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Trade Forums => EDC Swap Shop => Topic started by: enki_ck on December 15, 2011, 10:42:05 PM

Title: Guide for the international trader
Post by: enki_ck on December 15, 2011, 10:42:05 PM
Due to this being an international forum and packages changing hands often, not only Christmas, I thought it would be nice to have a reference thread for people to familiarize themselves on the international customs regulations. Not only for our Christmas gifts but the trade that go on here throughout the year.

So post your countries regulation or correct if anything I wrote was wrong (I used info I could find on the forums on this subject and some of it may have changed).
 
Croatia:
You pay customs if an Item is marked at $50 or more including postage if it’s a gift. If you bought something it’s $27. You have to pay 12-25% (depending in the item) customs fees on the item + shipping and an extra 23% VAT + $4 for the postman to bring them the money back. So the formula is: (item+shipping)x1.12)x1.23+$4. And sometimes if you're unlucky and your item arrives during holidays they charge you for storage.
 
Norway:
Everything above $33 for a purchased item(including the shipping cost), you have to pay 25% VAT, sometimes Custom depending on the products and on top of this; $12 and up to $18 in fee just to have the paperwork done. If the stuff is from a friend and is a gift then the limit is 170$. The customs fee is 20$
 
Finland:
If the value of the package is less than 45 Euros or so ($58), it's free of customs. If it's worth more than that, the VAT is 22% (soon it will be 23%) for most things, it's less for some stuff, e.g. books. And then there's a variable tax, which depends on what you have bought, generally 3-10%.
 

Serbia:
You pay customs fees and VAT on everything above 50 Euro ($65) including postage if you bought something from a store or 75 Euro (98$) if a private person sends you something as a gift.

Portugal:

Packages up to 45€ ($58) are free from custom duties, however there is NO VAT exemption in any case.

The final formula will be: X * VAT + re-expedition cost, where X is (PACKAGE VALUE + PACKAGE PORTS + PACKAGE INSURANCE) * CUSTOM DUTY PERCENTAGE + SOME LEGAL STUFF THAT GIVES AROUND 3 to 4 EUR. Receiving ANYTHING from any non-EU country by mail always have the risk of getting caught by customs, no matter its value.

 
Canada:
If the value of the item is below $100, it’s free of customs fees.


United Kingdom:


Customs Duty is payable if the value of the gift exceeds £135, but will be waived if the amount of duty is £9 or under. Import VAT is payable if the value of the gift exceeds £40 ($62).(Mods, please remove if against the rules or if posted in the wrong section) I posted it here cause it seemed fit, and it could be a nice sticky) :D
Title: Guide for the international trader
Post by: Medic82 on December 15, 2011, 11:03:01 PM
The 30$ limit in Norway, well 33$ at the moment, is for goods that you have purchased. If the stuff is from a friend and is a gift then the limit is 170$. The customs fee is 20$


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: user24 on December 15, 2011, 11:06:27 PM
it could be a nice sticky) :D
:tu: nice work
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: enki_ck on December 15, 2011, 11:15:05 PM
:tu: nice work

It was badwolf's idea, I just did the leg/mouse work. :D

The 30$ limit in Norway, well 33$ at the moment, is for goods that you have purchased. If the stuff is from a friend and is a gift then the limit is 170$. The customs fee is 20$


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Thanks, edited. :tu:
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: Carlos on December 16, 2011, 12:03:02 AM
Portugal status for online trade, particular to particular, without commercial purpose:

* packages from EU members are NOT subject to customs;
* everything else, no matter what value, gift status, or whatever, is subject to customs.

The customs apply mainly 2 kinds of costs:
- custom duties: a % defined by EU specific to each kind of product;
- VAT, that's 23% for the general case.

Packages up to 45€ are free from custom duties, however there is NO VAT exemption in any case (contrary to some urban myths running around).

The final formula will be: X * VAT + re-expedition cost, where X is (PACKAGE VALUE + PACKAGE PORTS + PACKAGE INSURANCE) * CUSTOM DUTY PERCENTAGE + SOME LEGAL JUNK THAT GIVES AROUND 3 to 4 EUR

Some notes:
* marking the package as gift or anything else is useless: customs don't care;
* declaring a small value, "covering" it with more postage cost is useless: custom's sum all price items they can get before apply taxes;
* to find the package value, customs may open it to search for billing information;
* if there is no indication of package value, they ask the destination end to send them the value;
* if even so they think that value is incorrect, they can arbitrate the value they think the package is worth.
* they always use the better to them conversion, for example, if I get a 55 USD package, they use 55 EUROS for the value (they should use about 42), but if I get a 55 GBP they make the conversion to 65 EUROS;
- if they note some pattern, i.e. if they note that I'm receiving international packages too frequently, they can retain them all together and charge them as one.

Having said that, receiving ANYTHING from any non-EU country by mail always have the risk of getting caught by customs, no matter its value.

I have empirically found that if the package is small (in size), has a small declared value and was sent with regular mail (non priority stuff), it tends to pass free, though.
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: enki_ck on December 16, 2011, 12:24:20 AM
Thanks Carlos for the info and I feel your pain. They sometimes do the arbitrary value here too. And I got warned from them that they would declare me an importer of goods if I continue to receive so many packages from abroad. (If I get more than 6 a month, they can charge me for every single one even if the value of it is $1)  ???


I'm cross threading this on EDCF to gather as much data as possible.
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: enki_ck on December 16, 2011, 01:24:28 AM
Just heard back from Vladimir. The laws in Serbia changed recently so it's now a bit better :D I edited the first post with new data.
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: edcgear on December 16, 2011, 07:02:29 AM
Thanks Enki!!

Hvala!
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: rayraychil on December 16, 2011, 12:12:39 PM
Great Job there buddy this will be very useful for future trades/swaps and of course xmas pools ! 8)
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: nuphoria on December 16, 2011, 01:01:49 PM
The UK duties depend on where the package is coming from - I think your post shows the EU charges?

The limits are a lot lower if you are receiving from the US etc... I think it's $30 for a purchase and $40 for a gift roughly. Then we also get stung for an extra £8 from the PO (or whatever they are currently trying to justify as "handling fees").
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: cerbera147 on December 16, 2011, 05:27:42 PM
The UK duties depend on where the package is coming from - I think your post shows the EU charges?

The limits are a lot lower if you are receiving from the US etc... I think it's $30 for a purchase and $40 for a gift roughly. Then we also get stung for an extra £8 from the PO (or whatever they are currently trying to justify as "handling fees").

Definitely not £135; wish it was  :-\

I ordered goods from Saddleback totalling $82 / £53 not including shipping. Got stung for £18  :rant:

Great thread  :tu:
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: enki_ck on December 16, 2011, 06:42:12 PM
The UK duties depend on where the package is coming from - I think your post shows the EU charges?

The limits are a lot lower if you are receiving from the US etc... I think it's $30 for a purchase and $40 for a gift roughly. Then we also get stung for an extra £8 from the PO (or whatever they are currently trying to justify as "handling fees").

I was going by this:
http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/customs/post/buying.htm#3 (http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/customs/post/buying.htm#3)

Specificity 
Quote
All other goods
If you order or send purchased goods other than alcohol, tobacco, perfume and toilet water from a country outside the EU then you:
 
  • don't have to pay Excise Duty
  • may have to pay Customs Duty on goods with a value that exceeds £135
  • will have to pay Import VAT on goods with a value that exceeds £15
Note that on all goods from outside the EU, Customs Duty is waived if the amount of duty calculated is £9 or under.

But as I'm not in the UK I don't know all the little regulations that only the ones that have experienced it know. :D


That's why I started this thread. To get educated. ;)
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: enki_ck on December 17, 2011, 09:28:25 PM
New info

Finland:

 If the value of the package is less than 45 Euros or so ($58), it's free of customs. If it's worth more than that, the VAT is 23%  for most things, it's less for some stuff, e.g. books. And then there's a variable tax, which depends on what you have bought, generally 3-10%.
 If the VAT or the import tax is less than 10 Euros, they won't collect it. So 10/0,23 = 43,47€ or less and you won't have to pay the VAT. Same with the other taxes, but they are more variable so there's no exact amount. Postage is included in the value for the VAT, but not for the import tax. And curiously, the below 10 Euros rule is applied separately to both, so often you have to pay the VAT but not the import tax.
 
 The VAT for books is 8% or 9% I think, and for foodstuffs it's something like 13% IIRC. But for "things" it's 23%.

Germany:
 All packages from outside of the EU are free of VAT and customs fees to up to 22€ (Shipping expenses included). The packages from outside the EU are free of customs fees till up to 150€, but you have to pay the german VAT - 19%. For packages above the 150€ limit you have to pay the customs fees and VAT. Customs fees differ depending on the content, but it's roughly a third of the value of the package. The Gift label on the package is irrelevant, cause the customs officers know it often isn't true. There is a rule though that you can get gifts up to 45€.
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: Carlos on December 17, 2011, 10:50:28 PM
I've seen a lot of "familiar" figures on UE member countries, which I believe are not just coincidence. The international trade on UE countries is defined by UE directives. As such they should be common to all UE members.

There are two different "costs" to observe: the custom duties and the import VAT. The custom duties is common to all UE and it's revenue is income to the UE and not to the country itself (that is my understanding), while the VAT application is subject to each country and it's revenue is to the country.

The common directives say:
- particular to particular packages may be exempt* of custom duties up to 45€
- business to particular packages may be exempt* of custom duties up to 150€
(note how these two numbers have appeared before for other UE countries)

* "may be exempt" means as defined by the CEE regulation 1186/2009


As for VAT, which is the biggest burden after all, my guess is that each state can define its own limits. The portuguese case defines a 22€ limit which benefits from VAT exemption, BUT this limit is not applicable to mail orders, which includes electronic commerce. Because of this, AND because small value packages usually are not processed by customs, many people wrongly believes that packages up to 22€ are exempt from VAT.

This is an official resume the portuguese authorities have "prepared": http://www.dgaiec.min-financas.pt/pt/informacao_aduaneira/encomendas_contrafaccao/ (http://www.dgaiec.min-financas.pt/pt/informacao_aduaneira/encomendas_contrafaccao/)
It cuts most of legal blah blah and points to the concrete laws.
Note that while the custom duties regulations points to CEE/UE documents, VAT stuff points to local laws.


Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: AHB on December 17, 2011, 11:05:02 PM
Denmark
The limit is $16 for purchased goods. Everything above is hit with 12% custom + 25% VAT + $30 "handling" fee..  >:( :P :P
The limit for gifts is around $60.  :)
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: enki_ck on December 21, 2011, 10:07:00 PM
Hungary:

 No charges if the total value (= goods + shipping costs!) does not exceed 22 Euros.
 VAT payable for packages totalling in between 22-100 Euros.
 VAT + 10% customs payable beyond that.

VAT is changing from 25% to 27% as of 01/01
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: Suveges on March 09, 2012, 02:59:09 AM
Weird, why would Hungary list it in Euros, I thought they were still on Forints?
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: enki_ck on March 11, 2012, 06:00:50 PM
Weird, why would Hungary list it in Euros, I thought they were still on Forints?

Szia, Süveges! Hogy van? :D

They don't. And neither does Denmark, Norway, Croatia, ... we use krone, kuna, ... and different currencies but it is aimed not for the residents of those countries, they know their custom laws (or at least they should). This is for the people who they trade with. And it's easier to list prices in Euros or dollars than to make them do conversions of currencies they never even heard of.
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: kronk on March 14, 2012, 02:41:00 AM
Anybody got the info for the US?
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: mvyrmnd on March 14, 2012, 04:37:15 AM
Australia:

Items up to the value of $900 are import duty (GST) exempt.

Organic items are heavily controlled (Wood/Leather etc). Alcohol and food are no worries.

Specifically to Knives and Multitools: Our laws are stupid. Any OHO knive is now a no-no. Multitools with a OHO blade is still a fuzzy area. Unless you've got cash to blow, don't risk it.

No Flippers or assisted opening blades.

(I'll update this with any other useful tips I find)
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: enki_ck on August 28, 2012, 08:06:15 PM
An update:

Canada - present norms: SOURCE (http://www.cbsa.gc.ca/import/postal-postale/duty-droits-eng.html)

 Under the provisions of the Postal Import Remission Order, if someone mails you an item worth CAN$20 or less, you don’t have to pay duty or taxes on the item (unless on the non-qualified list: alcool, tobacco, magazines...etc). If the item is worth more than CAN$20, you must pay the applicable duty, the GST or HST, and any PST (all taxes) applicable to your Province, on the item’s full value.
 Also, to process goods imported as mail that are subject to duty and/or tax, Canada Post charges the recipient CAN $8.50. If the item is duty-free and tax exempt, no amount is charged.
 
 Gifts are treated differently:
 
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: enki_ck on November 25, 2012, 08:48:01 PM

UK CUSTOMS HEADSUP:


I may be the last to know this, but the limit for merchandise imports from outside the EU is now £15, not £18 and it previously was. I have been caught out with this myself so wanted to share the info. Gifts are £40 though, so easier to get by ;)
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: rayraychil on November 27, 2012, 03:44:50 PM
Another handy idea is to get the sender to mark the items as used craft tool or used handtool & mark package Fragile Handle with Care Please ! I have found this works well also as well as saying it is a gift :drink: :salute:

Ray
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: enki_ck on February 14, 2013, 10:07:59 PM
Netherlands:
Taxes are 6% for books and cd's/dvd's/bluerays, and 21% for everything else.All commercial packages from outside of the EU with a declared value of 22 Euro's or higher are taxed (this is a combined price of the item and shipping costs, the shipping costs are always taxed too), packages marked as gifts are taxed if the value is over 45 euro's. On top of that there's a customs/handling fee of 12,50 euro's (or 17 euro's for EMS shipments only) for all packages that are taxed as well.


Sweden:
Gifts from a country OUTSIDE EU.
You don't have to pay customs and tax for a gift which is sent from a Person outside EU if:It´s a occasional delivery intended for you or your familys personal use.The delivery value doesn't exceed 400SEK or 60.91 USD.

Gifts from a Country INSIDE EU.
You don't have to pay any customs for a gift sent from a country inside EU.However there is specific provision for goods regarding Environment, Health and Security.
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: nuphoria on February 15, 2013, 12:53:02 PM
Not sure if I mentioned it around here but the limit on UK customs value dropped a little recently - a package marked $25 or under is ok :tu:
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: Buddy on July 24, 2013, 09:04:05 PM
Even though the header says this is over 120 days and maybe to re-think my post or post a new thread. I like this post and have had some experience with Australia shipping, so here is a link

http://www.customs.gov.au/site/page4369.asp

Great Idea.................... :tu:
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: enki_ck on July 24, 2013, 09:08:30 PM
Thanks for the bump. :cheers:

I've been thinking I should update this thread as there must have been some changes since the it was originally started but never find time to go digging again for all the info. :shrug:

Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: rmagralha on July 25, 2013, 05:23:37 PM
I'd like to explain about Brazil.

Any imported goods declared with more than 50 US$ are taxed in 60%, product cost+shipping. Those items can remain in customs for months depending on the country that is coming from.

Shipments transported by couriers (FEDEX, UPS, DHL) are always taxed in 100% doesn't matter the declared value.

Marking goods as "gift" does not guarantee that will pass through customs, they do a random analysis in the lot, so your item can be taxed if they feel that it should, The same apply for items that seems to worth more than 50US$ and was declared with less than that, as SAKs are small and do not call attention usually it pass through fine even if it was a couple of hundreds of dollars.

Just want to give you this overview so folks can understand why sometimes Brazilians ask to lower declaration values, taxes are huge here.... :-[ and the government does not justify these taxes with benefits for the people.

Really interesting thread enki! :tu:
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: bmot on July 25, 2013, 05:41:22 PM
I'd like to explain about Brazil.

Any imported goods declared with more than 50 US$ are taxed in 60%, product cost+shipping. Those items can remain in customs for months depending on the country that is coming from.

Shipments transported by couriers (FEDEX, UPS, DHL) are always taxed in 100% doesn't matter the declared value.

Marking goods as "gift" does not guarantee that will pass through customs, they do a random analysis in the lot, so your item can be taxed if they feel that it should, The same apply for items that seems to worth more than 50US$ and was declared with less than that, as SAKs are small and do not call attention usually it pass through fine even if it was a couple of hundreds of dollars.

Just want to give you this overview so folks can understand why sometimes Brazilians ask to lower declaration values, taxes are huge here.... :-[ and the government does not justify these taxes with benefits for the people.

Really interesting thread enki! :tu:


100%!!! :o :o :o :o :ahhh :ahhh :ahhh  Are they out of their minds!?!
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: rmagralha on July 25, 2013, 07:07:18 PM
I'd like to explain about Brazil.

Any imported goods declared with more than 50 US$ are taxed in 60%, product cost+shipping. Those items can remain in customs for months depending on the country that is coming from.

Shipments transported by couriers (FEDEX, UPS, DHL) are always taxed in 100% doesn't matter the declared value.

Marking goods as "gift" does not guarantee that will pass through customs, they do a random analysis in the lot, so your item can be taxed if they feel that it should, The same apply for items that seems to worth more than 50US$ and was declared with less than that, as SAKs are small and do not call attention usually it pass through fine even if it was a couple of hundreds of dollars.

Just want to give you this overview so folks can understand why sometimes Brazilians ask to lower declaration values, taxes are huge here.... :-[ and the government does not justify these taxes with benefits for the people.

Really interesting thread enki! :tu:


100%!!! :o :o :o :o :ahhh :ahhh :ahhh  Are they out of their minds!?!

I know...is ridiculous..... :'(
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: enki_ck on July 25, 2013, 11:05:23 PM
Thanks for the input, rmagralha. :cheers:

And I feel your pain.  :-\  I passed on on a lot of great deals I saw cause the customs fees would make it not a good deal anymore. (40% here but still :( ) At least I can now since the 1st of July import from the EU countries without fear of customs fees.


I've been wondering if I should sticky this thread. :think: Buddy suggested it to me per PM too. I have a link to it in my signature and with a dozen or two post a day I have it does get seen but maybe a permanent place at the top of the Swap Shop would be better. The weird thing is that a copy of this thread is actually stickied on EDCF (as it was created simultaneously on both forums as I gathered the info from members on both and updated the threads).
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: rmagralha on August 06, 2013, 01:59:17 AM
Go sticky, is really helpful! Pleasure to help.  :tu:
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: kkokkolis on January 07, 2014, 09:06:00 AM
For Greece it is really complicated. It seems that it relies heavily on customs' officer discrimination. But in general packs from EU either pass without charges or one pays the VAT difference (here it is 23%). From other countries you usually (but not always) pay nothing for a small pack declared under 99 euros or pounds or dollars (I know it isn't the same but it is an approximation anyway) and you pay the VAT plus some other tax (such as consumer's tax on energy products, tobacco and alcohol). For a single SAK or Multitool declared up to 90 euros don't expect to pay anything, even if it's cast with diamonds and platinum, but there are some rare suprises from time to time.
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: Grathr on January 07, 2014, 05:44:28 PM
Comments on Norway:
The toll limit is for boight items is $33 without shipping. However if the item costs more than $33 then you have to pay toll on the shipping as well.

Example: $33 SAK + $12 shipping= no toll.

$35 SAK + $10shipping= toll:$45*0,25= $11.25 + customs fee ($15-20)


Sent from a device made from star dust using Tapatalk (http://tapatalk.com/m?id=1)
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: RamoN on February 04, 2014, 11:10:57 PM
Well my country laws on international purchases have recently gone to hell.

Argentina:

As of now we can only have 2 shipments per year subject to a tax of 50% on customs plus a 35% they charge over your payment+shipping on any international purchase.  :poh:

Not happy with that we have to fill a form declaring were we got the money from, etc.

If the item plus shipping cost is of less than u$s 25 you are free of taxes which is almost impossible.


Sooo i just bought a knife online and after that no more importing nothing for me until this dreaded goverment changes.  :rant:
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: WWW on April 08, 2014, 04:27:34 PM
I'd like to explain about Brazil.

Any imported goods declared with more than 50 US$ are taxed in 60%, product cost+shipping. Those items can remain in customs for months depending on the country that is coming from.

Shipments transported by couriers (FEDEX, UPS, DHL) are always taxed in 100% doesn't matter the declared value.

Marking goods as "gift" does not guarantee that will pass through customs, they do a random analysis in the lot, so your item can be taxed if they feel that it should, The same apply for items that seems to worth more than 50US$ and was declared with less than that, as SAKs are small and do not call attention usually it pass through fine even if it was a couple of hundreds of dollars.

Just want to give you this overview so folks can understand why sometimes Brazilians ask to lower declaration values, taxes are huge here.... :-[ and the government does not justify these taxes with benefits for the people.

Really interesting thread enki! :tu:

  I just heard on the news that (and I could be wrong, I'll check the info) as long as you buy from a person and not a company, if the value of the purchase+shipping is under US$50 the taxes are not applied (not guaranteed, I've heard of purchases that really were under the 50 mark and got taxed). So any purchases, even under US$50, made from any company will be charged.   :rant: :facepalm:
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: enki_ck on April 08, 2014, 08:14:18 PM
Yeah, same here, the theory part. ::) $26 when buying from a company and $50 if buying from a private person, though they still sometimes charge you even if you buy from a private person or ebay. :-\ It's a gamble, even if you play by the rules doesn't matter they will. :(
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: rmagralha on April 09, 2014, 02:01:39 AM

I'd like to explain about Brazil.

Any imported goods declared with more than 50 US$ are taxed in 60%, product cost+shipping. Those items can remain in customs for months depending on the country that is coming from.

Shipments transported by couriers (FEDEX, UPS, DHL) are always taxed in 100% doesn't matter the declared value.

Marking goods as "gift" does not guarantee that will pass through customs, they do a random analysis in the lot, so your item can be taxed if they feel that it should, The same apply for items that seems to worth more than 50US$ and was declared with less than that, as SAKs are small and do not call attention usually it pass through fine even if it was a couple of hundreds of dollars.

Just want to give you this overview so folks can understand why sometimes Brazilians ask to lower declaration values, taxes are huge here.... :-[ and the government does not justify these taxes with benefits for the people.

Really interesting thread enki! :tu:

  I just heard on the news that (and I could be wrong, I'll check the info) as long as you buy from a person and not a company, if the value of the purchase+shipping is under US$50 the taxes are not applied (not guaranteed, I've heard of purchases that really were under the 50 mark and got taxed). So any purchases, even under US$50, made from any company will be charged.   :rant: :facepalm:

In theory....unfortunately....EMS is taxed anyway for example. But you are right, that is what they say.
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: Crow on May 26, 2014, 09:14:24 PM
Finnish customs rules have changed. Outside EU. Now you have to pay 24% Tax of product that value is 22€. And if you get a gift value more than 45€. Also you have to pay manufacturing tax of 2,5-7,5%.
Minimum manufacturing tax is 10€ and minimum VAT is 5€. If tax is less than those, you do not have to pay it.
Postal fees are added to value of product,  if product value is more than 22€. So you have to pay VAT from that aswell.
Seller should always add a receipt or invoice of somekind, when sending stuff to Finland.
I hope i used right terms/translation. And everyone understands.
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: bmot on May 27, 2014, 10:45:04 AM
Finnish customs rules have changed. Outside EU. Now you have to pay 24% Tax of product that value is 22€. And if you get a gift value more than 45€. Also you have to pay manufacturing tax of 2,5-7,5%.
Minimum manufacturing tax is 10€ and minimum VAT is 5€. If tax is less than those, you do not have to pay it.
Postal fees are added to value of product,  if product value is more than 22€. So you have to pay VAT from that aswell.
Seller should always add a receipt or invoice of somekind, when sending stuff to Finland.
I hope i used right terms/translation. And everyone understands.


So... What -is- manufacturing tax?  :think:


Sounds like your getting smurfed quite hard, there.  :facepalm:  Do they tax every single package, or do they just pick at random?
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: Crow on May 27, 2014, 12:02:56 PM
I do not know What it really is. I think it might be called tariff. This is what they make me pay. Basically they should tax everything That costs more than 22€, but sometimes something might slip through.
Here Where I live, Vic Spartan costs 22€, Lm Rebar 75€ cheapest.
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: bmot on May 27, 2014, 04:31:53 PM
Some input for ze Netherlands:


When importing into the Netherlands, the following rules are in play. A difference is made between buying  from "organisations or businesses" and buying/getting a gift from private persons
 
 
Buying from "organisations or businesses":
 
From an EU country, you don't have to pay any taxes.
 
From a country outside of the EU, it's a bit harder:
  No taxes if the value of the products (without shipping or insurances) is less than €22,-
   Only VAT if the value is between €22,- and €150,-
   
VAT is 21% or 6% depending on the product
 
Import taxes depend on the product, as well, but they're less clear about it. It seems to be between 0% and 15%.
 
According to the Dutch customs website: "in almost all cases, the shipping company will take care of the taxes. When they do this, they can charge you for:
  Costs that the company makes for the taxing (for lack of a better word)
   Other costs the company makes when doing work for you
   
 
Receiving a gift from  a private person:
 
No taxes within the EU
 
From outside of the EU:
  No taxes if the value is less than €45,-
   
Watch out, there's limits on the amount of alcoholics, tabacco and perfumes you can import.
 
 
Personal experience addition: Even thought the official site says nothing about it, chances that you do get charged taxes are not too high, I've been charged twice by now, over a whole lot of packages, so that's not too bad :)
Title: Re: Guide for the international trader
Post by: enki_ck on May 27, 2014, 08:04:35 PM
Thanks for the added info, guys. :cheers:

Keep it coming. :salute: