Multitool.org
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
+-

Hello Lurker! Remove this ad and much more by logging in.


Benchmade Rescue Tools 5492

Head Turd Polisher Administrator Just Bananas Posts: 61,365 Optimum instrumentum est inter aures
Benchmade Rescue Tools
« on: February 16, 2012, 01:46:41 AM »
Simple yet effective rescue tools from Benchmade- both of these predate the current Houdini and Houdini Pro models.

Benchmade 5 Hook Safety Cutter:



Strap cutter, bottle opener and oxygen wrench- good combination of tools for any emergency responder!



Benchmade 7 hook:



More comfortable strap cutter, but no bottle opener, so it's a bit of a tradeoff!



They may not look like much, but their simplicity means there's almost no chance of failure.  No mechanical or moving parts mean these tools will last forever, never coming apart, seizing up of breaking- in my mind reliability in a rescue tool is second only to it's ability to do the job.  I wish more folks manufacturing rescue tools felt the same way.

I think only folks who have been cut from a destroyed car (or the people cutting them out) should be allowed to approve tools like this for production.  Bean counters need to take a back seat to everyone else in this segment.

Def

Leave the dents as they are- let your belongings show their scars as proudly as you do yours.
Head Turd Polisher Administrator Just Bananas Posts: 61,365 Optimum instrumentum est inter aures
Re: Benchmade Rescue Tools
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2012, 11:08:26 PM »
Since apparently no one gave a poop about these yesterday, here's the Benchmade 8 Hook to add to the mix!





Remind you of any new release tools shown at this year's SHOT Show?  :D

Def

Leave the dents as they are- let your belongings show their scars as proudly as you do yours.
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 8,550
Re: Benchmade Rescue Tools
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2012, 09:40:26 AM »
Any idea on why the lanyard ring on 5 is open? I can't figure out what purpose could it serve.
Head Turd Polisher Administrator Just Bananas Posts: 61,365 Optimum instrumentum est inter aures
Re: Benchmade Rescue Tools
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2012, 02:23:11 PM »
I have no idea really, although I would speculate that it is so you could easily feed some webbing or similar into it as a convenient carry method.  Your guess is as good as mine on that though.

Def

Leave the dents as they are- let your belongings show their scars as proudly as you do yours.
Sr. Member Posts: 318
Benchmade Rescue Tools
« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2012, 03:22:15 PM »
I'll stick with my Houdini's. I have one on every car keychain and hope to never need to use one.

Dave


Sent from my iPad2 using Tapatalk

I EDC'd a SAK before MacGyver did...
Head Turd Polisher Administrator Just Bananas Posts: 61,365 Optimum instrumentum est inter aures
Re: Benchmade Rescue Tools
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2012, 11:09:41 PM »
Yeah, these are designed more for professional use, not so much for the individual.  When it comes to the Houdini though I actually prefer the Res-Q-Me Tool.



http://www.multitool.org/Miscellaneous-Tools/Keyring-Tools/2007/10/10/resqme.html

Def

Leave the dents as they are- let your belongings show their scars as proudly as you do yours.
No Life Club Posts: 1,630 Wanna give blood? Run from my K9...
Re: Benchmade Rescue Tools
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2012, 03:31:06 PM »
With Grant's prior blessing, I'll post this in the hopes that it may be of some help to other members. Cutting seatbelts is a discussion that comes up rather frequently at the Police Academy here in my state and there is absolutely no limit to what those "rookies" are carrying to accomplish that task. They have all the latest gadgets.
Recently, and as a result of this forum, myself and some other instructors began sharing stories about seatbelts we'd cut before and what worked and what did not. This turned into an un-scientific series of tests that led back to a technique that we had all used in one form or another because it simply works, everytime. In our profession reliability is more important than anything...think firearms, tazers, knives etc etc etc.
There has been much discussion here and show and tell of "rescue tools' and all sorts of v-cutters and what-nots to cut seatbelts. Our collective opinion through field experience was that cutting a seatbelt in a junkyard was considerably different than cutting a seatbelt supporting a live human, in a mangled vehicle that is on fire or flooding or whatever. Everyone agreed that the "rescue rings" were not the best instrument, for several reasons. BTW this is not meant to offend those who love the "rings" I think they're cool too, this is just offered to you as another option.
We found that the good ol' half plain, half serrated, well sharpened folder really came into it's own here and as Grant stated in another thread, served dual purposes while not unnecissarilly taking up valuable real estate in one's pocket or on one's belt. The technique is as follows.
Open your folder and turn your hand palm up so your blade is facing you and the back of the blade is toward the victim. Locate the lap portion of the seatbelt, to the left of the buckle on the driver's side and to the right of the buckle on the passenger side. Make your cut here, this way the seatbelt will come free of the b-pillar area of the car (this is the upright post behind the front door seam) and you shouldn't have to mess with the buckle since after impact it is most likely inertia locked. Start with the forward, plain edge of your blade and cut upward through the seatbelt, dragging it through to the back serrations. If that doesn't completely sever the seatbelt simply make another motion pulling the blade back toward you, this time through the serrations first and this will certainly complete the cut and sever the seatbelt for you. It's basically a two stroke sawing motion going forward first then backward. If done properly this will minimize any blade exposure to yourself or the victim.
Before closing, I would like to say that while the thought of extracating someone from a vehicle is certainly noble, unless there are exigent circumstances such as those mentioned above, it is often better to simply stabilize the patient's head and neck and wait for rescue personell to arrive. This way you don't inadvertantly excascerbate a head or cervical injury and possibly put yourself in a position of liability for simply being a good samaritan.
Once again, my intention was not to offend anyone who swears by "rescue rings' and if I did, I sincerely apologize. I simply wanted to offer you another "club" in your bag in the hopes that it helps. With that said I hope none of you ever have to use it but if you should, at least you'll have options if all you have is a half and half folder. For the record, I do own some of the "ring tools" but do not carry them, nor does my girlfriend who is an ambulance based 16 year ALS Paramedic. Just food for thought my friends, thanks for listening and my best to all.
Respectfully;
Stew and K9 partner Ajo... :cheers:

" If it was built by matt2silver then I want2buy it...
No Life Club Posts: 3,796 Hack Virtuoso
Benchmade Rescue Tools
« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2012, 04:26:15 PM »
With Grant's prior blessing, I'll post this in the hopes that it may be of some help to other members. Cutting seatbelts is a discussion that comes up rather frequently at the Police Academy here in my state and there is absolutely no limit to what those "rookies" are carrying to accomplish that task. They have all the latest gadgets.
Recently, and as a result of this forum, myself and some other instructors began sharing stories about seatbelts we'd cut before and what worked and what did not. This turned into an un-scientific series of tests that led back to a technique that we had all used in one form or another because it simply works, everytime. In our profession reliability is more important than anything...think firearms, tazers, knives etc etc etc.
There has been much discussion here and show and tell of "rescue tools' and all sorts of v-cutters and what-nots to cut seatbelts. Our collective opinion through field experience was that cutting a seatbelt in a junkyard was considerably different than cutting a seatbelt supporting a live human, in a mangled vehicle that is on fire or flooding or whatever. Everyone agreed that the "rescue rings" were not the best instrument, for several reasons. BTW this is not meant to offend those who love the "rings" I think they're cool too, this is just offered to you as another option.
We found that the good ol' half plain, half serrated, well sharpened folder really came into it's own here and as Grant stated in another thread, served dual purposes while not unnecissarilly taking up valuable real estate in one's pocket or on one's belt. The technique is as follows.
Open your folder and turn your hand palm up so your blade is facing you and the back of the blade is toward the victim. Locate the lap portion of the seatbelt, to the left of the buckle on the driver's side and to the right of the buckle on the passenger side. Make your cut here, this way the seatbelt will come free of the b-pillar area of the car (this is the upright post behind the front door seam) and you shouldn't have to mess with the buckle since after impact it is most likely inertia locked. Start with the forward, plain edge of your blade and cut upward through the seatbelt, dragging it through to the back serrations. If that doesn't completely sever the seatbelt simply make another motion pulling the blade back toward you, this time through the serrations first and this will certainly complete the cut and sever the seatbelt for you. It's basically a two stroke sawing motion going forward first then backward. If done properly this will minimize any blade exposure to yourself or the victim.
Before closing, I would like to say that while the thought of extracating someone from a vehicle is certainly noble, unless there are exigent circumstances such as those mentioned above, it is often better to simply stabilize the patient's head and neck and wait for rescue personell to arrive. This way you don't inadvertantly excascerbate a head or cervical injury and possibly put yourself in a position of liability for simply being a good samaritan.
Once again, my intention was not to offend anyone who swears by "rescue rings' and if I did, I sincerely apologize. I simply wanted to offer you another "club" in your bag in the hopes that it helps. With that said I hope none of you ever have to use it but if you should, at least you'll have options if all you have is a half and half folder. For the record, I do own some of the "ring tools" but do not carry them, nor does my girlfriend who is an ambulance based 16 year ALS Paramedic. Just food for thought my friends, thanks for listening and my best to all.
Respectfully;
Stew and K9 partner Ajo... :cheers:

Amazing bit of info!

I actually use 'rescue cutters' to cut open pallets occasionally and of course open bottles. I think it comes down to practice, calm attitude and leaving the real rescuing to professionals, unless you are trained to :)

Why stop now?

Visit the whole Skinth family here: http://www.skinthsolutions.com

Keep up with The Skinths on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SkinthSolutions

Shapeways - Metro's Q-branch:
http://www.shapeways.com/shops/metro-qbranch

PayPal: metrogradegoods [at} gmail. com
No Life Club Posts: 1,630 Wanna give blood? Run from my K9...
Re: Benchmade Rescue Tools
« Reply #8 on: March 06, 2012, 05:26:56 PM »
Very well said Metro. I certainly don't wan't to discourage anyone from completeing a rescue if needed, I just wanted to illustrate another way of doing it and some of the unseen hazards that could befall someone who is just trying to help. Thanks for weighing in sir,
Stew...

" If it was built by matt2silver then I want2buy it...
Head Turd Polisher Administrator Just Bananas Posts: 61,365 Optimum instrumentum est inter aures
Re: Benchmade Rescue Tools
« Reply #9 on: March 06, 2012, 05:49:13 PM »
I'm in complete agreement with all of the above, and it reminds me of the standard EMT argument.  In the past we've had people sign up here and ask what a good tool for an EMT is, or we've had EMT's (usually newly minted folks) ask what the best tool for cutting seatbelts and clothing are.  Invariably you get numerous responses from a variety of people, but the bottom line is that 90% (or more) of the time an EMT needs to cut something, out comes their standard issue shears.

No fancy geegaws or doodads, no dedicated tool, no high priced specialized instrument, just the same tool they use for a hundred other things.  Which of course leads me to wonder....


WHY THE HELL IS NO ONE MAKING A GOOD SET OF SHEARS OR A SHEAR BASED MULTITOOL?

Def

Leave the dents as they are- let your belongings show their scars as proudly as you do yours.
Hero Member Posts: 500
Re: Benchmade Rescue Tools
« Reply #10 on: March 06, 2012, 07:05:56 PM »
The bandage cutting shears are probably the best and safest tool for cutting seat belts and most EMT personal have them on their their belt pouch.If I was first on scene and there was fire or water rescue I would attempt cutting and rescue but in other situations an untrained person can do more harm than good.
Head Turd Polisher Administrator Just Bananas Posts: 61,365 Optimum instrumentum est inter aures
Re: Benchmade Rescue Tools
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2012, 12:39:53 AM »
Absolutely- and I hope everyone reading here is smart enough to know that.  I assume most of the folks here are intelligent, and that's why they are here!  :D

Def

Leave the dents as they are- let your belongings show their scars as proudly as you do yours.
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,417
Re: Benchmade Rescue Tools
« Reply #12 on: April 18, 2012, 04:09:52 AM »
I`ve got a couple Benchmade #7`s that I have used to cut plastic straps at work. Works good on baling twine also.

What? Enablers! Are you serrrrious? Where? I dont see any.
Hold Fast
Head Turd Polisher Administrator Just Bananas Posts: 61,365 Optimum instrumentum est inter aures
Re: Benchmade Rescue Tools
« Reply #13 on: April 18, 2012, 01:57:15 PM »
They do indeed cut well.  The real issue I find with these hooks is that they have a real problem starting a cut through a hem, especially in jeans.  A good knife can power through the hem easily enough, and shears cut through the hem nicely as well, but starting a cut on clothing in an emergency can cause them to hang a little bit.

For general use like cutting straps and twine they are fantastic and very hard to beat.

Def

Leave the dents as they are- let your belongings show their scars as proudly as you do yours.
No Life Club Posts: 1,265
Benchmade Rescue Tools
« Reply #14 on: April 18, 2012, 02:47:49 PM »
I must say when my 5 showed up, straight out of the box it was probably the sharpest blade I have ever handled no exaggeration. It went through a piece of large braided rope with almost no effort. I do understand though, a hem on a pair of jeans is quite thick and holding the material taught is not always an option. 


Stay multi my friends
Head Turd Polisher Administrator Just Bananas Posts: 61,365 Optimum instrumentum est inter aures
Re: Benchmade Rescue Tools
« Reply #15 on: April 20, 2012, 03:25:19 AM »
If circumstances were ideal, there probably wouldn't have been an accident!  :P

Def

Leave the dents as they are- let your belongings show their scars as proudly as you do yours.

 

Donations

Operational Funds

Help us keep the Unworkable working!
Donate with PayPal!
August Goal: $300.00
Due Date: Aug 31
Total Receipts: $60.00
PayPal Fees: $3.14
Net Balance: $56.86
Below Goal: $243.14
Site Currency: USD
19% 
August Donations

Community Links


Powered by EzPortal
SMF 2.0.17 | SMF © 2019, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.049 seconds with 32 queries.
© 2018 Defender Web & Tool