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Roxon MBT3 S601 Multi-tool Review 497

Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,809 Born to multitask.
Roxon MBT3 S601 Multi-tool Review
« on: March 02, 2019, 05:00:28 AM »
The world of specialized multi-tools is as bizarre as it is obscure. Weight, shape, features, anything can depart from the norm, in order to accommodate specific needs.
Another offering from Roxon, the MTB3 is a multi-functional behemoth. Let's see what it's all about.



Dimensions and other info
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Length: 11.1" (28.2cm)
Width (body): 1.5" (39mm)
Width (spatula): 2.7" (69mm) at the widest part
Thickness: 0.47" (20mm) or 0.71" (30mm) if we count the spatula

Tool weight: 18.66oz (529g)
Tool and sheath: 20.88oz (592gr)

Materials: SS430, 2cr13, 3cr13, Aluminium alloy, polypropylene, polycarbafil

Handle fasteners: Torx 8, Torx 6

Price at time of review: 30$
Warranty: 10 Years

Reviews of the other tools in the series:
Roxon KS S501
Roxon Storm S801

Roxon is an own branding team under Chamfun Industrial Co. Ltd.


Implements
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Bottle opener
Torx 8 Chicago screw
Double-hooked

Corkscrew
Assisted by bottle-opener
Pinned

Knife
Closed length: 6.93" (17.6cm)
Opened length: 12" (30.5cm)
Blade length: 5.12" (13cm)
Cutting edge: 4.8" (12.2cm)

Weight: 7.5oz (213gr)
Blade material: SS430 (48-52HRC)

Two-handed operation; nail-nick
Drop-point spear-point
Plain edge, hollow-grind
Locking; lock-back
Locked both in closed and opened position.
Teflon washers

Spatula
Length closed: 10.47" (26.6cm)
Length opened: 14.41" (36.6cm)
Head length: 3.937" (10cm)
Liner-lock
Material: SS430
Weight: 5.96oz (169gr)
Teflon washers

Fork
Material: SS430
Length closed: 9.41" (23.9cm)
Length opened: 14.41" (36.6cm)
Tine length: 1.38" (3.5cm)
Liner-lock
Material: SS430
Weight: 5.18oz (147gr)
Teflon washers

Tongs
Combination of spatula and fork
Spring-loaded
Back-lock



The tool comes in a thick cardboard box. Included are the tool, a nylon sheath and a brief instruction manual.


The sheath is single stitched, with re-enforced backing, velcro closure, and a long belt-loop. The tool fits inside very well, with no fear of coming out, thanks to its weight, length, and decent velcro. Arguably, the sheath's primary function is storage, rather than carrying ability.


Riding on the spine of the tool are the bottle opener and corkscrew. These can be used in any configuration of the tool. Having the components assembled into one, the tool will be heavier and a little wider. For prolonged use of the small implements, it would be better to detach the additional tools, to reduce the weight and therefore fatigue.


The bottle opener is formed properly, and removed the cap in a single, natural motion. Similar in design to a bottle-opener of a common waiter's tool, there are two teeth that hook under the cap's rim, and two leverage arms, making the removal of caps quick and easy.
It pivots in and out smoothly, has no play, and the retention when closed is excellent. It is attached with a Torx 8 Chicago screw, so it can be tightened should it get loose. Of course, it also functions as the corkscrew assist.


The corkscrew can pivot all the way back at about 160°, taking full advantage of the assist. It is thicker than a traditional Swiss Army Knife corkscrew, and with an assist and a long handle to pull against, it will undoubtedly remove corks.
When retracted, it does not interfere with grip, when using the blade. It sits flat against a wide handle, and it is polished and rounded, enough to disappear in my hand when cutting.

Retention when deployed and retracted is excellent, although it can be manipulated to slightly flex left and right, but not back and forth.


On the back of the tool, we find the main locking button. Pressing it allows the spatula and fork to be detached. This back lock also locks the blade in the closed position. Pressing the button does not release the tools in a loose, uncontrolled manner. There is no danger of the tools dropping. The spatula and fork have to slide out of place. Due to their shape and how the tuck into place, it is easier to remove the spatula first. While keeping the button pressed and removing the spatula, the fork still sat into place. It did not pop out, or slide out on its own. Disassembling the tool in its individual parts is a very safe and controlled affair.
To reattach the fork and spatula onto the knife, all three must be folded. The fork and spatula have pins that insert into the slots of the main handle, where the back-lock secures them.


With the other tools detached, we have the blade. When retracted, the blade is locked. Pressing the button releases it. There is a nail-nick, but it can also be pinched and opened, utilizing the nick for traction.
The blade is nice and long, and the back-lock engages solidly. There is no play whatsoever.
The grip is somewhat comfortable, although the front edges are not terribly rounded, and will dig into my palm if I squeeze hard enough.

The edge was sharpened properly out of the box, ready to take on edibles, which is the targeted purpose. It may be a little awkward for some to use such a large knife for vegetables, but it will cut wonderfully. Thanks to its impressive length, and sharp edge, it will fair much better against meat.

The blade can only be opened when the spatula and fork are detached. Understandable, considering the intended function as part of a barbecue tool set.


The spatula and fork can be used folded, and indeed, one could be used while still attached to the knife. Still, it would be better to remove both, and eliminate the weight of the knife.

There is no retention mechanism when these are folded, as they were not designed to be used in such a manner. When unfolded, they offer far better reach, they are easier to clean, and of course they lock. You could use them folded, but performance is optimal when unfolded.

The handles are very comfortable to hold. The liner-locks engage securely with no play, and the necks of the tools are ribbed, for additional strength.

The spatula is perforated. The holes and slits allow excess oil to drain away, while also providing some traction. The head is long and wide, and at a perfect angle to slide comfortably under food.

The fork's tines are serrated, and it matches the width of the spatula, providing excellent grip on food. It easily pierced into steak, but is arguably more useful as the other half of the tongs.


To assemble the two into tongs, simply unfold them both, and insert the pins of the fork into the slots of the spatula. The spatula will click into place, and the tongs are ready to operate.
The spring tension is about the same on my dedicated tongs. Strong enough to push the tongs open, but not strong enough to build my biceps.
Very easy to use, nice and solid. The locks hold everything in place, and the tongs hold food securely. Note that they are barbecue tongs, designed to securely transport and flip burgers, steaks, and other single, solid pieces of food.

To disassemble the tongs, press the black back-lock, and slide the fork apart from the spatula.



Construction
The tool is held together with Torx 8 and Torx 6 screws (post and screw, or Chicago screws).
The blade, fork and spatula are made of SS430 and use teflon washers.
The blade is a hollow-grind and locks with a back-lock, both in the opened and closed position.
The fork and spatula lock with liner-locks when unfolded. When attached to the main handle, they are secured with the same back-lock as the blade.
Their necks are ribbed, to increase load-bearing ability.
The tongs are secured by a separate back-lock made of polypropylene.
The handles are made of aluminium alloy, and carbon-fiber. Liners and the rest are 2cr13 and 3cr13.
The corkscrew is pinned and slip-joint.

Construction Quality
The implements pivot in and out smoothly. All locks engage securely with an audible snap, with no play. The blade is rock-solid, thanks to its great lock-back. The spatula and fork merge into tongs very convincingly, solidly, with a great spring return, and very comfortable handles and action.
The heads are on par with dedicated grilling forks and spatulas, crisp, smooth, and precise. The handles are wonderfully finished, and the screws are brand new, nice and tight.

Typical of the series, the S601 is a well made, quality tool. No scratches, no sharp points or unfinished edges. All liners and handle scales are machined properly, rounded off, and polished. It assembles nicely, while making efficient use of space.
For what it was designed for, it is arguably over-built, with locks far stronger than you would need for carving chickens and flipping burgers.

The biggest issue would arguably be the lack of retention when the fork and spatula are folded. Aside from tightening their pivoting screws, there is nothing to keep them folded. There is no issue when unfolded, as their liner-locks are solid, and when attached to the knife, they cannot unfold, although they have enough room to rattle. The fork will just wobble, and is not that bad when its pivot screw is tightened. The spatula has more clearance, and the screw can only be tightened to a certain point. Shaking the tool, the spatula may move a little, left and right, and the outer tines of the fork may slightly mar the finish of the spatula.

Also the corkscrew could flex a little left and right, but it will still function fully.

Lastly, while I have no doubts on its durability, I cannot help but wonder how long the teflon washers will last. Considering the intended proximity to fire, coals, grills, pans, and boiling oils, it would be nice not to have to worry about washers overheating and possibly deforming over time.



Design
The tool is surprisingly compact, given the modular design and length of implements. Space was used efficiently, while still providing a very functional set of tools. The anodized aluminium contrasts nicely with the black polycarbafil scales. The handles are clean, with only the sculpted Roxon logo in white paint, contrasting nicely with the black handle. The handles curve softly at the ends and straight lines are unbroken. Of course, the spatula and fork stick out of one end, their crisp form demanding attention. An interesting design indeed.



Performance
Despite the apparent complexity of assembly, the tool is very easy to use. One main button releases the side implements, and then the blade. The tongs are a joy to use, with very comfortable handles, a great spring return, and effective ends.
The spatula and fork have nothing to envy from dedicated tools. Their liner-locks hold them firm, and their ribbed design provides durability. The blade is great. Nice and long, with a solid lock, and a proper edge. Taking into consideration the purpose of the tool, it performed excellently.

Conclusion
The MBT3 is a very interesting and thought out design. Everything performs as it should, while still looking elegant. Of course, with a specialized design, there are some additional things that need to be acknowledged.

While the weight is definitely there, it is arguably negligible. This is designed to be a barbecue tool, not for every day carry. It is long, heavy, and awkwardly shaped for edc. It would be like edc'ing a skyscraper.
On the other hand, for a tool that will live in the kitchen or at the side of a barbecue, it is great. The weight and bulk become irrelevant. Performance takes priority, and it will perform admirably in its intended role. Everything on it is a proper tool, quite comfortable and effective. It will also be easy to clean, and it will not take up much space when not being used. Should the occasion arise, the tool is undeniably convenient to pack for a recreational trip. The features are specific to a task, and a comparison with common multi-tools would be meaningless and unfair.

Looking at it for what it is, it will certainly function for what it was designed to do, while also being an undeniable curiosity, a peculiar, modular leviathan, an interesting conversation piece and a welcomed entry to any multi-tool collection. Thanks to its great cardboard box, it would make an excellent gift to collectors, or barbecue enthusiasts. Also, there is the fidget factor. It is a great deal of fun to attach and detach the parts, assemble and disassemble the tongs, or just unfold one of the longest multi-tool blades ever made.

Some minor issues could be addressed, like the retention of the fork and spatula when folded, and the corkscrew's pinning, but even then, those are outweighed by the tool's performance, elegance, and purposeful novelty. The value is definitely there.



Pros
-Excellent meeting of design and function
-Built like a tank
-Inexpensive

Cons
-Fork and spatula have no retention mechanism when folded
-Corkscrew can flex
« Last Edit: March 02, 2019, 05:25:16 AM by ReamerPunch »

Zombie Apprentice Posts: 10,337 Man of Multiple MultiTool Manufacturers
Re: Roxon MBT3 S601 Multi-Tool Review
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2019, 05:17:42 AM »
Another great review, RP! Very well done. Thank you! :cheers:

May need to pick one of these up too.  :ahhh

Pontificating particularly pious positions pertaining to polymorphic paraphernalia. G-Man.
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,809 Born to multitask.
Re: Roxon MBT3 S601 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2019, 10:47:02 AM »
Thanks! :cheers:
I think it compliments the series and collection nicely.  :D
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 10,337 Man of Multiple MultiTool Manufacturers
Re: Roxon MBT3 S601 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2019, 02:43:23 PM »
Thanks! :cheers:
I think it compliments the series and collection nicely.  :D
:iagree:
Roxon appears to be the best C&C company at the moment. I'd rank them slightly above Ganzo too, because of Roxon's variety and unique style. :)

Pontificating particularly pious positions pertaining to polymorphic paraphernalia. G-Man.
He Who Has The Most Nuts, Wins! Posts: 55,057
Re: Roxon MBT3 S601 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2019, 03:32:01 PM »
Excellent review RP  :cheers: :like:

fail to prepare prepare to fail
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,809 Born to multitask.

 

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