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February Fixie Challenge 13689

Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,578
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #810 on: February 11, 2019, 02:18:46 PM »
 :iagree:
My favorite special treat tea is the Bigelow spiced chai tea!  :tu:
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,578
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #811 on: February 11, 2019, 02:20:26 PM »
Day 11 photo
No Life Club Posts: 1,180
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #812 on: February 11, 2019, 02:52:50 PM »
Day 11:
Time for a tea
Nice!  :like: :tu:
Thanks
:iagree:
My favorite special treat tea is the Bigelow spiced chai tea!  :tu:
Is that the brand (Bigelow)?
I especially like a chai towards winter but getting a bit tired of ordinary black tea at present.
Day 11 photo

Love that knife Ray :cheers:

Andrew
No Life Club Posts: 2,399
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #813 on: February 11, 2019, 02:54:06 PM »
Nice pic RR.  :like:
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,578
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #814 on: February 11, 2019, 04:08:57 PM »
Day 11:
Time for a tea
Nice!  :like: :tu:
Thanks
:iagree:
My favorite special treat tea is the Bigelow spiced chai tea!  :tu:
Is that the brand (Bigelow)?
I especially like a chai towards winter but getting a bit tired of ordinary black tea at present.
Day 11 photo

Love that knife Ray :cheers:
Yes Bigelow is the brand. Winter is my favorite time for this one also. Green tea and Earl Grey are my usual...mostly green.
Thanks I am liking it more and more every day. Perfect size and sits just right on the belt.  :tu:
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,578
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #815 on: February 11, 2019, 04:09:42 PM »
No Life Club Posts: 1,240
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #816 on: February 11, 2019, 05:51:07 PM »
Day 11



No Life Club Posts: 2,399
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #817 on: February 11, 2019, 07:53:46 PM »
Day 11
No power tonight (planned outage), so here’s just a shot in lamp light. Kinda suits the knife... :)
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,897

Nix us

******** * *
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #818 on: February 11, 2019, 08:22:40 PM »
Very cool shot, Max.
 :like:
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,897

Nix us

******** * *
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #819 on: February 11, 2019, 08:23:20 PM »
Day 11

(Image removed from quote.)


Looking good, Borg. Have you done anything to your handle yet?

Nice looking wood, there.
Hero Member Posts: 745
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #820 on: February 11, 2019, 08:33:11 PM »
Day #11 - opened a bag of cookies.


Sent from my Redmi Note 5

No Life Club Posts: 2,515
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #821 on: February 11, 2019, 08:45:02 PM »
Day 13:

Opened a package with a new knifeblade.
Cut the tag off a new toy for the dog.
Cut a couple of worn out AC belts at work.

Nice pics today gents :hatsoff:

Sent fra min FRD-L09 via Tapatalk

Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,320
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #822 on: February 11, 2019, 09:27:12 PM »
day 11: only shelf queen in my possession - that Harley zippo

 2019-02-11_09-13-13

Solving problems you didn't know you had in the most obscure way possible

"And now, it's time to hand this over to our tame race axe driver. Some say, he can live in the forest for six months at a time without food, and he knows of a secret tribe of only women where he is their God. All we know is, he's call the Styx!" - TazzieRob
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,897

Nix us

******** * *
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #823 on: February 11, 2019, 10:31:44 PM »
 :like:
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,897

Nix us

******** * *
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #824 on: February 11, 2019, 10:37:02 PM »
Day 11:

The ulu got used to open a new package of light bulbs.  Had to replace the bulbs in the range hood over the stove; it was no fun trying to make breakfast on a dark stove!




I was warned not to touch the bulbs with my fingers, so the ulu was instrumental in getting a clean opening here.
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,599
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #825 on: February 12, 2019, 12:29:01 AM »
That is a trick trying not to touch them if you don't have gloves.  My front porch light used those bulbs. :facepalm:

Barry
Global Moderator He Who Has The Most Nuts, Wins! Posts: 54,128
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #826 on: February 12, 2019, 02:18:25 AM »
Epic challenge guys :o :dd: :like:

I have read this thread off and on all day today to catch up because I had to catch up all the way from February the 3rd :ahhh

Lots of awesome uses, lots of great pics, love all the fixed blades that have been used (styles, handles, different types of blades and metals)  :cheers:

Even really liked the leather sheath tutorial,  Nix ;) :D

Almost halfway and you guys have done some great work in the thread :salute:
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,578
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,578
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #828 on: February 12, 2019, 03:05:41 AM »
Day 11
No power tonight (planned outage), so here’s just a shot in lamp light. Kinda suits the knife... :)
Nice photo by light only!  :like: :tu:
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,578
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #829 on: February 12, 2019, 03:07:19 AM »
Day #11 - opened a bag of cookies.
(Image removed from quote.)

Sent from my Redmi Note 5
Have one for me!  :tu:
I do miss my sweets...especially ice cream
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,578
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #830 on: February 12, 2019, 03:08:46 AM »
Day 13:

Opened a package with a new knifeblade.
Cut the tag off a new toy for the dog.
Cut a couple of worn out AC belts at work.

Nice pics today gents :hatsoff:(Image removed from quote.)(Image removed from quote.)(Image removed from quote.)

Sent fra min FRD-L09 via Tapatalk
Someone has had a busy day!  :like: :tu:
Great usages!
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,578
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #831 on: February 12, 2019, 03:09:27 AM »
day 11: only shelf queen in my possession - that Harley zippo

 2019-02-11_09-13-13
Nice  :tu:
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,578
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #832 on: February 12, 2019, 03:10:34 AM »
Day 11:

The ulu got used to open a new package of light bulbs.  Had to replace the bulbs in the range hood over the stove; it was no fun trying to make breakfast on a dark stove!

(Image removed from quote.)


I was warned not to touch the bulbs with my fingers, so the ulu was instrumental in getting a clean opening here.
I would say mission accomplished on that task!  :tu:
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,578
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #833 on: February 12, 2019, 03:12:16 AM »
Great posts and photo’s!  :cheers:
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,578
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #834 on: February 12, 2019, 03:30:24 AM »
A little late night snack
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,897

Nix us

******** * *
Nix's in-challenge sheath tutorial
« Reply #835 on: February 12, 2019, 04:32:57 AM »
Nix's Sheath Tutorial -- Part Four

Prepping the sheath for sewing.

In the last part we got the requisite pieces for the sheath cut out of our stock piece of leather. So far, so good. But before we get to stitching it all together, prudence calls for a bit of prep-work. A little preparation now, will make things tidier and nicer later.

The first thing we’ll stitch up with be the belt loop. You can't stitch in the belt loop once the main body of the sheath is closed up.  :facepalm:  And once the belt loop is stitched in, it is very hard to work on.
 
So, before it gets stitched down, let’s clean it up a bit and stain it.

If you look closely, I did a slightly sloppy job cutting out the loop and the arched tip (I did that on purpose for this tutorial….  :whistle:).




To smooth that out, I used a sanding block. Sandpaper (or a sanding block) is a great tool for shaping leather. In addition to smoothing out the curved contour of the belt loop, I used the sanding block to bevel the rough side edges of the belt loop. 




Next I used a chamfering tool to round the corners of the smooth side of the belt loop. Since the smooth side will be folded over, you won’t really see it, but, having the corners knocked off will make slipping the sheath on and off a little bit easier. So why not? 

My tool dug into the smooth leather a bit. I didn’t like that. I probably should have used a craft knife to do this job, but the chamfering tool was handy.




The other tool in the picture above is a fancy burnishing tool. This is a good time to talk about burnishing:

A cut piece of leather has one smooth side (the top grain) and 3 rough sides, the back and two edges. These rough sides can be smoothed out, especially the edges, with a bit of brisk rubbing. The edges can be dampened, usually with water, and then rubbed with a hard object or tool. A burnishing tool is most commonly made of wood or bone. I like these wooden ones because of the grooves that can pinch down the edges. However, a simple dowel or smooth stick could work equally well.

By rubbing the damp edges with a bit of vigor, the fibers mat down and smooth out. This increased the durability and weather resistance of the edges of the leather. So, not only does it look more professinal, but it is also functional.

Again, once the belt loop is stitched down, we won’t be able to burnish it, so now is the time.

In this close up, you can see how the edge is smoothed out and become a bit glossy. The leather has been moistened with water, but nothing else.




We’ll do some more with the bel loop later, but for now it is in pretty good shape. We’ve smoothed it, rounded the edges, and burnished the edges.

Now, let’s get those welt pieces glued in and trimmed up.

To prepare the welt pieces we need to skive the ends. ‘Skiving’ is the process of  tapering a piece of leather to provide a transition from a thick area to a thin area.  One end of our welt will be thinned down.

We’re are going to use two welt pieces. If we didn’t taper them down, there would be gaps in the edges of the sheath. Not a problem, really, but gaps could be an area where water could get it. And gaps don’t look very professional. So, it’s worth doing, and only takes a moment.

Here, I’ve used the ulu to thin the primary welt as it approaches the fold in the sheath. The blade will be thin here and we don’t need a thick welt. Plus, a thin well will make it easier to fold the sheath over.




I do the same thing with the secondary welt to provide a transition for the ‘two welt’ section  to the ‘single welt’ section. Here are the skived welts in place:




Now one last preparation step. This is optional, but seems to help. I’m going to cut a couple of grooves on the inside of the sheath to help it fold around the knife more easily. This is a small detail, but seems to pay off.

I’ve marked my groove lines next to the center line of the sheath. I’ve angled them inward slightly.




In this case, I’ve used a grooving tool to cut these grooves, but I’ve used a craft knife to do this in the past. Just be careful!




You can see that my grooves (spaced about a handle-width apart) fall inside the welt line. My welt won’t be binding up the fold. This is a good thing.

Things are looking pretty good at this point. Not perfect, but good enough.

The belt loop has been prepared. The welts have been shaped to flow smoothly from thick to thin. Everything is lining up nicely. We have some folding grooves cut into the inside to make folding easier.

I think we can glue in the welts now.

Again, I’m using contact cement to glue my welts in. This isn’t necessary, but sure makes things easier.




With this stuff, apply glue to both sides of the material and then let dry for 15 minutes or so before sticking the pieces together.

Once the primary welt gets glued in, the secondary welt gets glued in place.






After the glue has had a chance to dry, we can start to think about dying issues.




Once the sheath is closed, it will be hard to dye the interior. We might as well apply some dye to the inside now. I only dye the top third….nobody will notice that the bottom is not dyed.

I’m using a water-based dye. It is easy to work with, but….it does run if it gets wet. Oiling the sheath later will help with that, but even so, some running under damp conditions can occur. Oil based dyes might be a better choice, but my local shoe repair shop carried this dye, so that’s what I use.




The same goes for the belt loop. Once it is stitched down, it will be difficult to dye, so we might as well dye that area now.




It would be quite reasonable to dye the whole sheath now, but I find I prefer to wait.

I know I’m going to trim the edges and dye them after the sheath is stitched up. And I find it easier to see the stitching marks on un-dyed leather. So, for those reasons, I’ll wait to finish dying the sheath until the final stages.

But, now that the belt loop has been dyed, I burnished it a bit more. It won’t look much better than this once it’s done, so you better be satisfied with it now.




I think it’s OK. Oiling and sealing it will give it a slightly more finished look, but, as it is, it’s OK for me.

Now, before we finish up for the day, let’s do a couple of extra things.

One, we’ll trim the excess material off. The welts were slightly oversized, we can trim those off now. This is important to do before we mark out stitching lines.




And lastly, I’ve damped the leather. This is called ‘casing’. Leather is dampened and left to rest so that the fibers become evenly moist. You want damp, not wet or soggy. Just sponging with a little water is all that is needed.

Moistening the leather softens the fibers and allows them to bend and flex. It also makes tooling a bit easier. Since we are going to fold the sheath in half tomorrow, casing and resting the leather overnight will be helpful.

I really moistened the belt loop and folded that over, more or less into position. That will be ready to sew in place tomorrow.

The cased leather gets stored in a plastic bag to keep it from drying out (which would defeat the purpose, after all.).




Thanks for staying with me (if you read this far). We did a lot of small things today, none of which were very interesting. However, these little details will make a difference tomorrow.

So far, we designed our sheath and made a template. We used the template to cut out the necessary pieces for the sheath. And we’ve gotten these pieces prep’ed for assembly.

Tomorrow, we’ll actually sew up the sheath and start finishing it.
No Life Club Posts: 3,164
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #836 on: February 12, 2019, 04:52:34 AM »
WOW Fella's!  :cheers:
This has been a very ethralling 1/2 days read.  Loads of great blades, videos, iformation and  :hatsoff: to my favorite amature buffoon Nix for an awesome tutorial in progress.  This almost makes having been sick for the last three days worth it.  I'll be keeping a closer eye on this challenge as it continues.  :popcorn: :popcorn:

HELP, some how my sheath doesn't seem to fit right.

"LOGIC!  My God, the man's talking about logic!  We're talking about Universal Armageddon!"
Dr.  McCoy
Global Moderator He Who Has The Most Nuts, Wins! Posts: 54,128
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #837 on: February 12, 2019, 04:56:50 AM »
Another very informative chapter :like: Once it is all done perhaps make a separate thread (copy and paste it) for this great walk through :salute: :like: Be a great addition to the sheaths and bags Forum :cheers:
No Life Club Posts: 3,164
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #838 on: February 12, 2019, 04:59:44 AM »
 :iagree:

"LOGIC!  My God, the man's talking about logic!  We're talking about Universal Armageddon!"
Dr.  McCoy
Jr. Member Posts: 95
Re: February Fixie Challenge
« Reply #839 on: February 12, 2019, 05:35:11 AM »
Day 11

Out in the shop and I gathered some cardboard trash to cut up. Up to now, I have only used my knife for minimal cutting tasks. I want a good challenge that will really let me see how this knife handles tough cutting jobs.
 
Here is the pile to test the knife.




The edge was still sharp and easily cut through the cardboard. I did not time the entire process but it was a little slow because my hand started to get some hot spots. The edges of the handle were digging into my hand as I applied a tight grip and started to cut. But it did the job.



At the end of this challenge, I was going to give an overall review of the knife but today's challenge already told me all I need to know. This is a great little knife that handles small tasks easily. However, if I HAD to have only one knife on me, this would not be it. It makes a great addition or supplemental blade.

Ken


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

 

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