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Measuring Tools 1505

No Life Club Posts: 1,015
Measuring Tools
« on: January 03, 2019, 10:38:48 PM »
I thought of posting in the Vintage Tools topic, but measuring tools are kind of their own thing, and deserving of their own topic.

These were my grandfather's tools.  I've seen lots of 6 foot folding carpenter's rules (in wood), but this is the first folding metal rule I've seen.

- Steve
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 10,406 Man of Multiple MultiTool Manufacturers
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2019, 10:46:45 PM »
Nice micrometer and metal folding rule! I believe Lufkin made that for Craftsman.  :)

Pontificating particularly pious positions pertaining to polymorphic paraphernalia. G-Man.
No Life Club Posts: 3,149
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2019, 01:07:19 AM »
Lufkin 372 (36 1/2) 12" caliper rule. Divded into eights, tenths, twelfths, and sixteenths of an inch, this is one handy measuring tool for precise work. I think it dates to the 1930s, possibly even the 1920s.  Most I've seen are painted yellow, this is bare boxwood.



Lufkin 966 "Red End" six-foot folding rule. Not that old, but is still USA made, so definitely predates the Apex buyout and outsourcing of the brand to Mexico. These were new-old-stock at a local farm supply store. Definitely worth the $15 they ask. They still have a few if anyone wants one.

Zombie Apprentice Posts: 12,684
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2019, 02:26:11 AM »
Nice!! :like:

Barry
No Life Club Posts: 1,015
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2019, 03:20:08 AM »
Does the left end of that top scale slide out like a caliper?
That Red End is the type of wood folding rule that I'm used to seeing.

- Steve
No Life Club Posts: 3,149
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2019, 03:26:55 AM »
Does the left end of that top scale slide out like a caliper?
That Red End is the type of wood folding rule that I'm used to seeing.

It does. Forgot to upload that photo.  That was actually the whole reason behind me getting it. I saw that a hairdresser my grandmother goes to had one just like it (though newer, as it was yellow), but wasn't interested in selling it, so I got this one.

Zombie Apprentice Posts: 10,406 Man of Multiple MultiTool Manufacturers
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2019, 05:56:54 AM »
Nice Lufkins, Cody! I have a caliper folding rule, but its' condition isn't nearly as good as yours. Still useful though.  :)

Here are some size/distance measuring tools. I left out the more common(or less interesting) stuff like regular ing and such.





Pontificating particularly pious positions pertaining to polymorphic paraphernalia. G-Man.
Global Moderator He Who Has The Most Nuts, Wins! Posts: 55,797
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2019, 12:58:58 PM »
Great measuring devices guys :like: I have several rulers as we bricklayers still use them quite often :tu: I have some older ones as well :cheers:
No Life Club Posts: 1,032

WWW 00

******
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2019, 06:16:22 PM »
Love those folding rulers with the calipers. Lufkin used to make some really good measuring instrument some time ago, or so I was told. Gerleatherberman, that hand vise is such a cute little thing! I've been meaning to get of those!

edit: forgot to attach the picture :P Want NEED to get a die maker's square and a double square, and a combination square, and...
« Last Edit: January 04, 2019, 06:19:42 PM by WWW »
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 10,406 Man of Multiple MultiTool Manufacturers
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2019, 12:06:26 AM »
Nice selection of measures, WWW! :like:

I really like the hand vise as well. It makes a good thickness comparison tool as well. :)

Pontificating particularly pious positions pertaining to polymorphic paraphernalia. G-Man.
No Life Club Posts: 1,271
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2019, 10:38:30 AM »
I thought I'd show a few more specialized ones for machining.

First off a machine level. The precision is far higher than a normal carpenters level. This one is 0,02mm per meter. (In practice one often has to use a normal level first just to get within shooting range of the measureable range).

Then there is a tool setting sensor. It is used to measure the length of machine tools. Important for instance when lowering as the recorded length lets the machine know when it can expect the tool to touch the workpiece. (Mistakes here tends to either make for lots of cutting air or very loud and expensive bangs). Precision down to about 0,002 mm or so.

And the last one here is a 3D touch probe. It gives a very precise measurement of tip movements either upwards or from any side. Used to locate workpieces and features, as well as placing jigs, machine vises or other clamping or reference equipment. Precison about 0.01mm in any direction.

"If only simple wasn't so hard" - me
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
No Life Club Posts: 1,032

WWW 00

******
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #11 on: January 06, 2019, 12:58:51 PM »
I thought I'd show a few more specialized ones for machining.

First off a machine level. The precision is far higher than a normal carpenters level. This one is 0,02mm per meter. (In practice one often has to use a normal level first just to get within shooting range of the measureable range).

Then there is a tool setting sensor. It is used to measure the length of machine tools. Important for instance when lowering as the recorded length lets the machine know when it can expect the tool to touch the workpiece. (Mistakes here tends to either make for lots of cutting air or very loud and expensive bangs). Precision down to about 0,002 mm or so.

And the last one here is a 3D touch probe. It gives a very precise measurement of tip movements either upwards or from any side. Used to locate workpieces and features, as well as placing jigs, machine vises or other clamping or reference equipment. Precison about 0.01mm in any direction.

 :drool: More please!!
No Life Club Posts: 1,271
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #12 on: January 07, 2019, 12:48:22 AM »
:drool: More please!!

Some more then. :cheers: I guess these qualify as hand tools a bit more than the first ones.

First off a pair of digital dial indicators. (Some tasks need more than one). These are combined with various kind of holders to bring them into position, and will then register changes in one direction. Precison somewhere around 0,001mm. They can hold onto minimum or maximum values, and be connected to a computer for those so inclined. (I've never tried or had any use for that).

Being digital they give very precise readings, but sometimes change in itself is more interesting than actually how much the change is. For those situations I prefer the analog style dial indicators. These digital ones do simulate an analog scale too, but something about a dial needle moving is just very straight forward.

Next is an old depth micrometer set. Basically for measuring depth of holes or grooves or similar to a precision of about 0,01mm.

Then there is an internal micrometer set. It expands so one can measure internal distances of stuff. Precision as above.

Last I included two niche ones. Those are screw in hole transfer sets. They are utterly useless 99,99% percent of the time, but when you do need them you really do need them. Say you have some metal part that need to be replaced. Some bush fix back when it was mounted mean that there are no drawings or information about the pattern of the mounting holes. All you got is the threaded holes which the part will be screwed onto later.

Then these are gold - you screw them into the mounting holes, put whatever you'll mount over, and give it some decent hammer action. The hardened tips then make some nice dents where you need to make the mounting holes on the new part. I guess they are not measuring devices as such, but they do away with the need for measuring altogether. That way the lack of documention can be passed on to the next poor smurf to come along next time.  >:D  :facepalm:



« Last Edit: January 07, 2019, 12:52:24 AM by Vidar »

"If only simple wasn't so hard" - me
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 22,453 Plumbers Know Their Crap!!
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #13 on: January 07, 2019, 01:25:51 AM »
Ahhh, two other inside face stick rulers! But there both two ways, mines only an inside face, I hate outside face. I got a few diff measuring tools but I can’t get pics now..
JR

"The-Mad-Plumbarian" The Punisher Of Pipes!!! JR
No Life Club Posts: 1,032

WWW 00

******
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #14 on: January 07, 2019, 03:28:21 AM »
:drool: More please!!

Some more then. :cheers: I guess these qualify as hand tools a bit more than the first ones.

First off a pair of digital dial indicators. (Some tasks need more than one). These are combined with various kind of holders to bring them into position, and will then register changes in one direction. Precison somewhere around 0,001mm. They can hold onto minimum or maximum values, and be connected to a computer for those so inclined. (I've never tried or had any use for that).

Being digital they give very precise readings, but sometimes change in itself is more interesting than actually how much the change is. For those situations I prefer the analog style dial indicators. These digital ones do simulate an analog scale too, but something about a dial needle moving is just very straight forward.

Next is an old depth micrometer set. Basically for measuring depth of holes or grooves or similar to a precision of about 0,01mm.

Then there is an internal micrometer set. It expands so one can measure internal distances of stuff. Precision as above.

Last I included two niche ones. Those are screw in hole transfer sets. They are utterly useless 99,99% percent of the time, but when you do need them you really do need them. Say you have some metal part that need to be replaced. Some bush fix back when it was mounted mean that there are no drawings or information about the pattern of the mounting holes. All you got is the threaded holes which the part will be screwed onto later.

Then these are gold - you screw them into the mounting holes, put whatever you'll mount over, and give it some decent hammer action. The hardened tips then make some nice dents where you need to make the mounting holes on the new part. I guess they are not measuring devices as such, but they do away with the need for measuring altogether. That way the lack of documention can be passed on to the next poor smurf to come along next time.  >:D  :facepalm:

Need to get some tranfer punches. Super usefull, in university we had to machine a little bottle hydraulic jack. I wish I had some tranfer puches to locate some of the holes, they turned out so far off that we had to enlarge some of them in order to make it work. Thanks for the pics, they are (both tools and the photography) really nice!!!
No Life Club Posts: 1,271
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #15 on: January 07, 2019, 01:13:17 PM »
Thanks for the pics, they are (both tools and the photography) really nice!!!

The first set of photos had some orrible white balance issues though. For the second set I corrected for that. Hm. I guess that photo color thing is a measurement device too. :think:

"If only simple wasn't so hard" - me
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 10,406 Man of Multiple MultiTool Manufacturers
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #16 on: January 07, 2019, 05:16:35 PM »
That's some sweet kit, Vidar! :drool:

Pontificating particularly pious positions pertaining to polymorphic paraphernalia. G-Man.
No Life Club Posts: 1,271
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #17 on: January 07, 2019, 06:07:04 PM »
I figure the photo measuring stuff is relevant enough for this thread? Usually when I take photos I just correct for white balance and nudge the in-camera exposure a bit if it is off - that works fine for almost everything. But for those rare occasions when it isn't I have two measurement helpers to take technically proper photos.

One is a light meter. Instead of me or the camera trying to estimate how much light hits a certain place this removes the guesswork - place the thing where you need a correct exposure and it will measure the actual light there and give the correct setting to you. (In the off case anyone from Sekonic would ever read this: That power button is very badly placed, and the pouch doesn't protect it either. So more times than not it has kept turning on during storage or carry and shows up powerless when needed. I've now resorted to removing the battery when not in use).

The other is a color and white balance reference card. If you take a photo of that facing the camera under the same light as you'll use later it will give you a handy reference for white balance and color corrections. One can usually clearly see the difference when one compare before and after such corrections.

« Last Edit: January 07, 2019, 06:09:40 PM by Vidar »

"If only simple wasn't so hard" - me
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
No Life Club Posts: 1,271
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #18 on: January 07, 2019, 06:16:47 PM »
Back to some more tool like measurement devices. The first one can be used for 90 and 45 degrees angles, but its main purpose is as a center finder at the end of round cylinders or the like. The inside 90 degree is pushed up against the cylinder face and one draws a line along the straight bit. Then the cylinder or tool is turned somewhat, the operation repeated, and the cylinder center is where the lines cross.

The last photo is of variations of combined length measure and marking from an edge. Great for making parallell lines or marks a given distance from straight or outside curved edges, or in the bottom case also inside curves edges.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2019, 06:18:06 PM by Vidar »

"If only simple wasn't so hard" - me
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
No Life Club Posts: 1,271
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #19 on: January 07, 2019, 06:45:14 PM »
That's some sweet kit, Vidar! :drool:

You have some really nice stuff yourself up there in the thread I see!  :tu: :cheers:

"If only simple wasn't so hard" - me
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 22,453 Plumbers Know Their Crap!!
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #20 on: January 07, 2019, 06:48:43 PM »
From 6” to 100’ Theres 11, 12 if you count the workstation mat which has come in handy at times, I used that scale ruler throughout 7yrs in schools, I had a aluminum one but it disappeared, you can see it’s little baby brother underneath it, that faxmax and stick ruler have seen the most field time, but for the last 10yrs the only ones that have been used are those rulers or that dinky plain 12ft tape measure..
JR

"The-Mad-Plumbarian" The Punisher Of Pipes!!! JR
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 10,406 Man of Multiple MultiTool Manufacturers
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #21 on: January 07, 2019, 07:18:53 PM »
You have some really nice stuff yourself up there in the thread I see!  :tu: :cheers:
Thank you, Vidar! :cheers:

A lot of my gear is old-school. It doesn't quite measure up to your precision kit. :D

Pontificating particularly pious positions pertaining to polymorphic paraphernalia. G-Man.
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 10,406 Man of Multiple MultiTool Manufacturers
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #22 on: January 07, 2019, 07:19:29 PM »
From 6” to 100’ Theres 11, 12 if you count the workstation mat which has come in handy at times, I used that scale ruler throughout 7yrs in schools, I had a aluminum one but it disappeared, you can see it’s little baby brother underneath it, that faxmax and stick ruler have seen the most field time, but for the last 10yrs the only ones that have been used are those rulers or that dinky plain 12ft tape measure..
JR
Cool! That setup will take care of most measuring scenarios. :like:

Pontificating particularly pious positions pertaining to polymorphic paraphernalia. G-Man.
Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 22,453 Plumbers Know Their Crap!!
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #23 on: January 07, 2019, 07:41:33 PM »
From 6” to 100’ Theres 11, 12 if you count the workstation mat which has come in handy at times, I used that scale ruler throughout 7yrs in schools, I had a aluminum one but it disappeared, you can see it’s little baby brother underneath it, that faxmax and stick ruler have seen the most field time, but for the last 10yrs the only ones that have been used are those rulers or that dinky plain 12ft tape measure..
JR
Cool! That setup will take care of most measuring scenarios. :like:
I would think so, I didn’t put my sewing tape measure, I wish that micrometer wasn’t digital of course there’s always the adjustable wrench, :whistle:
I also had a little metal pocket one with a clip, but I’ve lost so much, let’s not forget everyone’s scale on the sak!
I like that little hobby one you posted in the pocket dump!
JR

"The-Mad-Plumbarian" The Punisher Of Pipes!!! JR
No Life Club Posts: 1,271
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #24 on: January 07, 2019, 09:05:28 PM »
A lot of my gear is old-school. It doesn't quite measure up to your precision kit. :D

Old-school still in use tend to work very well. I think of it as designs that have proven themselves over time. Not to mention that many old tools seem to have superior build quality compared to many of todays price cut minimum viable options. (I guess there is a bias there as those well built tools are the ones still around and in use - the price "optimized" tools of earlier are simple not around anymore..?)

As for the precision I think it is simply more a matter of different tools for different work. We tend to get what is best suited or needed for the work at hand. (I think some of those precision tools would be quite useless or ineffective working with wood for instance).

I hadn't seen those foldable caliper rulers before I saw this thread with you and Cody. Those were interesting. :cheers: What is the dial meter next to your micrometer?

"If only simple wasn't so hard" - me
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
No Life Club Posts: 1,416
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #25 on: January 07, 2019, 09:11:45 PM »
A few from me  :tu: , had it not been for this thread i wouldn't have noticed rust starting on a couple of them  :-[

No Life Club Posts: 1,271
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #26 on: January 07, 2019, 09:23:17 PM »
I tried finding one of my more interesting measurement pieces, but I guess I might have used it for pranks one time too many and it suffered the consequences...

Anyway, if you ever want to prank anyone to the brink of measurement and cutting insanity then get a shrinkage ruler and throw it in the normal mix. A shrinkage ruler is used for various casting and ceramics work where shrinkage is a factor from workpiece to the final product. These rulers are slightly longer so that the final measurement after shrinkage will be correct. Thus a ruler reading 50cm might actually be 52cm - I think you can see the level of confusion and frustration this can lead to for the uninitiated...  >:D :angel:

(A friend once came across a young worker that was busy checking different measurement tools against each other: "Because some of these cheap ones seem to have cut back on the centimeters to save material costs!" :D)

« Last Edit: January 07, 2019, 09:27:47 PM by Vidar »

"If only simple wasn't so hard" - me
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
No Life Club Posts: 1,271
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #27 on: January 07, 2019, 09:26:41 PM »
A few from me  :tu: , had it not been for this thread i wouldn't have noticed rust starting on a couple of them  :-[

(Image removed from quote.)

To my horror I found a spec or two of rust myself too! This thread is a life safer!

Those absolute calipers are great!  :cheers:

"If only simple wasn't so hard" - me
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
No Life Club Posts: 1,032

WWW 00

******
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #28 on: January 07, 2019, 10:23:28 PM »
Nice mics Borg!! :like:
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 10,406 Man of Multiple MultiTool Manufacturers
Re: Measuring Tools
« Reply #29 on: January 07, 2019, 10:42:12 PM »
A lot of my gear is old-school. It doesn't quite measure up to your precision kit. :D

Old-school still in use tend to work very well. I think of it as designs that have proven themselves over time. Not to mention that many old tools seem to have superior build quality compared to many of todays price cut minimum viable options. (I guess there is a bias there as those well built tools are the ones still around and in use - the price "optimized" tools of earlier are simple not around anymore..?)

As for the precision I think it is simply more a matter of different tools for different work. We tend to get what is best suited or needed for the work at hand. (I think some of those precision tools would be quite useless or ineffective working with wood for instance).

I hadn't seen those foldable caliper rulers before I saw this thread with you and Cody. Those were interesting. :cheers: What is the dial meter next to your micrometer?
Very true. A decent caliper and square are almost all I ever need for wood work and most antiques restoration.
That is a distance measure with a tiny wheel that is geared to show the distance on the dial.  Not sure of the proper name for it though.  :think:

Here are a couple of fun measurement devices. The Craftsman uses sonic pulses tp measure distances. Of course the material bouncing the pulse back can be a problem for the system. It is almost always unreliable at best. The yellow one uses roller wheels and is impractical for accurate measurements. Both were neat yard sale finds.  :)
Also, a couple of combination squares.






Pontificating particularly pious positions pertaining to polymorphic paraphernalia. G-Man.

 

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