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The Little SAKs 4763

Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 37,042
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #30 on: September 14, 2016, 04:48:52 AM »
I have a dream.

That one day I have aquired the skill and mental fortitude to assemble a set of modified little SAKs that as a collection will give me access to all topside tools that victorinox offers with a bare minimum of tool redundancy. :drool:

It might look something like this: (red scales throughout)
- 111m Swiss cheese knife - food prep blades and corkscrew (2 toothpicks, because cheese)
- 84 Alox Bantam - everpresent pocket buddy
- 74mm scissors and nail file in an alox money clip - grooming kit
- 91mm 2 layer tool with cybertool bit layer, mag-glas/led layer and bottom phillips and plus scales - office tinkering I
- 93mm 2 layer tool with pliers and metal saw -  office tinkering II
- 93mm 2 layer tool with wood saw, pruner blade and awl - minimalist woods kit

:dd:

+1 :like:

:dd:

Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 37,042
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #31 on: September 14, 2016, 04:49:24 AM »
New page banana man dance

:nanadance:       :nanadance:

Sr. Member Posts: 499 Need more SAKs !
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #32 on: September 17, 2016, 04:49:26 PM »
New page banana man dance

:nanadance:       :nanadance:

+1!

New & Old always a SAK collector
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Sr. Member Posts: 499 Need more SAKs !
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #33 on: October 15, 2016, 02:01:28 AM »
New page banana man dance

:nanadance:       :nanadance:

+1!

Thanks for the BM dance!
Waiter Weekend-- sorry Spartan Saturday...

New & Old always a SAK collector
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Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #34 on: October 15, 2016, 06:59:55 PM »
Normally carry my custom Yeoman... But when pocket space is a premium or just in the mood for a 2 layer, my custom 91mm Golfer will take its place.



Am currently waiting on a pair of custom scales and liners to complete my 84mm Golfer mod...






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Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 15,074 I'm not a pessimist, I'm an experienced optimist!
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #35 on: October 15, 2016, 08:10:05 PM »
 :like: :like: :like:


My current users:
Victorinox: - Spirit X, Climber Small, Alox Rambler, Orig. Outdoorsman, Voyager Lite, CT34 & 41, Compact, Manager, Salesman, + mods (Sheepsfoot Duke & Mega84)
Wenger: - Traveler, PTC + mods (Brian)
Gerber: - Balance, Dime + mods (MP426**, DEsTroyer, MP6000**, TurboDiesel**, Neutered Octane**)
Leatherman: - Sideclip, KF4, + mods (Fuse-ilier**, Knifeless Wave**)
Others: - Vise Grips LC6
** = knifeless
Hero Member Posts: 509 Embrace the SAK

T14 dk

***** *
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #36 on: October 15, 2016, 08:51:19 PM »
Mockup.

I have yet to try peening, so this thing will have to wait until after a couple of practice runs next weekend  :ahhh

All I know is that I don't know anything - but I can't prove it!
Hero Member Posts: 984
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #37 on: October 16, 2016, 02:58:25 AM »
Mockup.

I have yet to try peening, so this thing will have to wait until after a couple of practice runs next weekend  :ahhh

Look for some videos on YouTube - they helped me immensely. Thousands of little taps do it; patience is paramount. Heavy blows with the hammer don't work (and can rack the liners). The first time you'll wonder if you'll ever get done, but it eventually does. Keep the other side of the rivet solidly on the anvil. I alternated between the two sides, keeping the mushrooming about even throughout. After you do it a couple times you'll know how it progresses and will have a feel for how often to switch sides. Doing a couple practice runs is a good idea. Good luck with the work!

John

John
Hero Member Posts: 509 Embrace the SAK

T14 dk

***** *
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #38 on: October 16, 2016, 09:16:31 AM »
Cheers John. All input is greatly appreciated. :cheers:

I think I'll start learning by putting together a couple of 1 or 2 layer test knives using just blades, fish-scaler and corkscrews. No bushings (My disassembly loss rate is 50%  :facepalm:), so they will get diy wood scales eventually.
Afterwards I'll hopefully be ready to tackle a bushing peen job by reusing the swisschamp pins cut to length for the cybertraveller.

-Tom


All I know is that I don't know anything - but I can't prove it!
Hero Member Posts: 984
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #39 on: October 16, 2016, 11:06:26 AM »
So it be the wee ones you want to see!

I've annotated which of the Victorinox have been discontinued. Goes without saying all of the Wenger have been since 2013 if not longer.

74mm Victorinox Ambassador and Executive:
Currently don't carry either carry either and don't use them that often unless they're nearby and convenient for a quick, small task needing one of the tools. I generally use a Rambler or MiniChamp for peeling oranges, but have used the Executive's "scraper" and it works quite well. Should start carrying these as I do like their physical size.



84mm Victorinox Cadet and Bantam:
Two recent acquisitions, these are very thin, especially the Bantam. Both are minimalist, in tools, thickness and weight, especially the Bantam. Scales are thinner than the 93mm Pioneer and its derivative, but they're still quite rigid and strong. Haven't carried these much yet but anticipate I will when I want a thin, minimalist "gentleman's" pocket carry in semi-formal (suit and tie) or formal wear. The Cadet is like an Alox Sportsman, without the awl and corkscrew. I also characterize it as a gentleman's knife with a nice tool set. I know some think the file and nail cleaner are useless baggage, but I regularly use a small file and the pointed tip also works very nicely as a low torque Phillips.



84mm Victorinox Apprentice (discontinued) and Waiter:
I have two of each. Fabricated four Apprentices from nearly new Waiters by transplanting the back layer Phillips from thrashed Tinker organ donors. I've given two to good friends, use one, and keep the fourth one stashed away. Almost as bare bones minimalist as the Bantam, I use the Apprentice and the Waiter with regularity. The Waiter is used mostly at home but will carry it in a wine cooler with bottles of wine to friends' homes where they invariably cannot find a corkscrew very quickly. The Apprentice is another occasional pocket carry when I want a thin Gentleman's size knife. It's a minimalist Skinny Tinker. I'll grab it for simple quick tasks at home that need only a Phillips or flat-tip instead of going to the utility room toolbox or the garage workbench. It's surprising how much can be done with so little, which also applies to the Bantam.



84mm Victorinox Watch Opener:
Anyone who replaces the batteries in their own watch should have one of these. While notched screw down backs have become more popular since the 1960's for their water resistance, many still use a snap on back, and a good "Watch Knife" can get a snap down back off in just a couple seconds. No more ruining jeweler's drivers or gouging and scratching a watch back by prying with with a driver, and it's much easier. It's also an excellent tool for removing Victorinox Cellidor scales!



84mm Victorinox Small Tinker and Sportsman:
Like the Cadet and Bantam, these offer up less obtrusive, smaller pocket carry than the larger Tinker and Spartan. They're for those occasions when I'm dressed informal or casual and having an awl and Phillips or corkscrew might come in handy instead of the Cadet or Bantam. I've got a second Small Tinker stashed away that I acquired when rounding up organ donors for the Apprentice fabrication. The Sportsman has a pointed tip file, which I like, just as I do on the Cadet. It can also be used to drive lower torque Phillips screws. Higher torque needs the 3-D Phillips on the back layer of the Small Tinker.



85mm Wenger Commander and Highlander:
They're Wenger equivalents of the Small Tinker and Sportsman, and serve the same function, although they're just a tad bigger in each dimension. Like many, I don't consider the can opener or awl quite as good as Victorinox's. The awl does work, but not nearly as easily. The can opener is quite good, as a can opener. I've always wished it had the smaller flat-tip found on the Victorinox. Mitigating that is the pointed tip on the file which, like the sportsman, can be readily used on low torque Phillips screws, while the 3-D Phillips on the Highlander can handle higher torque. As with the Cadet and Sportsman, having a file in place of the small pen blade is just fine with me in the 84mm and 85mm smaller size knives.



85mm Wenger Evolution 63 and EvoGrip 64:
These are Wenger's Evolution equivalents to Victorinox's Waiter and Apprentice. Grabbed two of the Evo 63's and stashed one away. Did the same with the EvoGrip 64's but gave one to the same close friend I gave the Apprentice to. He is enamored with Vic Tinker. When he told me the Small Tinker was the smallest SAK with both Phillips and flat-tip (other than the 58mm Rally) I set about showing him it wasn't. Everything said about them applies here. I'll sometimes use these in lieu of the Waiter or Apprentice. The Evo scales are a little fatter and thicker than the Vic and I like how their sculpting fits well in my hand. Combo tool works fine on lower torque flat-tip and on Phillips using a corner of the tip. As a cap lifter it does just fine. Finally used one to open a can this week. Works OK although there's a little of a learning curve, and works best when used in the same manner and direction as Wenger's standard eagle beak can opener. Neither of the combo tools, Vic's or Wenger's makes as clean a slice through the can lid as their standard openers, but the result is still quite acceptable.



85mm Wenger EvoGrip 11.x Blackout:
This one is Multitool.org's 7th Anniversary knife. The EvoGrip version of Wenger's Highlander, it has the same tool set with the EvoGrip scales that have rubberized inserts in them. This one is kept stashed away in its presentation box. It's too beautiful to put into the EDC rotation.



85mm Wenger Evolution S101 and Victorinox Delemont Evolution S111:
Side by side, one can see that Victorinox carried the Evolution line across to their product line with little modification. Aside from the logo, Victorinox replaced the awl, can opener, toothpick and tweezers with the Victorinox. It has kept all the other Wenger tools, including the cap lifter that locks when push on (fully open), the scissors and the main blade profile with a more pronounced, deeper belly. The unique aspect of these is the lock back on the main blade. A lever along the side of the liner disengages the spring from the blade tang, and it has a very positive stop at about 40% closed to aid in closing the blade without nicking any fingers. They are the locking blade Evolution line cousins of the Commander and Highlander above, albeit with a small clip blade instead of the pointed file making them the Evo equivlent of Wenger's Adirondack and non-locking Canyon, and Victorinox's non-locking Small Tinker and Tourist.



91mm Victorinox Compact and Scientist (discontinued):
By replacing the opener layer with awl and the small pen blade in the blade layer with a combo tool, these eliminate one layer from the Climber and Passenger (also discontinued) respectively producing minimalist two layer versions of them with Plus scales that have a ballpoint pen. I have two Scientists; the other one has red scales, but is otherwise identical. I carry the older Scientist now when cycling as part of a tool set that includes a Victorinox Bike Tool and a 65mm Vic Executive 81 (Wenger Esquire with Vic T&T). The primary reason is the magnifier, straight pin and tweezers. I don't carry the Compact or Scientist as much as the others, but there are occasions when I want a tool rich two layer in my pocket. These have specific functionalities the traditional two-layer Tinker and Spartan do not have.



These are my "Little SAKs" - the models that don't pack everything, but do pack quite a bit in a small space for those occasions when a three layer or more is too bulky to be carried easily. I don't need a SwissChamp, I only need a slice of one. Which slice depends on where I'm going, what I'll be wearing and what I'll be doing. I've got a number of three, four, five and six layer Vics and take one of those when it's needed, but most of the time, I only need one of these away from home.

John

John
Hero Member Posts: 984
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #40 on: October 16, 2016, 11:18:19 AM »
Cheers John. All input is greatly appreciated. :cheers:

I think I'll start learning by putting together a couple of 1 or 2 layer test knives using just blades, fish-scaler and corkscrews. No bushings (My disassembly loss rate is 50%  :facepalm: ), so they will get diy wood scales eventually.
Afterwards I'll hopefully be ready to tackle a bushing peen job by reusing the swisschamp pins cut to length for the cybertraveller.

-Tom

You can get some 91mm completely thrashed and trashed Vics with broken, bent, and chipped blades, and salvage the bushings from them. Spartans and Tinkers that have seen better days can be frequently found on ePrey. I built a wood fixture to hold a descaled Vic by its bushings with holes for a 91mm on one side and for an 84mm on the other. Had to make a small hole for the back layer rivet head. Helped immensely when drilling out the rivets as it could be held in place much more precisely on the drill press table than by trying to hold it by hand. If I were doing it frequently I'd have made a more durable metal one. Where to drill the holes in the wood fixture? Used a descaled SAK, placed it on the block of Douglas Fir, and whacked the rivet bushings with a plastic mallet. Made sufficient indentations in the block to drill the holes. Even with a radial drill press I still used a center punch as a thin drill bit can still want to wander. Are you drilling them out by hand, or do you have a drill press?

John

John
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 15,074 I'm not a pessimist, I'm an experienced optimist!
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #41 on: October 16, 2016, 11:40:51 AM »
I fell in love with the Compact as soon as I got one. I've never pocket carried it though. After wondering where to fit it in the line-up for a while, I put I in the small FAK that I take hiking or travelling. It never leaves there unless I need it.

Since then, I got the Sheepsfoot Duke - a DofE which I reprofiled. At the moment, it still has the DofE scales, but that might change in time. It's proved itself to be ample for general pocket carry. Initially I had concerns about the durability of the flat driver, but so far it's not been an issue. I tend to carry some form of pliers tool too, so I've something else to fall back on if the task at hand looks too much for it.


My current users:
Victorinox: - Spirit X, Climber Small, Alox Rambler, Orig. Outdoorsman, Voyager Lite, CT34 & 41, Compact, Manager, Salesman, + mods (Sheepsfoot Duke & Mega84)
Wenger: - Traveler, PTC + mods (Brian)
Gerber: - Balance, Dime + mods (MP426**, DEsTroyer, MP6000**, TurboDiesel**, Neutered Octane**)
Leatherman: - Sideclip, KF4, + mods (Fuse-ilier**, Knifeless Wave**)
Others: - Vise Grips LC6
** = knifeless
Sr. Member Posts: 499 Need more SAKs !
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #42 on: October 16, 2016, 01:01:46 PM »
So it be the wee ones you want to see!

I've annotated which of the Victorinox have been discontinued. Goes without saying all of the Wenger have been since 2013 if not longer.

74mm Victorinox Ambassador and Executive:
Currently don't carry either carry either and don't use them that often unless they're nearby and convenient for a quick, small task needing one of the tools. I generally use a Rambler or MiniChamp for peeling oranges, but have used the Executive's "scraper" and it works quite well. Should start carrying these as I do like their physical size.

(Image removed from quote.)

84mm Victorinox Cadet and Bantam:
Two recent acquisitions, these are very thin, especially the Bantam. Both are minimalist, in tools, thickness and weight, especially the Bantam. Scales are thinner than the 93mm Pioneer and its derivative, but they're still quite rigid and strong. Haven't carried these much yet but anticipate I will when I want a thin, minimalist "gentleman's" pocket carry in semi-formal (suit and tie) or formal wear. The Cadet is like an Alox Sportsman, without the awl and corkscrew. I also characterize it as a gentleman's knife with a nice tool set. I know some think the file and nail cleaner are useless baggage, but I regularly use a small file and the pointed tip also works very nicely as a low torque Phillips.

(Image removed from quote.)

84mm Victorinox Apprentice (discontinued) and Waiter:
I have two of each. Fabricated four Apprentices from nearly new Waiters by transplanting the back layer Phillips from thrashed Tinker organ donors. I've given two to good friends, use one, and keep the fourth one stashed away. Almost as bare bones minimalist as the Bantam, I use the Apprentice and the Waiter with regularity. The Waiter is used mostly at home but will carry it in a wine cooler with bottles of wine to friends' homes where they invariably cannot find a corkscrew very quickly. The Apprentice is another occasional pocket carry when I want a thin Gentleman's size knife. It's a minimalist Skinny Tinker. I'll grab it for simple quick tasks at home that need only a Phillips or flat-tip instead of going to the utility room toolbox or the garage workbench. It's surprising how much can be done with so little, which also applies to the Bantam.

(Image removed from quote.)

84mm Victorinox Watch Opener:
Anyone who replaces the batteries in their own watch should have one of these. While notched screw down backs have become more popular since the 1960's for their water resistance, many still use a snap on back, and a good "Watch Knife" can get a snap down back off in just a couple seconds. No more ruining jeweler's drivers or gouging and scratching a watch back by prying with with a driver, and it's much easier. It's also an excellent tool for removing Victorinox Cellidor scales!

(Image removed from quote.)

84mm Victorinox Small Tinker and Sportsman:
Like the Cadet and Bantam, these offer up less obtrusive, smaller pocket carry than the larger Tinker and Spartan. They're for those occasions when I'm dressed informal or casual and having an awl and Phillips or corkscrew might come in handy instead of the Cadet or Bantam. I've got a second Small Tinker stashed away that I acquired when rounding up organ donors for the Apprentice fabrication. The Sportsman has a pointed tip file, which I like, just as I do on the Cadet. It can also be used to drive lower torque Phillips screws. Higher torque needs the 3-D Phillips on the back layer of the Small Tinker.

(Image removed from quote.)

85mm Wenger Commander and Highlander:
They're Wenger equivalents of the Small Tinker and Sportsman, and serve the same function, although they're just a tad bigger in each dimension. Like many, I don't consider the can opener or awl quite as good as Victorinox's. The awl does work, but not nearly as easily. The can opener is quite good, as a can opener. I've always wished it had the smaller flat-tip found on the Victorinox. Mitigating that is the pointed tip on the file which, like the sportsman, can be readily used on low torque Phillips screws, while the 3-D Phillips on the Highlander can handle higher torque. As with the Cadet and Sportsman, having a file in place of the small pen blade is just fine with me in the 84mm and 85mm smaller size knives.

(Image removed from quote.)

85mm Wenger Evolution 63 and EvoGrip 64:
These are Wenger's Evolution equivalents to Victorinox's Waiter and Apprentice. Grabbed two of the Evo 63's and stashed one away. Did the same with the EvoGrip 64's but gave one to the same close friend I gave the Apprentice to. He is enamored with Vic Tinker. When he told me the Small Tinker was the smallest SAK with both Phillips and flat-tip (other than the 58mm Rally) I set about showing him it wasn't. Everything said about them applies here. I'll sometimes use these in lieu of the Waiter or Apprentice. The Evo scales are a little fatter and thicker than the Vic and I like how their sculpting fits well in my hand. Combo tool works fine on lower torque flat-tip and on Phillips using a corner of the tip. As a cap lifter it does just fine. Finally used one to open a can this week. Works OK although there's a little of a learning curve, and works best when used in the same manner and direction as Wenger's standard eagle beak can opener. Neither of the combo tools, Vic's or Wenger's makes as clean a slice through the can lid as their standard openers, but the result is still quite acceptable.

(Image removed from quote.)

85mm Wenger EvoGrip 11.x Blackout:
This one is Multitool.org's 7th Anniversary knife. The EvoGrip version of Wenger's Highlander, it has the same tool set with the EvoGrip scales that have rubberized inserts in them. This one is kept stashed away in its presentation box. It's too beautiful to put into the EDC rotation.

(Image removed from quote.)

85mm Wenger Evolution S101 and Victorinox Delemont Evolution S111:
Side by side, one can see that Victorinox carried the Evolution line across to their product line with little modification. Aside from the logo, Victorinox replaced the awl, can opener, toothpick and tweezers with the Victorinox. It has kept all the other Wenger tools, including the cap lifter that locks when push on (fully open), the scissors and the main blade profile with a more pronounced, deeper belly. The unique aspect of these is the lock back on the main blade. A lever along the side of the liner disengages the spring from the blade tang, and it has a very positive stop at about 40% closed to aid in closing the blade without nicking any fingers. They are the locking blade Evolution line cousins of the Commander and Highlander above, albeit with a small clip blade instead of the pointed file making them the Evo equivlent of Wenger's Adirondack and non-locking Canyon, and Victorinox's non-locking Small Tinker and Tourist.

(Image removed from quote.)

91mm Victorinox Compact and Scientist (discontinued):
By replacing the opener layer with awl and the small pen blade in the blade layer with a combo tool, these eliminate one layer from the Climber and Passenger (also discontinued) respectively producing minimalist two layer versions of them with Plus scales that have a ballpoint pen. I have two Scientists; the other one has red scales, but is otherwise identical. I carry the older Scientist now when cycling as part of a tool set that includes a Victorinox Bike Tool and a 65mm Vic Executive 81 (Wenger Esquire with Vic T&T). The primary reason is the magnifier, straight pin and tweezers. I don't carry the Compact or Scientist as much as the others, but there are occasions when I want a tool rich two layer in my pocket. These have specific functionalities the traditional two-layer Tinker and Spartan do not have.

(Image removed from quote.)

These are my "Little SAKs" - the models that don't pack everything, but do pack quite a bit in a small space for those occasions when a three layer or more is too bulky to be carried easily. I don't need a SwissChamp, I only need a slice of one. Which slice depends on where I'm going, what I'll be wearing and what I'll be doing. I've got a number of three, four, five and six layer Vics and take one of those when it's needed, but most of the time, I only need one of these away from home.

John

Thanks John for the in-depth post!  And I learned a lot!

New & Old always a SAK collector
Join Knife Rights
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Sr. Member Posts: 499 Need more SAKs !
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #43 on: October 16, 2016, 01:04:20 PM »
I fell in love with the Compact as soon as I got one. I've never pocket carried it though. After wondering where to fit it in the line-up for a while, I put I in the small FAK that I take hiking or travelling. It never leaves there unless I need it.

Since then, I got the Sheepsfoot Duke - a DofE which I reprofiled. At the moment, it still has the DofE scales, but that might change in time. It's proved itself to be ample for general pocket carry. Initially I had concerns about the durability of the flat driver, but so far it's not been an issue. I tend to carry some form of pliers tool too, so I've something else to fall back on if the task at hand looks too much for it.
Thanks Trad- I gifted a Compact to my nephew. I'll have to get another.

New & Old always a SAK collector
Join Knife Rights
Join The American Legion
No Life Club Posts: 4,207
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #44 on: October 16, 2016, 01:56:55 PM »
:like: :like: :like:
Thanks 50ft-trad... :cheers:


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
No Life Club Posts: 4,207
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #45 on: October 16, 2016, 01:58:18 PM »
So it be the wee ones you want to see!

I've annotated which of the Victorinox have been discontinued. Goes without saying all of the Wenger have been since 2013 if not longer.

74mm Victorinox Ambassador and Executive:
Currently don't carry either carry either and don't use them that often unless they're nearby and convenient for a quick, small task needing one of the tools. I generally use a Rambler or MiniChamp for peeling oranges, but have used the Executive's "scraper" and it works quite well. Should start carrying these as I do like their physical size.

(Image removed from quote.)

84mm Victorinox Cadet and Bantam:
Two recent acquisitions, these are very thin, especially the Bantam. Both are minimalist, in tools, thickness and weight, especially the Bantam. Scales are thinner than the 93mm Pioneer and its derivative, but they're still quite rigid and strong. Haven't carried these much yet but anticipate I will when I want a thin, minimalist "gentleman's" pocket carry in semi-formal (suit and tie) or formal wear. The Cadet is like an Alox Sportsman, without the awl and corkscrew. I also characterize it as a gentleman's knife with a nice tool set. I know some think the file and nail cleaner are useless baggage, but I regularly use a small file and the pointed tip also works very nicely as a low torque Phillips.

(Image removed from quote.)

84mm Victorinox Apprentice (discontinued) and Waiter:
I have two of each. Fabricated four Apprentices from nearly new Waiters by transplanting the back layer Phillips from thrashed Tinker organ donors. I've given two to good friends, use one, and keep the fourth one stashed away. Almost as bare bones minimalist as the Bantam, I use the Apprentice and the Waiter with regularity. The Waiter is used mostly at home but will carry it in a wine cooler with bottles of wine to friends' homes where they invariably cannot find a corkscrew very quickly. The Apprentice is another occasional pocket carry when I want a thin Gentleman's size knife. It's a minimalist Skinny Tinker. I'll grab it for simple quick tasks at home that need only a Phillips or flat-tip instead of going to the utility room toolbox or the garage workbench. It's surprising how much can be done with so little, which also applies to the Bantam.

(Image removed from quote.)

84mm Victorinox Watch Opener:
Anyone who replaces the batteries in their own watch should have one of these. While notched screw down backs have become more popular since the 1960's for their water resistance, many still use a snap on back, and a good "Watch Knife" can get a snap down back off in just a couple seconds. No more ruining jeweler's drivers or gouging and scratching a watch back by prying with with a driver, and it's much easier. It's also an excellent tool for removing Victorinox Cellidor scales!

(Image removed from quote.)

84mm Victorinox Small Tinker and Sportsman:
Like the Cadet and Bantam, these offer up less obtrusive, smaller pocket carry than the larger Tinker and Spartan. They're for those occasions when I'm dressed informal or casual and having an awl and Phillips or corkscrew might come in handy instead of the Cadet or Bantam. I've got a second Small Tinker stashed away that I acquired when rounding up organ donors for the Apprentice fabrication. The Sportsman has a pointed tip file, which I like, just as I do on the Cadet. It can also be used to drive lower torque Phillips screws. Higher torque needs the 3-D Phillips on the back layer of the Small Tinker.

(Image removed from quote.)

85mm Wenger Commander and Highlander:
They're Wenger equivalents of the Small Tinker and Sportsman, and serve the same function, although they're just a tad bigger in each dimension. Like many, I don't consider the can opener or awl quite as good as Victorinox's. The awl does work, but not nearly as easily. The can opener is quite good, as a can opener. I've always wished it had the smaller flat-tip found on the Victorinox. Mitigating that is the pointed tip on the file which, like the sportsman, can be readily used on low torque Phillips screws, while the 3-D Phillips on the Highlander can handle higher torque. As with the Cadet and Sportsman, having a file in place of the small pen blade is just fine with me in the 84mm and 85mm smaller size knives.

(Image removed from quote.)

85mm Wenger Evolution 63 and EvoGrip 64:
These are Wenger's Evolution equivalents to Victorinox's Waiter and Apprentice. Grabbed two of the Evo 63's and stashed one away. Did the same with the EvoGrip 64's but gave one to the same close friend I gave the Apprentice to. He is enamored with Vic Tinker. When he told me the Small Tinker was the smallest SAK with both Phillips and flat-tip (other than the 58mm Rally) I set about showing him it wasn't. Everything said about them applies here. I'll sometimes use these in lieu of the Waiter or Apprentice. The Evo scales are a little fatter and thicker than the Vic and I like how their sculpting fits well in my hand. Combo tool works fine on lower torque flat-tip and on Phillips using a corner of the tip. As a cap lifter it does just fine. Finally used one to open a can this week. Works OK although there's a little of a learning curve, and works best when used in the same manner and direction as Wenger's standard eagle beak can opener. Neither of the combo tools, Vic's or Wenger's makes as clean a slice through the can lid as their standard openers, but the result is still quite acceptable.

(Image removed from quote.)

85mm Wenger EvoGrip 11.x Blackout:
This one is Multitool.org's 7th Anniversary knife. The EvoGrip version of Wenger's Highlander, it has the same tool set with the EvoGrip scales that have rubberized inserts in them. This one is kept stashed away in its presentation box. It's too beautiful to put into the EDC rotation.

(Image removed from quote.)

85mm Wenger Evolution S101 and Victorinox Delemont Evolution S111:
Side by side, one can see that Victorinox carried the Evolution line across to their product line with little modification. Aside from the logo, Victorinox replaced the awl, can opener, toothpick and tweezers with the Victorinox. It has kept all the other Wenger tools, including the cap lifter that locks when push on (fully open), the scissors and the main blade profile with a more pronounced, deeper belly. The unique aspect of these is the lock back on the main blade. A lever along the side of the liner disengages the spring from the blade tang, and it has a very positive stop at about 40% closed to aid in closing the blade without nicking any fingers. They are the locking blade Evolution line cousins of the Commander and Highlander above, albeit with a small clip blade instead of the pointed file making them the Evo equivlent of Wenger's Adirondack and non-locking Canyon, and Victorinox's non-locking Small Tinker and Tourist.

(Image removed from quote.)

91mm Victorinox Compact and Scientist (discontinued):
By replacing the opener layer with awl and the small pen blade in the blade layer with a combo tool, these eliminate one layer from the Climber and Passenger (also discontinued) respectively producing minimalist two layer versions of them with Plus scales that have a ballpoint pen. I have two Scientists; the other one has red scales, but is otherwise identical. I carry the older Scientist now when cycling as part of a tool set that includes a Victorinox Bike Tool and a 65mm Vic Executive 81 (Wenger Esquire with Vic T&T). The primary reason is the magnifier, straight pin and tweezers. I don't carry the Compact or Scientist as much as the others, but there are occasions when I want a tool rich two layer in my pocket. These have specific functionalities the traditional two-layer Tinker and Spartan do not have.

(Image removed from quote.)

These are my "Little SAKs" - the models that don't pack everything, but do pack quite a bit in a small space for those occasions when a three layer or more is too bulky to be carried easily. I don't need a SwissChamp, I only need a slice of one. Which slice depends on where I'm going, what I'll be wearing and what I'll be doing. I've got a number of three, four, five and six layer Vics and take one of those when it's needed, but most of the time, I only need one of these away from home.

John
:like: :like: :like:


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Hero Member Posts: 509 Embrace the SAK

T14 dk

***** *
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #46 on: October 16, 2016, 07:11:40 PM »
Are you drilling them out by hand, or do you have a drill press?

John

I have a 12v miniature drill press for fine scale modelling, but it is useless for any "real" work, sadly including drilling out SAK pins  :P
So instead I used my 2-handed power drill. Too unwieldy for precision work. In the end I resorted to using a razor saw. It kills the top bushing but preserves the pin right up to the top of the outer liner. 
I can reuse short pins by omitting the bushings altogether and gluing on homemade scales of horn, wood or other fun materials.

The bushings I do have will get used on priority projects where I want proper sak scales.

It is not ideal, but I will make do :tu:

Cheers
-Tom

All I know is that I don't know anything - but I can't prove it!
Newbie Posts: 38
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #47 on: October 22, 2016, 01:31:11 PM »
0.4802
Hero Member Posts: 984
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #48 on: October 22, 2016, 03:32:32 PM »
0.4802

 :like:

Nice Highlander! I've grown to appreciate these compact Wenger over the past year and unlike some the file is useful for me.

John

John
No Life Club Posts: 4,207
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #49 on: October 22, 2016, 04:35:46 PM »
0.4802
Interesting victorinox... never knew there was a sak with both backside phillips and nail file...


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Hero Member Posts: 984
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #50 on: October 22, 2016, 08:09:43 PM »
0.4802
Interesting victorinox... never knew there was a sak with both backside phillips and nail file...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Same here . . . that's why I thought it was a Wenger Highlander.  :think:
Should have spotted the Vic can opener!  :facepalm:

John
No Life Club Posts: 4,207
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #51 on: October 22, 2016, 08:10:57 PM »
0.4802
Interesting victorinox... never knew there was a sak with both backside phillips and nail file...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Same here . . . that's why I thought it was a Wenger Highlander.  :think:
Couldn't even find it on sakwiki... could it be a special run sportsman?


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Hero Member Posts: 984
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #52 on: October 22, 2016, 08:19:11 PM »
0.4802
Interesting victorinox... never knew there was a sak with both backside phillips and nail file...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Same here . . . that's why I thought it was a Wenger Highlander.  :think:
Couldn't even find it on sakwiki... could it be a special run sportsman?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Could be - has marketing/advertising imprint.

John
Sr. Member Posts: 499 Need more SAKs !
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #53 on: November 04, 2016, 01:08:14 AM »
0.4802
Interesting victorinox... never knew there was a sak with both backside phillips and nail file...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Same here . . . that's why I thought it was a Wenger Highlander.  :think:
Couldn't even find it on sakwiki... could it be a special run sportsman?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Could be - has marketing/advertising imprint.
Still liking the Waiter for general round and about...

New & Old always a SAK collector
Join Knife Rights
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Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,844 Firm believer of Sturgeon's Law
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #54 on: November 05, 2016, 04:43:48 PM »
0.4802
Interesting victorinox... never knew there was a sak with both backside phillips and nail file...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Same here . . . that's why I thought it was a Wenger Highlander.  :think:
Couldn't even find it on sakwiki... could it be a special run sportsman?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Could be - has marketing/advertising imprint.
Still liking the Waiter for general round and about...

Really big and complex MT



Really smaLl and simple SAK

My toys:

MTs: Surge (2x), Skeletool (2x), Rebar, ST300, Kick, Blast, Fuse, Micra (2x), Squirt (3x), Core, Wave, Wingman, Crunch, Mini, Spirit (3x), MP600, Pro Scout, MP700, MP800, Diesel, Powerlock, PowerPlier (2x), PocketPowerPlier (2x), Blacktip (3x), ST6 (2x), 5WR, A100

SAKs:Waiter, Mountaineer, Bantam, Executive, Ambassador, Rambler, Minichamp, Classic SD, Champion, Handyman, Farmer, Explorer, Swisschamp (2x), OHO Soldier, Golf Tool, Wenger S557, 14, Champ, EVO 52, Pocket Tool Chest
Hero Member Posts: 984
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #55 on: November 05, 2016, 07:13:45 PM »
More of the wee ones more recently acquired . . .

Victorinox 74mm Cellidor Prince
The nail file on the Prince (this one and the next one) is magnificent and it's a shame they're not continuing to use it on the current Ambassador and Executive.



Victorinox 74mm Stainless Steel Prince



Victorinox 84mm Alox Excelsior
Takes 84mm minimalism to a new level. At 0.7mm thinner with it's elliptical profile and smaller grid pattern, it makes the oval profile Alox Bantam look large, and yet they're the same physical length.



John

John
Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 37,042
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #56 on: November 06, 2016, 02:43:28 AM »
Some really nice pics in this thread of some fine SAKs :like:

Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,844 Firm believer of Sturgeon's Law
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #57 on: November 06, 2016, 04:34:11 PM »
Same BIG/little combo from these days...


My toys:

MTs: Surge (2x), Skeletool (2x), Rebar, ST300, Kick, Blast, Fuse, Micra (2x), Squirt (3x), Core, Wave, Wingman, Crunch, Mini, Spirit (3x), MP600, Pro Scout, MP700, MP800, Diesel, Powerlock, PowerPlier (2x), PocketPowerPlier (2x), Blacktip (3x), ST6 (2x), 5WR, A100

SAKs:Waiter, Mountaineer, Bantam, Executive, Ambassador, Rambler, Minichamp, Classic SD, Champion, Handyman, Farmer, Explorer, Swisschamp (2x), OHO Soldier, Golf Tool, Wenger S557, 14, Champ, EVO 52, Pocket Tool Chest
Sr. Member Posts: 499 Need more SAKs !
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #58 on: November 06, 2016, 07:55:43 PM »
Same BIG/little combo from these days...

(Image removed from quote.)


Ok.  Getting the Waiter out ...again....

New & Old always a SAK collector
Join Knife Rights
Join The American Legion
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,844 Firm believer of Sturgeon's Law
Re: The Little SAKs
« Reply #59 on: November 06, 2016, 09:04:39 PM »
Same BIG/little combo from these days...

(Image removed from quote.)


Ok.  Getting the Waiter out ...again....

WAIT! ...



for the Waiter. Really nice pick you did there  :cheers:

My toys:

MTs: Surge (2x), Skeletool (2x), Rebar, ST300, Kick, Blast, Fuse, Micra (2x), Squirt (3x), Core, Wave, Wingman, Crunch, Mini, Spirit (3x), MP600, Pro Scout, MP700, MP800, Diesel, Powerlock, PowerPlier (2x), PocketPowerPlier (2x), Blacktip (3x), ST6 (2x), 5WR, A100

SAKs:Waiter, Mountaineer, Bantam, Executive, Ambassador, Rambler, Minichamp, Classic SD, Champion, Handyman, Farmer, Explorer, Swisschamp (2x), OHO Soldier, Golf Tool, Wenger S557, 14, Champ, EVO 52, Pocket Tool Chest

 

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