends for drinks and a chat, we were the only guests except for a couple in a booth. :D One of my friends asked me to bring some of my multitools as he was interested in getting one. And then comes the police. I had on me: Skeletool, Wave, Spirit X, ST300 and a Rambler on my keys. :ahhh Maybe more. >:D The cop searching me asked at one point "Is that all?" and I replied "Not yet" :D I was just waiting for the rest of the guys to start laughing. Not a single question was raised about the legality of any of them by any of the 20 police officers there. They did search my socks though. :doh:

That doesn't mean you can walk around town with your fixed blade strapped to your belt though. That would most surely get you arrested.


Thanks for this, and, the story attached :D  :salute:




I'd like to point out that so far, pretty much every law I've read here has a sentence/part like this:


Also considered cold weapons are objects suitable to infect injuries when carried in public places.

Good thing to keep in mind when visiting a bar or any other public place ;)

A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller. : http://forum.multitool.or...ex.php/topic,47532.0.html

I feel more awesome than an awesome possum 8)
No Life Club Posts: 2,239 American Custom Materials Executive (ACME)
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #27 on: October 06, 2013, 04:30:17 AM »
USA, Vermont:

Auto openners are iffy except for fire, rescue, EMS, military personnel (active or Guard/Reserve), and those with a disability. There is a question for clarification of the law which may modify this.

Nothing at all in courthouses, mental institutions, corrections centers or the work camp, for what should be fairly obvious reasons; ditto schools (25 years ago, pretty much every guy had a knife in high school) except for certain trade and outdoors programs. Technically carrying a knife into a state or local office building,  or hospital is a violation of the same law, but so long as you aren't being a smurfhead about it, no one says anything about a folder or multi for the most part. I know they've stepped up security at the statehouse in the past few years, but I had my SAK, LM and folder on me last spring when I was last there, but they did ask my roommate to leave his neck knife out in the truck but let him in with his folder and SAK.

You have to be IIRC 14 to buy knives. (Store policy may say 16 or even 18!)

And you can't carry a weapon over six feet in length concealed; local municipalities may have open carry regs.  :rant:

On a slight side note, my dad doesn't carry a knife, but he knows my brother and I do. I remember the time asked for a knife and my little brother handed him a boot knife; when asked why it was in his boot, he said because it was a boot knife. My brother was 13 at the time, and this was quite legal so sayeth the judge (and scout master) in the room at the time.

There is man the tool maker, man the tool user, and man the tool- choose your path wisely.

"So I left the realm of man and beast to become a god, and leave my fingerprints upon the sky."

"Even if it is only the handful of people I meet on the street, or in my home, I can still protect them with this one sword."
Hero Member Posts: 923
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #28 on: October 06, 2013, 08:21:44 AM »
...you can't carry a weapon over six feet in length concealed...

Seems like that would be tough to pull off, law or no law.
Ambidangerous Mistress of Mod Admin Team Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 15,073 I'm not all bad, I'm just drawn that way.
Re: A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller.
« Reply #29 on: October 06, 2013, 11:28:44 AM »
It's interesting how much the law differs so much, even with Europe... good info guys, thank you :tu:

A dyslexic man walks in to a bra...

All my music for free: http://soundcloud.com/chrissyvandyke

 

Operational Funds

Keep the Unworkable working! Donate with PayPal!
March Goal: $275.00
Due Date: Mar 31
Total Receipts: $75.00
PayPal Fees: $4.34
Net Balance: $70.66
Below Goal: $204.34
Site Currency: USD
26% 
March Donations

Community Links

Powered by EzPortal
© 2016 Defender Web & Tool