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Cruxspension

J-sews · 42 · 6910

us Offline hawkchucker

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Re: Cruxspension
Reply #30 on: January 30, 2008, 10:41:58 PM
Actually the only time I thiink this is an issue is this tool. It has alum. for the pivot. I really think that is kinda lame.
S


Offline damota

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Re: Cruxspension
Reply #31 on: January 31, 2008, 12:55:07 AM
Actually the only time I thiink this is an issue is this tool. It has alum. for the pivot. I really think that is kinda lame.

Question to Bob, can you do a magnet test on all the Gerber butterfly pliers you have to see if they all are aluminum, please.

Dave


us Offline J-sews

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Re: Cruxspension
Reply #32 on: January 31, 2008, 03:57:45 AM
The Suspension handles are steel. I'm guessing stainless steel, but with the titanium nitride plating, heck it could be ordinary steel underneath.

The Method and the Crux have cast aluminum handles. (for reference, the Crux weighs in at 7.8 oz (219g), which is a full ounce lighter than the steel Suspension)
In order to be certain of having the right tool for every job.........one must first acquire a lot of tools


scotland Offline Sea Monster

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Re: Cruxspension
Reply #33 on: January 31, 2008, 07:36:40 AM
Quote
The Suspension handles are steel. I'm guessing stainless steel, but with the titanium nitride plating, heck it could be ordinary steel underneath.
S/S non magnetic.


us Offline hawkchucker

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Re: Cruxspension
Reply #34 on: January 31, 2008, 11:27:14 AM
It wasnt the handles guys that broke. It was the pivot.
S


Offline damota

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Re: Cruxspension
Reply #35 on: January 31, 2008, 11:57:49 AM
The Suspension handles are steel. I'm guessing stainless steel, but with the titanium nitride plating, heck it could be ordinary steel underneath.

The Method and the Crux have cast aluminum handles. (for reference, the Crux weighs in at 7.8 oz (219g), which is a full ounce lighter than the steel Suspension)

Bob
It was the pivoting rivet part that broke on 'hawkchucker's' suspension (as I understand it) now if all these Chinese model butterfly opening tools have been changed to IMO an inferior grade metal just to keep the cost down (even if aircraft grade) I for one could not recommend the tools to anyone. I also would consider a S/S less than 420c iffy for the pivot or head on a working plier (OK for a back up tool I guess) but we could only guess the grade of a S/S component even with a spark test. To hell with rust/staining, strength is what is needed in a working plier head and especially the pivot.

Dave


Offline ringzero

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Re: Cruxspension
Reply #36 on: January 31, 2008, 05:15:50 PM
Actually the only time I thiink this is an issue is this tool. It has alum. for the pivot. I really think that is kinda lame.


I just carefully looked over my Suspension, and I don't believe it has any aluminum parts in it, period.

I checked handles, pivot pins, implements, pliers, and lock releases with a small magnet.  Magnet sticks to all those parts, meaning they all contain iron.

So, they are some type of steel, most likely stainless steel from the look of them and the fact they exhibit no rust after several months of use.

Maybe it's not the best grade of stainless, but the implements have held up well so far after doing a fair amount of work around house and yard.

The Titanium-Nitride coating on the handles seems quite tough, it looks cool, and has held up well so far in use.

I didn't expect the Suspension would be made of A2 stainless tool steel with 154CM knife blades, because I picked it up for $28 at Lowes!

.
N


us Offline J-sews

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Re: Cruxspension
Reply #37 on: February 01, 2008, 03:10:01 AM
Quote
The Suspension handles are steel. I'm guessing stainless steel, but with the titanium nitride plating, heck it could be ordinary steel underneath.
S/S non magnetic.

A common assumption, but not true. Check your PST with a magnet.

300-series stainless steels are non-magnetic, due to a high nickel content, but very soft for the same reason.  This grade is not suitable for tools of any kind. Highly corrosion resistant. (303, 304, 316, 18-8 are common examples in the USA)

400-series stainless steels have a higher iron content, can be hardened, and do stick to a magnet. This is what tools, knives, and firearms are made from. The tradeoff for being hardenable is a much lower resistance to corrosion. (416, 420, 440C are common examples)



 
In order to be certain of having the right tool for every job.........one must first acquire a lot of tools


us Offline J-sews

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Re: Cruxspension
Reply #38 on: February 01, 2008, 03:14:31 AM
Hawkchucker, I did not take my Suspension apart, but it appears that all the pivot screws on mine are stainless steel. Weird that one of yours was pot metal or aluminum. I can certainly see how such a pin would fail easily.
In order to be certain of having the right tool for every job.........one must first acquire a lot of tools


scotland Offline Sea Monster

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Re: Cruxspension
Reply #39 on: February 01, 2008, 10:20:41 AM
Quote
A common assumption, but not true. Check your PST with a magnet.

300-series stainless steels are non-magnetic, due to a high nickel content, but very soft for the same reason.  This grade is not suitable for tools of any kind. Highly corrosion resistant. (303, 304, 316, 18-8 are common examples in the USA)

400-series stainless steels have a higher iron content, can be hardened, and do stick to a magnet. This is what tools, knives, and firearms are made from. The tradeoff for being hardenable is a much lower resistance to corrosion. (416, 420, 440C are common examples)

Sorry.
I did actually know that, but I sell a lot of 316 steel stuff, so I get used to "proving" it to customers with a magnet (then they point out my tools stick to the magnet, and I explain to them exactly what you just said)


Offline damota

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Re: Cruxspension
Reply #40 on: February 01, 2008, 10:10:17 PM
Thank goodness, it looks as though 'Hawkchucker' got the bad apple then and they have not stooped as low as was beginning to think. I know if you had any trouble changing it at the store Gerbers after sales is very good, they dealt with me very fairly, direct, at their cost, within a week and I live in the UK. All set up by email.

Dave


us Offline hawkchucker

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Re: Cruxspension
Reply #41 on: February 01, 2008, 10:19:19 PM
The one I had also was a leftover bought at wallyworld without the box. I got it for cheep, and no clue how old it was, but the thing was certainly not a steel pivot point. It jsut poped right out and the head sheared from the post.
S


 

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