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Dutch Army Knives 93125

Newbie Posts: 5
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #720 on: May 11, 2021, 08:40:40 AM »
No, it’s seen on a number of other klu65 knives. I’m not sure what the purpose is of that tool however in earlier posts I have seen the same tool. It’s very stout, thick and seems very heavy duty. There is an opener and a punch on the other side as well. I’m really interested in collecting them however there are none to be found in Canada that I have seen. Would you happen to know of any other sources for others in the klu series?

Likewise
Jr. Member Posts: 85 Quis custodiet ipsos custodes
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #721 on: May 11, 2021, 10:47:52 AM »
 :hatsoff:

It is a can opener

Dulce et decorum est
Jr. Member Posts: 85 Quis custodiet ipsos custodes
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #722 on: May 11, 2021, 11:21:53 AM »
 :hatsoff:

On September 19, 1931, Eugen Hollaender founded the Apeldoornsche Messenfabriek N.V. Haagse Import Mij. Olanda. This would later become Amefa. In the 1940s, this company also made and supplied pocket knives to the Wehrmacht. The owner E. Hollaender still had the German nationality and for that reason he could also close a deal with Germany. The knife was therefore also used in the German Wehrmacht. The knife has a red fibre handle and was made until WWII. The knife is not marked.
 
It probably served as an "example" for the Dutch knife that was made by Amefa after the war.
After World War II, the pocket knives came in the equipment of a Dutch soldier. It all started in the early 1950s when a Dutch company AMEFA (Apeldoornse Messen Fabriek) started producing pocket knives consisting of 4 parts.
The very first knife M1952 from Instalex (International Staalwaren Export Company), part of Amefa. Was issued in the mid 1950's. It is probably the first knife in the "new" Model 1952 series.
 
The Amefa era lasted until the early 1980s when the Swiss company Victorinox started supplying the Dutch service knives. This still happens today.

In the 1950s the knives were only marked with KL without the addition of the year. It is not known how many knives have been put into circulation for Amefa.
In the early 1950s (before KL61), Amefa made knives where position of the bottle opener and the can opener were ‘swapped’ compared to the later models.
The Dutch army knives M1952 were made by AMEFA (Apeldoornse Messen Fabriek) - logo is on the ricasso, had a handle with brown fibre grip plates and a D-ring. These models were issued in limited numbers in the period 1950 - 1983. The first models only had the indication KL (Koninklijke Landmacht) on the handle and no year.
 
The KL61 is the first knife with an annual listing. In 1962 there was no production. Production resumed in 1963 and 1965 with the KL (army) knife and also a KLU (air force) knife. No production took place in 1964.
No production took place in the years 1967, '68 and '69. The next issue was 1970 and was also the last.
 
In 1971 there was no more production and the Model 1952 period was also ended.
   


Dulce et decorum est
Newbie Posts: 5
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #723 on: May 11, 2021, 04:36:41 PM »
Thank you so much for the information, that’s a tremendous amount of knowledge packed into a few paragraphs. It looks like you have a great collection, I’m experiencing envy for the first time in a few years. Thanks again, I really appreciate the response and all the information, it’s a great start for me to begin reading up on the tool development.

Regards,

Wayne
Hero Member Posts: 834
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #724 on: May 12, 2021, 03:59:44 AM »
:hatsoff:

It is a can opener

Aggie, I trust you. So: how would one operate that sort of can opener? I can see pushing straight down, or pounding down to get a puncture, but then what?
Newbie Posts: 5
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #725 on: May 12, 2021, 04:52:16 AM »
Aggie, I trust you. So: how would one operate that sort of can opener? I can see pushing straight down, or pounding down to get a puncture, but then what?- end quote

I guess the greater question is why are they on the klu65 sets? Other photos show the same small stout blade.

Thoughts? I think the other person in the thread has photos of the same item with the same blade/tool, correct me if I’m wrong (I’m not, I checked them carefully.😉)

So ideally what would that be used for outside of a can opener?

Regards Wayne
Jr. Member Posts: 85 Quis custodiet ipsos custodes
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #726 on: May 12, 2021, 12:08:27 PM »
 :hatsoff:

It takes some "practice" to open a can with this can opener. We learned this during the basic training.

Push the opener (with a bang) through the top of the can. The protrusion is of course on the outside and lies with the straight side on the rim of the can. If you are right-handed, pull the pocket knife towards you and follow the edge of the can until you are completely "round". If you are left-handed, you push the knife away from you and follow the edge.

You "cut", as it were, with the "sharp" side of the knife through the tin using the protrusion as a lever.

Dulce et decorum est
No Life Club Posts: 1,944

Ivo be

****** *
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #727 on: May 12, 2021, 02:10:41 PM »
Who knows something about these knives from FOSCO , KL95 ?

The Vikings say "when your battle axe is to short do one step forward"
Jr. Member Posts: 85 Quis custodiet ipsos custodes
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #728 on: May 12, 2021, 04:52:10 PM »
 :hatsoff:

The KL95 from Fosco is the only knife from the M52 and M61 series that does not have a carrying eye. The quality of the Fosco knives was not up to par and were therefore not used for long. The biggest problem with these knives was consistency; all knives looked different. The back springs do not go all the way back when the knife was closed; the notches for the nail are not the same.

Very shortly after the issue, the contract was cancelled and the knives were taken back and destroyed. The knife was only issued in 1995.

There are two versions of the KL95 from Fosco: an aluminium (alox) version (1st version) and the stainless steel version (2nd version). The stainless steel Fosco KL 95 is a derivative of the US MIL-K-818-D.

It is not known to me whether this version was actually used by the armed forces

Dulce et decorum est
No Life Club Posts: 1,944

Ivo be

****** *
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #729 on: May 12, 2021, 08:23:05 PM »
OK, many thanks for the explanation.  :tu:
I found them last week on the market and bought 2 of them, it was the first time I saw them. You are right, the quality is very poor.

The Vikings say "when your battle axe is to short do one step forward"
Jr. Member Posts: 85 Quis custodiet ipsos custodes
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #730 on: May 13, 2021, 01:31:33 PM »
 :hatsoff:

The Fosco KL95 is rare - you don't see them much. They were so bad that they were even thrown away. So there are not many left.

Back to the can opener.

Indeed, it is not easy to open a can with this tool, but it was thought by "people" when we reposition the can opener, it may be easier. It turned out that the problem was not the location of the can opener, but the thing itself.

We went through the era of the brown Amefa knives and kept struggling to open the tins. (Perhaps the "Opening cans" lessons were dropped during basic training.)

But, when the era of these knives came to an end, it was thought that we could do with a knife without a can opener. So the next model (alox version) from Amefa made its appearance: A 3-part pocket knife, stainless steel with a ribbed aluminium body. Folding knife, bottle opener / wide flat screwdriver and flat awl. The can opener was supplied separately.

These things, after they were used, had to be kept in your pocket until you needed them again. And of course you would have lost the can opener. This "separate can opener" period lasted 3 years: 1972, 1973 and 1974 (incl. KLU74).

From 1975 the 2nd type was introduced, with 4 parts. These knives all had brass liners. The first two production years were 1975 and 1976. In 1977 no production took place. In the following years the KL78, KL79, KL80, KL81 and KL 82 were released.

Dulce et decorum est
Hero Member Posts: 813

EMZ nl

*****
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #731 on: May 18, 2021, 06:45:32 PM »
Finally I found a KLU 63, made by Amefa.
In fact now only one is missing in my older type KL/KM/KLU collection: The KLu 74.
Jr. Member Posts: 85 Quis custodiet ipsos custodes
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #732 on: May 19, 2021, 10:05:28 AM »
 :hatsoff:

Looking good EMZ  :tu: and good luck with your search for the Klu 74

Dulce et decorum est
No Life Club Posts: 3,002
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #733 on: May 19, 2021, 11:20:18 AM »
Congratulations on finding it :like:
Hero Member Posts: 834
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #734 on: June 03, 2021, 06:31:29 AM »
Finally I found a KLU 63, made by Amefa.
In fact now only one is missing in my older type KL/KM/KLU collection: The KLu 74.

U r awesome. Keep it up. The Dutch Army should give you a citation for assembling part of their legacy.
Hero Member Posts: 813

EMZ nl

*****
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #735 on: June 03, 2021, 10:01:44 AM »
Thanks for the compliments! I wish the Dutch Army could offer me (and Agamemnon, Glenf and Osos as well) a financial citation... :whistle:

However, I will post in near future some pictures of my latest acquisition, a Wenger Master with blade lock. Please have patience!
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,536 aka "G-Fiddle" and "Glen-Fizzle"
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #736 on: June 03, 2021, 01:03:14 PM »
Thanks for the compliments! I wish the Dutch Army could offer me (and Agamemnon, Glenf and Osos as well) a financial citation... :whistle:

However, I will post in near future some pictures of my latest acquisition, a Wenger Master with blade lock. Please have patience!

 :hatsoff:

[--- arms length ---] (-.-) 

                                ^-- where the cat sits
Hero Member Posts: 813

EMZ nl

*****
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #737 on: June 04, 2021, 04:36:21 PM »
Okay guys, what's absolutely necessary when you don't want to be captured and made a prisoner of war?
Answer: A compass and a SAK!
Oh yes, a credit card and a helicopter would also be very helpful, but let's asume your spouse is using your credit card at that moment, and the helicopter is in repair. So, you still need your compass and SAK.
But where to find these items? Well, in an official Dutch Army Survival Kit of course!

Although I'm not planning to escape and survive, I recently bought me this survival set from an on-line army/navy store. To my VERY suprise it was equiped with this beautiful, NIB Wenger Security 52 pocket knife.  :ahhh
In my opinion this is the best small survival pocket knife ever made.
Hero Member Posts: 813

EMZ nl

*****
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #738 on: June 04, 2021, 04:40:56 PM »
BTW: The survival kit is dated in 2001.
Official Dutch Army name is: "Gordeltasuitrusting",  which translates into 'girdle bag equipment'.
No Life Club Posts: 2,421
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #739 on: June 05, 2021, 12:28:40 AM »
Gosh, Recta compasses! I once had a Recta dp6 prism, sadly long since lost  :facepalm: But now replaced with the Suunto dp6 world wide and mc-2 worldwide compasses from Finland rather than Switzerland- both great compasses! Still sad to have lost that original matchbox prism compass (took me through several exercises and explorations of the FSU) though my eyesight wouldn’t work with it now…. O tempora, o mores, o me miserum senex sum! :facepalm:
Hero Member Posts: 834
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #740 on: June 05, 2021, 07:51:09 AM »
EMZ,

It looks like a Wenger Journeyman by another name. Excellent.

The Dutch approach to survival involves a close shave (razors/gel) and a fresh smile (toothbrush).

A great find.

 :like:
Hero Member Posts: 834
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #741 on: June 05, 2021, 07:51:26 AM »
Nice compass too.
Hero Member Posts: 834
Re: Dutch Army Knives
« Reply #742 on: June 05, 2021, 08:05:58 AM »
I guess the journeyman lacks a saw, so, yes, the Security 52 gets my vote for best Wenger survival knife.💪👍

 

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