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Lets talk iconic knives. 2270

Global Moderator Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,103
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #150 on: January 13, 2019, 04:04:43 AM »
Many of us knife people have people in our lives who have heard us talk about our knives or knives we want.  We have showed them our knives or knives we want.  We have discussed knives till their eyes glazed over.  They have seen "most" of our knife collection as we ramble on about traits, edge geometry, handle scales, purpose, etc. 

What I propose is this.  Make a list of knives.  Ask this person if they are familiar with each knife on the list.  They don't have to know a particular brand or model name/number just what the knife looks like.  Any knife they can readily identify goes on your ( A ) list and any they cannot identify goes on your ( B ) list. 

I just did this with my partner and she was able to identify all but the Sodbuster and Puukko.  What I did was ask her " Do know any knife on this list?"  I then asked "Can you give me a basic description of this knife?"  With the Sodbuster she had no clue.  I then showed her both Sodbusters I have and she said "Oh, yes I know that knife but didn't know it was called that."  I personally would add this to my  ( B ) list.  The Puukko was similar however when I said the Mora Classic was similar to the Puukko she asked why both made the list.  Puuko would be added to my ( B ). 

She is a Spyderco fan.  She asked why Spyderco wasn't on the list.  I asked her which particular knife?  She paused and said the Brand like Victorinox/Wenger is iconic and not a particular knife.  I asked her which SAK to her would be iconic.  She carries a 58mm Midnight Minichamp daily on her work lanyard.  She said no one knife is iconic to her.  She said a red scaled multi bladed pocket knife with shield was what was iconic to her.

It was interesting to hear her take on this.  I would certainly call her average knife person +.  Plus (+) because I have multiple knives and talk about knives with her till her eyes glaze over  :facepalm: :rofl:     

What say you?  Sound like a good idea?  Certainly don't want to get anyone in trouble  :whistle:.   

Esse Quam Videri
No Life Club Posts: 4,386 Geometry cuts but the steel determines how long.
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #151 on: January 13, 2019, 03:27:06 PM »
I'm not going there.
If I layed out a pile of knives and asked the wife or daughter which one they think is classic. Eyes would roll and glaze over and they would look at me and say how many smurfin knives do you need.  They don't get it at all.  :(

Having little to no knowledge of European knives, I will suggest that the boy scout knife might be included as a classic american icon.
A lot of people grew up on this knife as their first knife. it's a pattern they still offer.

Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,730

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Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #152 on: January 13, 2019, 03:29:25 PM »
 :iagree:

(Sweet Scout, Dean!  :like:)
Global Moderator Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,103
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #153 on: January 13, 2019, 04:41:42 PM »
 :rofl:  fair enough. 

Lets carry on then  :salute:.

PLEASE HELP WITH THE GUIDLINES.  Once we get a better working set of guidelines we can get back to the fun of picking knives for a list. 

1. Easily and readily recognizable model/style/pattern/Brand.  I think we have to include Brand, see below.           

2. Knife must currently produced.  Sorry no one offs or discontinued models.   

3.       

4.

5.   

 
Some things to consider.
 
There is no prerequisite to own the knife.

You do not need to know its origins or history.  Many knives evolved to become what they are today.  Unfortunately the predecessor doesn't always get the credit or become popular enough to stand the test of time ( stay in production ). 
 
You do not need to know particular makers.  Examples are the Bowie knife, Barlow pattern.
 
Knowing a specific model isn't important as some Brands have become iconic vs specific models.  Because some Brands have done such a brilliant job at producing a wide array of models there are several models within the Brand that define the Brand.  The Brand therefor has become iconic over specific models within the Brand.

One example is the Swiss Army Knife.   With the vast array of models from both Victorinox and Wenger there wont be ONE single knife that'll stand out for everyone.  The Brand has become iconic,  particular features such as red plastic scales, multiple implements, and the shield are what identify the knife to the Brand.  They have become one and the same.

Another example to me is both the Mora and Opinel.  For some the Mora is both the Classic red handled knife and to others its the plastic Companion style while to others its both.  When we say Mora for those that know the knife/s, rarely is a specific model called by name.  The Brand has become the icon within the knife community.

Opinel is much the same to me as both Victorinox/Wenger and Mora.  Opinel has many models denoted by number.  Most just say Opinel knife.  We know instinctively the knifes features without regard to the knife number.

I'd say Spyderco is or has done the same.  No one model stands our for everyone however the Brand is widely known within the knife community.  Is the Delica the stand out?  Or is it the Endura?  Maybe the Paramilitary 2 is?  Much like the above mentioned knives when someone says Spyderco within the knife community instinctively we envision features and for some specific models.  This Brand like the ones mentioned above has become known for many models yet no one for everyone stands out over the Brand. 

To contrast this I as well as others suggested the Bowie, Balisong, and Barlow.  Which Brand stand out for any of these?  These are styles of knives that are easy to identify for most knife people because of certain features irrespective of Brand/Makers.  I suggested the Puukko.  I strongly feel this knife deserves a place on the list.  However the STYLE of knife is whats iconic and no one Brand stands out across the board. 

           

Esse Quam Videri
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Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #154 on: January 13, 2019, 04:45:51 PM »
'No discontinued models' is a tough rule for me. I know this is going backwards, but... is the Barlow still in production?  Case has plans for one. Maybe some custom makers make them still. Maybe GEC (I'm not sure).  But what if nobody still made a Barlow?

There is no way I can go along with a definition of 'Iconic' that excludes the Barlow.   :td:
No Life Club Posts: 4,386 Geometry cuts but the steel determines how long.
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #155 on: January 13, 2019, 07:55:23 PM »
'No discontinued models' is a tough rule for me. I know this is going backwards, but... is the Barlow still in production?  Case has plans for one. Maybe some custom makers make them still. Maybe GEC (I'm not sure).  But what if nobody still made a Barlow?

There is no way I can go along with a definition of 'Iconic' that excludes the Barlow.   :td:
:rofl:
Not to worry they are still in production.  :D GEC for one spits them out on a regular basis.

Global Moderator Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,103
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #156 on: January 15, 2019, 03:50:08 PM »
Swiss Army Knife.  * Not model specific. Victorinox and for many Wenger both have become synonymous with the little red knife.   
     
Buck 110               
Opinel.  * Not model specific.  Even tho there are several sizes available The Opinel knife with over a hundred year history is simply Opinel, company, model, inverter/maker.
   
Mora.  *  Not model specific.  Like many great knife companies this one is 125 young and counting.  The Morakniv is recognized and known in its many iterations.  Classic, Companion, and the newer models. 
 
Laguiole.  *  Style.  Sometimes a knife becomes its own thing.  While the history suggests influences this style knife is its own thing. 

Sodbuster.  * Not brand specific.  This one is tricky.  The name is a trademark of Case.  The pattern is much older than the trademark.  To which wonderful country do we thank for this terrific pattern? 
 
Bowie knife.  * Style specific.  What we know as the knife Jim Bowie carried. 
 
Balisong/butterfly knife.  *  I'm not even going to touch on its origins.  Most Americans know it as the "butterfly knife".
   
USMC KaBar fighting knife/1219C2 Combat Knife/USMC Mark 2/U.S. Navy utility knife, Mark 2.  *  This knife seems to be offically called a few things.  The knife design being 70 plus years old probably best known as a USMC knife. 

Stiletto/Switchblade.    *  Any knife that seems to be banned across a wide range of countries gets my vote.  Is this the most banned knife?  Italian Stiletto Switchblade is what some call it while others including myself just refer to it as Switchblade.  Its the knife that many relate to 50s in the US as seen in movies and subsequently banned shortly thereabouts.       

Barlow.  *  Style/Pattern.  Good luck nailing down the origins.   Obadiah Barlow of Sheffield, England, around 1670 seems to be widely regarded as its origins.  Luke Furnace of Stannington is another name that'll pop up in most searches.  The John Russell Company is an American company that is likely responsible for mass producing this terrific pattern en mass in the US.     

Rambo knife.   * I am no longer sure this makes the cut ( no pun intended ).

Khukuri.  *  Whatever the inspiration, whatever the origins, this knife is emblematic of the Gurkhas and Nepalese culture.  Any blade that is so highly revered has got to make this list.       

 

Esse Quam Videri
Global Moderator Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,103
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #157 on: January 15, 2019, 04:23:12 PM »
PLEASE HELP WITH THE GUIDELINES.
   
1. Easily and readily recognizable Model/Style/Pattern/Brand.           

2. Knife must be currently produced.   

3  Has stood the test of time.  Has the knife played a great historical role or is part of a cultural identity?  Is the knife a symbol of national pride?     

4.  A knife that is emblematic of a style/pattern/Brand.  * While some knives evolve over time to become what they are today.  Certain knives regardless of origin or inspiration become their own.  Parallel development sometimes is the reason for knives of seemingly similar DNA.

Am I getting close? 



           

Esse Quam Videri
Global Moderator Point Of No Return Posts: 37,713
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #158 on: January 15, 2019, 04:39:43 PM »
Does it really need to be currently produced to be iconic ?
Global Moderator Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,103
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #159 on: January 15, 2019, 04:41:31 PM »
Swiss Army Knife.  * Not model specific. Victorinox and for many Wenger both have become synonymous with the little red knife.   
     
Buck 110
               
Opinel.  * Not model specific.  Even tho there are several sizes available The Opinel knife with over a hundred year history is simply Opinel, company, model, inverter/maker.
   
Mora.  *  Not model specific.  Like many great knife companies this one is 125 young and counting.  The Morakniv is recognized and known in its many iterations.  Classic, Companion, and the newer models. 
 
Laguiole.  *  Style.  Sometimes a knife becomes its own thing.  While the history suggests influences this style knife is its own thing. 

Sodbuster.  * Not brand specific.  This one is tricky.  The name is a trademark of Case.  The pattern is much older than the trademark.  To which wonderful country do we thank for this terrific pattern? 
 
Bowie knife.  * Style specific.  What we know as the knife Jim Bowie carried. 
 
Balisong/butterfly knife.  *  I'm not even going to touch on its origins.  Most Americans know it as the "butterfly knife".
   
USMC KaBar fighting knife/1219C2 Combat Knife/USMC Mark 2/U.S. Navy utility knife, Mark 2.  *  This knife seems to be offically called a few things.  The knife design being 70 plus years old probably best known as a USMC knife. 

Stiletto/Switchblade.    *  Any knife that seems to be banned across a wide range of countries gets my vote.  Is this the most banned knife?  Italian Stiletto Switchblade is what some call it while others including myself just refer to it as Switchblade.  Its the knife that many relate to 50s in the US as seen in movies and subsequently banned shortly thereabouts.       

Barlow.  *  Style/Pattern.  Good luck nailing down the origins.   Obadiah Barlow of Sheffield, England, around 1670 seems to be widely regarded as its origins.  Luke Furnace of Stannington is another name that'll pop up in most searches.  The John Russell Company is an American company that is likely responsible for mass producing this terrific pattern en mass in the US.     

Rambo knife.   * I am no longer sure this makes the cut ( no pun intended ).

Khukuri.  *  Whatever the inspiration, whatever the origins, this knife is emblematic of the Gurkhas and Nepalese culture.  Any blade that is so highly revered has got to make this list.       

 

Puukko.  * While all Puukko are knives, not all knives are Puukkos.  I really like this.  I see this phrasing pop up often. There is a description of what a Puukko traditionally is however I would defer to our Finnish members on that.  I will say there is a Puukko for almost every task, woodwork, hunting, fishing, chopping, vegetables. and more. 

 

Esse Quam Videri
Global Moderator Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,103
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #160 on: January 15, 2019, 04:46:22 PM »
Does it really need to be currently produced to be iconic ?

I really struggle with this and I think #2 could be omitted then.   I think #2 has to go.   Historic and historically relevant knives certainly have to make the list whether they are currently produced or not.   

PLEASE HELP WITH THE GUIDELINES.
   
1. Easily and readily recognizable Model/Style/Pattern/Brand.           

2. Knife must be currently produced.   

3  Has stood the test of time.  Has the knife played a great historical role or is part of a cultural identity?  Is the knife a symbol of national pride?     

4.  A knife that is emblematic of a style/pattern/Brand.  * While some knives evolve over time to become what they are today.  Certain knives regardless of origin or inspiration become their own.  Parallel development sometimes is the reason for knives of seemingly similar DNA.

Am I getting close? 



           
« Last Edit: January 15, 2019, 04:50:59 PM by Aloha007 »

Esse Quam Videri
No Life Club Posts: 4,386 Geometry cuts but the steel determines how long.
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #161 on: January 15, 2019, 04:51:45 PM »
Does it really need to be currently produced to be iconic ?
If it's not currently being produced, wouldn't that make it historic rather than iconic?

Global Moderator Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,103
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #162 on: January 15, 2019, 04:53:58 PM »
1.  Easily and readily recognizable Model/Style/Pattern/Brand.           

2.  The knife played a great historical role.

3.  The knife is part of a cultural identity. 

4.  The knife is a symbol of national pride.     

5.  A knife that is emblematic of a style/pattern/Brand.  * While some knives evolve over time to become what they are today.  Certain knives regardless of origin or inspiration become their own.  Parallel development sometimes is the reason for knives of seemingly similar DNA.

Esse Quam Videri
Global Moderator Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,103
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #163 on: January 15, 2019, 05:01:59 PM »
Does it really need to be currently produced to be iconic ?
If it's not currently being produced, wouldn't that make it historic rather than iconic?

I tried this route however historic and historical cause more confusion.

I like this way of describing the use of the two words,

The word "historic" refers to any event, object, or place that is considered an important part of history. It is the more selective of the two terms.

The word "historical" refers to anything and everything that has happened in or is connected to the past, no matter its level of importance.


Oxford definition.  Historic and historical are used in slightly different ways. Historic means ‘famous or important in history’, as in a historic occasion, whereas historical means ‘concerning history or historical events’, as in historical evidence; thus a historic event is one that was very important, whereas a historical event is something that happened in the past.
 

Esse Quam Videri
No Life Club Posts: 4,386 Geometry cuts but the steel determines how long.
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #164 on: January 15, 2019, 05:03:15 PM »
Swiss Army Knife.  * Not model specific. Victorinox and for many Wenger both have become synonymous with the little red knife.   
     
Buck 110
               
Opinel.  * Not model specific.  Even tho there are several sizes available The Opinel knife with over a hundred year history is simply Opinel, company, model, inverter/maker.
   
Mora.  *  Not model specific.  Like many great knife companies this one is 125 young and counting.  The Morakniv is recognized and known in its many iterations.  Classic, Companion, and the newer models. 
 
Laguiole.  *  Style.  Sometimes a knife becomes its own thing.  While the history suggests influences this style knife is its own thing. 

Sodbuster.  * Not brand specific.  This one is tricky.  The name is a trademark of Case.  The pattern is much older than the trademark.  To which wonderful country do we thank for this terrific pattern? 
 
Bowie knife.  * Style specific.  What we know as the knife Jim Bowie carried. 
 
Balisong/butterfly knife.  *  I'm not even going to touch on its origins.  Most Americans know it as the "butterfly knife".
   
USMC KaBar fighting knife/1219C2 Combat Knife/USMC Mark 2/U.S. Navy utility knife, Mark 2.  *  This knife seems to be offically called a few things.  The knife design being 70 plus years old probably best known as a USMC knife. 

Stiletto/Switchblade.    *  Any knife that seems to be banned across a wide range of countries gets my vote.  Is this the most banned knife?  Italian Stiletto Switchblade is what some call it while others including myself just refer to it as Switchblade.  Its the knife that many relate to 50s in the US as seen in movies and subsequently banned shortly thereabouts.       

Barlow.  *  Style/Pattern.  Good luck nailing down the origins.   Obadiah Barlow of Sheffield, England, around 1670 seems to be widely regarded as its origins.  Luke Furnace of Stannington is another name that'll pop up in most searches.  The John Russell Company is an American company that is likely responsible for mass producing this terrific pattern en mass in the US.     

Rambo knife.   * I am no longer sure this makes the cut ( no pun intended ).

Khukuri.  *  Whatever the inspiration, whatever the origins, this knife is emblematic of the Gurkhas and Nepalese culture.  Any blade that is so highly revered has got to make this list.       

 

Puukko.  * While all Puukko are knives, not all knives are Puukkos.  I really like this.  I see this phrasing pop up often. There is a description of what a Puukko traditionally is however I would defer to our Finnish members on that.  I will say there is a Puukko for almost every task, woodwork, hunting, fishing, chopping, vegetables. and more.

Opinel.  * Not model specific.  Even tho there are several sizes available The Opinel knife with over a hundred year history is simply Opinel, company, model, inverter/maker.
I understand Opiniel because it's basically different sizes of the same knife.
   
Mora.  *  Not model specific.  Like many great knife companies this one is 125 young and counting.  The Morakniv is recognized and known in its many iterations.  Classic, Companion, and the newer models.
If Mora is not known for a specific knife, then you are saying it is known as a company.  If that's the case you would have to include Spyderco, they're not known for a specific knife but a style. There are other companies that would have to be included as well.
 :think:
Maybe when you narrow it down to a single knife there aren't that many icons out there.

Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,730

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Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #165 on: January 15, 2019, 05:10:13 PM »
If it's not currently being produced, wouldn't that make it historic rather than iconic?

No reason a knife couldn't be both.

The "Kentucky Rifle" aka the "Pennsylvania Rifle" is iconic, but not in production. It's certainly a historic rifle, too.
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,730

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Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #166 on: January 15, 2019, 05:12:32 PM »
Opinel.  * Not model specific.  Even tho there are several sizes available The Opinel knife with over a hundred year history is simply Opinel, company, model, inverter/maker.
I understand Opiniel because it's basically different sizes of the same knife.
   
Mora.  *  Not model specific.  Like many great knife companies this one is 125 young and counting.  The Morakniv is recognized and known in its many iterations.  Classic, Companion, and the newer models.
If Mora is not known for a specific knife, then you are saying it is known as a company.  If that's the case you would have to include Spyderco, they're not known for a specific knife but a style. There are other companies that would have to be included as well.
 :think:
Maybe when you narrow it down to a single knife there aren't that many icons out there.

I'd agree with you there: If Mora is Iconic, then would not Buck, Sabatier, Case, Wilkinson, etc... also be 'Iconic'.   :think:
Global Moderator Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,103
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #167 on: January 15, 2019, 05:17:33 PM »
I would agree about Spyderco.  Its certainly known by features specific to the Brand.  In an early post I tried to compare it to Mora, Opinel, Swiss Army Knife as having become more than a single knife model/style.  Its a Spyderco!   :D

Lets add Spyderco to the list.   :tu:


Swiss Army Knife.  * Not model specific. Victorinox and for many Wenger both have become synonymous with the little red knife.   
     
Buck 110
               
Opinel.  * Not model specific.  Even tho there are several sizes available The Opinel knife with over a hundred year history is simply Opinel, company, model, inverter/maker.
   
Mora.  *  Not model specific.  Like many great knife companies this one is 125 young and counting.  The Morakniv is recognized and known in its many iterations.  Classic, Companion, and the newer models. 
 
Laguiole.  *  Style.  Sometimes a knife becomes its own thing.  While the history suggests influences this style knife is its own thing. 

Sodbuster.  * Not brand specific.  This one is tricky.  The name is a trademark of Case.  The pattern is much older than the trademark.  To which wonderful country do we thank for this terrific pattern? 
 
Bowie knife.  * Style specific.  What we know as the knife Jim Bowie carried. 
 
Balisong/butterfly knife.  *  I'm not even going to touch on its origins.  Most Americans know it as the "butterfly knife".
   
USMC KaBar fighting knife/1219C2 Combat Knife/USMC Mark 2/U.S. Navy utility knife, Mark 2.  *  This knife seems to be offically called a few things.  The knife design being 70 plus years old probably best known as a USMC knife. 

Stiletto/Switchblade.    *  Any knife that seems to be banned across a wide range of countries gets my vote.  Is this the most banned knife?  Italian Stiletto Switchblade is what some call it while others including myself just refer to it as Switchblade.  Its the knife that many relate to 50s in the US as seen in movies and subsequently banned shortly thereabouts.       

Barlow.  *  Style/Pattern.  Good luck nailing down the origins.   Obadiah Barlow of Sheffield, England, around 1670 seems to be widely regarded as its origins.  Luke Furnace of Stannington is another name that'll pop up in most searches.  The John Russell Company is an American company that is likely responsible for mass producing this terrific pattern en mass in the US.     

Rambo knife.   * I am no longer sure this makes the cut ( no pun intended ).

Khukuri.  *  Whatever the inspiration, whatever the origins, this knife is emblematic of the Gurkhas and Nepalese culture.  Any blade that is so highly revered has got to make this list.       

Puukko.  * While all Puukko are knives, not all knives are Puukkos.  I really like this.  I see this phrasing pop up often. There is a description of what a Puukko traditionally is however I would defer to our Finnish members on that.  I will say there is a Puukko for almost every task, woodwork, hunting, fishing, chopping, vegetables. and more.

Spyderco  * Not model specific.   This Brand has done what all great brand have, become known for its style and features.  The hole in the blade, the blade shape, pocket clip, Spyder logo, all have come to be known as a Spyderco knife.  They have a wide range of knives from pocket knives to fixed blades.  They work with a wide range of knife makers and in house designers.  They are made in many places around the world.  The features of this brand are what are easily recognizable.         

Esse Quam Videri
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Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #168 on: January 15, 2019, 05:23:14 PM »
 :iagree:

The Rambo knife seems like an Iconic movie prop.

However...if I saw three similar knives, I don't think I'd be able to pick out the actual Rambo Knife. 

And I think he had a different knife in every movie.....so....just how iconic is any one of the Rambo knives?
No Life Club Posts: 4,386 Geometry cuts but the steel determines how long.
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #169 on: January 15, 2019, 05:26:32 PM »
If it's not currently being produced, wouldn't that make it historic rather than iconic?

No reason a knife couldn't be both.

The "Kentucky Rifle" aka the "Pennsylvania Rifle" is iconic, but not in production. It's certainly a historic rifle, too.
The Kentucky Rifle" aka the "Pennsylvania Rifle are still in production for traditional shooters of muzzle loader. aka the Pedersoli Kentucky Flintlock

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Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #170 on: January 15, 2019, 05:36:27 PM »
If it's not currently being produced, wouldn't that make it historic rather than iconic?

No reason a knife couldn't be both.

The "Kentucky Rifle" aka the "Pennsylvania Rifle" is iconic, but not in production. It's certainly a historic rifle, too.
The Kentucky Rifle" aka the "Pennsylvania Rifle are still in production for traditional shooters of muzzle loader. aka the Pedersoli Kentucky Flintlock

True...it can still be had. I've got one. But.....they aren't in production in the sense they are being actively made for purposes of hunting and revolution.
No Life Club Posts: 4,386 Geometry cuts but the steel determines how long.
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #171 on: January 15, 2019, 05:37:06 PM »
I'm not trying to complicate things but maybe it can't be simple.
Multiple lists are needed.
Iconic knives that have stood the test of time, mostly unchanged.
Iconic companies known for a style of knife or knives.
Historical. The Roman sword and the first lock back, both gone but brought in a change in knives or history.
 

No Life Club Posts: 4,386 Geometry cuts but the steel determines how long.
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #172 on: January 15, 2019, 05:38:44 PM »
If it's not currently being produced, wouldn't that make it historic rather than iconic?

No reason a knife couldn't be both.

The "Kentucky Rifle" aka the "Pennsylvania Rifle" is iconic, but not in production. It's certainly a historic rifle, too.
The Kentucky Rifle" aka the "Pennsylvania Rifle are still in production for traditional shooters of muzzle loader. aka the Pedersoli Kentucky Flintlock

True...it can still be had. I've got one. But.....they aren't in production in the sense they are being actively made for purposes of hunting and revolution.
well not for revolution but there are a very few who still hunt them.

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Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #173 on: January 15, 2019, 05:41:49 PM »
True.

And some people still drive a Model-T. And there are still a few Macintoshes in use....

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Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #174 on: January 15, 2019, 05:43:56 PM »

Iconic knives that have stood the test of time, mostly unchanged.


I do think a knife needs a bit of history behind it before it could be considered 'Iconic'.

It's hard to see how a brand new knife, however, interesting or exciting, could be iconic.
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Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #175 on: January 15, 2019, 06:01:06 PM »
For many, the Rambo knife started the(ir) whole survival knife craze/fashion.
The large blade, saw (irrespective of usefulness) the secret compartment, the idea that you could defeat anybody and survive with just that/a tool.

It encouraged people to get into knives, making them cool.

This is also valid for the Crocodile Dundee knife, I think.


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Global Moderator Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,103
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #176 on: January 15, 2019, 06:11:16 PM »
1.  Easily and readily recognizable Model/Style/Pattern/Brand.           

2.  The knife played a great historical role.

3.  The knife is part of a cultural identity. 

4.  The knife is a symbol of national pride.     

5.  A knife that is emblematic of a style/pattern/Brand.  * While some knives evolve over time to become what they are today.  Certain knives regardless of origin or inspiration become their own.  Parallel development sometimes is the reason for knives of seemingly similar DNA.

Guidelines.  I think we're getting close  :think:

Esse Quam Videri
Global Moderator Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,103
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #177 on: January 15, 2019, 06:14:50 PM »
For many, the Rambo knife started the(ir) whole survival knife craze/fashion.
The large blade, saw (irrespective of usefulness) the secret compartment, the idea that you could defeat anybody and survive with just that/a tool.

It encouraged people to get into knives, making them cool.

This is also valid for the Crocodile Dundee knife, I think.

The Rambo knife is  :think:   Yes for many the knife is a large knife with serrated spine and secret compartment in the handle.  All other specific features aside and this is what is conjured up when Rambo knife if mentioned.  To those who are more astute, well  :hatsoff:.  Good real dks  :salute:.  This is certainly a famous knife in the movie sense.  It certainly was a mass produced knife for those looking to recreate their own Rambo fantasy. 

Esse Quam Videri
Global Moderator Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,103
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #178 on: January 15, 2019, 06:17:18 PM »
I know there will be discussion but for now how are we looking?  Shall we add swords and really turn the volume up  :whistle:

ThePeacent where are you? 

Swiss Army Knife.  * Not model specific. Victorinox and for many Wenger both have become synonymous with the little red knife.   
     
Buck 110
               
Opinel.  * Not model specific.  Even tho there are several sizes available The Opinel knife with over a hundred year history is simply Opinel, company, model, inverter/maker.
   
Mora.  *  Not model specific.  Like many great knife companies this one is 125 young and counting.  The Morakniv is recognized and known in its many iterations.  Classic, Companion, and the newer models. 
 
Laguiole.  *  Style.  Sometimes a knife becomes its own thing.  While the history suggests influences this style knife is its own thing. 

Sodbuster.  * Not brand specific.  This one is tricky.  The name is a trademark of Case.  The pattern is much older than the trademark.  To which wonderful country do we thank for this terrific pattern? 
 
Bowie knife.  * Style specific.  What we know as the knife Jim Bowie carried. 
 
Balisong/butterfly knife.  *  I'm not even going to touch on its origins.  Most Americans know it as the "butterfly knife".
   
USMC KaBar fighting knife/1219C2 Combat Knife/USMC Mark 2/U.S. Navy utility knife, Mark 2.  *  This knife seems to be offically called a few things.  The knife design being 70 plus years old probably best known as a USMC knife. 

Stiletto/Switchblade.    *  Any knife that seems to be banned across a wide range of countries gets my vote.  Is this the most banned knife?  Italian Stiletto Switchblade is what some call it while others including myself just refer to it as Switchblade.  Its the knife that many relate to 50s in the US as seen in movies and subsequently banned shortly thereabouts.       

Barlow.  *  Style/Pattern.  Good luck nailing down the origins.   Obadiah Barlow of Sheffield, England, around 1670 seems to be widely regarded as its origins.  Luke Furnace of Stannington is another name that'll pop up in most searches.  The John Russell Company is an American company that is likely responsible for mass producing this terrific pattern en mass in the US.     

Rambo knife.   * I am no longer sure this makes the cut ( no pun intended ).

Khukuri.  *  Whatever the inspiration, whatever the origins, this knife is emblematic of the Gurkhas and Nepalese culture.  Any blade that is so highly revered has got to make this list.       

Puukko.  * While all Puukko are knives, not all knives are Puukkos.  I really like this.  I see this phrasing pop up often. There is a description of what a Puukko traditionally is however I would defer to our Finnish members on that.  I will say there is a Puukko for almost every task, woodwork, hunting, fishing, chopping, vegetables. and more.

Spyderco  * Not model specific.   This Brand has done what all great brand have, become known for its style and features.  The hole in the blade, the blade shape, pocket clip, Spyder logo, all have come to be known as a Spyderco knife.  They have a wide range of knives from pocket knives to fixed blades.  They work with a wide range of knife makers and in house designers.  They are made in many places around the world.  The features of this brand are what are easily recognizable.

Esse Quam Videri
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,730

Nix us

******** * *
Re: Lets talk iconic knives.
« Reply #179 on: January 15, 2019, 06:27:38 PM »
We leaving kitchen knives off the list?

What about the fisherman's "fillet knife"?


 

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