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What did you use your Sak on today? 414451

Newbie Posts: 18
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9210 on: May 03, 2021, 11:19:00 PM »
In my introduction thread it was mentioned that we like pictures here,,, so here's a couple.

I spent the day prepping for an upcoming BBQ competition this coming weekend. That included a battery change in the Thermoworks digital thermometer. I also broke out the kit and touched up the edge on the small Tinker and the Esquire.





« Last Edit: May 04, 2021, 01:35:45 AM by GA1dad »

Jason - N4RBZ- A Harley can get you through times of no money better than money can get you through times of no Harley____O~`o__
No Life Club Posts: 1,809
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9211 on: May 04, 2021, 06:58:21 PM »
Used SwissChamp pliers to remove picture nail and the whole SwissChamp  as a hammer to relocate it, saved time on going to fetch an actual hammer.
Used small blade to open Amazon package.

Weasel
Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 20,198

Nix us

********* * *
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9212 on: May 05, 2021, 09:58:04 PM »
Used the corkscrew in my Wenger to remove a broken coupling from an in-ground irrigation system.






The coupling broke off close to the surface of the irrigation line. Close enough that I couldn't get my mutlitool pliers to grip it. Fortunately the Wenger was awl-ready in me pocket.  :tu:

I don't think I've even seen the corkscrew used in this way...so I'm claiming a first here!   :ahhh

heterodox, not in the box
Full Member Posts: 166
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9213 on: May 05, 2021, 10:51:59 PM »
Used the corkscrew in my Wenger to remove a broken coupling from an in-ground irrigation system.


(Image removed from quote.)



The coupling broke off close to the surface of the irrigation line. Close enough that I couldn't get my mutlitool pliers to grip it. Fortunately the Wenger was awl-ready in me pocket.  :tu:

I don't think I've even seen the corkscrew used in this way...so I'm claiming a first here!   :ahhh

 :like: :tu:
Sr. Member Posts: 338
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9214 on: May 06, 2021, 05:48:26 AM »
Cool usage, Nix!  :like: :like:
The corkscrew can be super handy with a little imagination  :tu:
Hero Member Posts: 769 Brick Bradford of multitool universe
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9215 on: May 06, 2021, 06:44:48 AM »
Good use Nix!

Lähetetty minun SM-T515 laitteesta Tapatalkilla


by this axe I rule
No Life Club Posts: 1,243 Hardwood sawyer, and follower of Jesus Christ
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9216 on: May 06, 2021, 06:56:29 AM »
Used SwissChamp pliers to remove picture nail and the whole SwissChamp  as a hammer to relocate it, saved time on going to fetch an actual hammer.
Used small blade to open Amazon package.
  :poh:
Wait....what?  :think:  ???   :o  :ahhh  :dwts: :sa:  :td:  :to:  :shrug:  :wait:  :bnghd:  :doh:  :megaslap:  :twak:  :facepalm:

This life is merely a staging ground for eternity. Are you preparing for the rest of forever?
No Life Club Posts: 1,809
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9217 on: May 06, 2021, 09:38:02 AM »
Used the corkscrew in my Wenger to remove a broken coupling from an in-ground irrigation system.


(Image removed from quote.)



The coupling broke off close to the surface of the irrigation line. Close enough that I couldn't get my mutlitool pliers to grip it. Fortunately the Wenger was awl-ready in me pocket.  :tu:

I don't think I've even seen the corkscrew used in this way...so I'm claiming a first here!   :ahhh
Great use of the cs


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Weasel
Just Bananas Posts: 75,882
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9218 on: May 06, 2021, 03:10:54 PM »
Great uses everyone  :like: :tu:

fail to prepare prepare to fail
Hero Member Posts: 721 The SAK Also Rises
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9219 on: May 06, 2021, 08:09:25 PM »
Cybertool L adapts as temporary rose pruner for replenishing indoor bouquet.

He had decided none of it was true, except what he carried with him everyday.-—SgtTowser
Hero Member Posts: 721 The SAK Also Rises
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9220 on: May 06, 2021, 08:11:43 PM »
Great use of the cs


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 :iagree:

I have said before VIC is missing a big market by not making a true gardener’s model in partnership with a sprinkler company with a PVC tube cutter tool, a head for adjusting sprinklers, and a tube puncture tool, etc.

He had decided none of it was true, except what he carried with him everyday.-—SgtTowser
Jr. Member Posts: 79
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9221 on: May 06, 2021, 11:28:07 PM »
Used the magnifying glass on this scientist to identify a monogram on an old- maybe late 1800s era silver plate fork that I found metal detecting today at an old homestead.
Hero Member Posts: 721 The SAK Also Rises
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9222 on: May 07, 2021, 12:10:26 AM »
Used the magnifying glass on this scientist to identify a monogram on an old- maybe late 1800s era silver plate fork that I found metal detecting today at an old homestead.

Cool find. Let us know if u find a maker’s mark. Have you ever metal detected a lesser US Civil War battlefield? I have always wondered if the lesser ones have been gone over?

The OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY has an online access to THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF THE WAR OF THE REBELLION (OR) that I used for Civil War research I did at one time. If you have not used the OR, it is a compilation of millions of Union and CSA war records completed around 1900 based on the decision of Union President Lincoln and Union General Halleck to use triplicate carbon paper for ALL communications by the Union government and its military. Lincoln and Halleck understood going in that the US WAR OF THE REBELLION could result in countless war time actions that could after the war lead to all manner of legal disputes and legal actions afterwards. Lincoln, the lawyer, wanted a paper trail that could either be used to defend his and the Union’s actions, or that could be altered/sanitized as need might later be.

Anyway, for 3/4s of a century at least the hard copy of the OR was so voluminous and so difficult to search that many war historians either only skimmed its surface, or ignored it entirely in writing even the most supposedly  “exhaustively researched” accounts of the US CIVIL WAR.

But then the internet came along and most if not all of the OR was scanned into an OR data base that can be searched to some degree by key words.

This is all a long preamble for giving you a metal detecting suggestion.

Obviously metal detecting a famous battlefield (e.g., Gettysburg, etc.) enshrined and preserved, as a national monument, would either not permit metal detecting, or where permitted, already long have been picked over by metal detectors.

But when One wades through the OR, one finds countless orders and memos from one officer to another  about tiny skirmishes, or raids, or temporary encampments, and these often report the route recently followed and the route that will next be taken. Often, the locations and routes are of utterly no consequence to Civil War historians writing mostly about big battles and about famous persons. But each of these locations, particularly sizable encampments stayed at for several days likely would have a debris/artifact    scatter that often would have been flooded, and lost to the eye in ensuing years, since armies then tended to encamp near water sources for themselves and their horses.

Likely foragers and scavengers trails along Sherman’s March to the sea have long been metal detected; same with the various approach paths to Gettysburg. But there were literally tens of thousands of encampments by both sides never mentioned in history books nor marked by battle monuments that metal detectors likely have not swept.

We need to know much more empirically about the US Civil War to understand what really happened during and shortly after that fateful time. I believe the future of our country lay in a much more empirically based understanding of the time. We have the incredible opportunity to converge  Geographic information systems with geology, topo maps,  mineral surveys, rail/Telegraph maps, farm land maps, battle maps, and artifact scatters to demythologize what both Union and CSA were fighting with, and over, and how they were expecting not only to win, but how they were expecting to benefit after victory. This convergence of information will eventually explain which elements of private oligarchy won and which lost, beyond the simplistic notion of Union and CSA. Both the Union and the CSA were constellations of foreign and domestic special interests; not just a blue army and a grey army. Histories based on GIS inferences are far underway. But they tend to have sketchy or no information on artifacts outside the major battlefields and the canonized historians have no time or money to generate artifact data.

But for profit scavengers do.

Getting persons like you and thousands of others turning up artifacts for profit and recording them would really fill in a major missing portion of the GIS picture of the US Civil WAR in ways too numerous to mention here.

Just a thought.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2021, 12:33:35 AM by SgtTowser »

He had decided none of it was true, except what he carried with him everyday.-—SgtTowser
No Life Club Posts: 2,612
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9223 on: May 07, 2021, 02:02:38 AM »
Cool find. Let us know if u find a maker’s mark. Have you ever metal detected a lesser US Civil War battlefield? I have always wondered if the lesser ones have been gone over?

The OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY has an online access to THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF THE WAR OF THE REBELLION (OR) that I used for Civil War research I did at one time. If you have not used the OR, it is a compilation of millions of Union and CSA war records completed around 1900 based on the decision of Union President Lincoln and Union General Halleck to use triplicate carbon paper for ALL communications by the Union government and its military. Lincoln and Halleck understood going in that the US WAR OF THE REBELLION could result in countless war time actions that could after the war lead to all manner of legal disputes and legal actions afterwards. Lincoln, the lawyer, wanted a paper trail that could either be used to defend his and the Union’s actions, or that could be altered/sanitized as need might later be.

Anyway, for 3/4s of a century at least the hard copy of the OR was so voluminous and so difficult to search that many war historians either only skimmed its surface, or ignored it entirely in writing even the most supposedly  “exhaustively researched” accounts of the US CIVIL WAR.

But then the internet came along and most if not all of the OR was scanned into an OR data base that can be searched to some degree by key words.

This is all a long preamble for giving you a metal detecting suggestion.

Obviously metal detecting a famous battlefield (e.g., Gettysburg, etc.) enshrined and preserved, as a national monument, would either not permit metal detecting, or where permitted, already long have been picked over by metal detectors.

But when One wades through the OR, one finds countless orders and memos from one officer to another  about tiny skirmishes, or raids, or temporary encampments, and these often report the route recently followed and the route that will next be taken. Often, the locations and routes are of utterly no consequence to Civil War historians writing mostly about big battles and about famous persons. But each of these locations, particularly sizable encampments stayed at for several days likely would have a debris/artifact    scatter that often would have been flooded, and lost to the eye in ensuing years, since armies then tended to encamp near water sources for themselves and their horses.

Likely foragers and scavengers trails along Sherman’s March to the sea have long been metal detected; same with the various approach paths to Gettysburg. But there were literally tens of thousands of encampments by both sides never mentioned in history books nor marked by battle monuments that metal detectors likely have not swept.

We need to know much more empirically about the US Civil War to understand what really happened during and shortly after that fateful time. I believe the future of our country lay in a much more empirically based understanding of the time. We have the incredible opportunity to converge  Geographic information systems with geology, topo maps,  mineral surveys, rail/Telegraph maps, farm land maps, battle maps, and artifact scatters to demythologize what both Union and CSA were fighting with, and over, and how they were expecting not only to win, but how they were expecting to benefit after victory. This convergence of information will eventually explain which elements of private oligarchy won and which lost, beyond the simplistic notion of Union and CSA. Both the Union and the CSA were constellations of foreign and domestic special interests; not just a blue army and a grey army. Histories based on GIS inferences are far underway. But they tend to have sketchy or no information on artifacts outside the major battlefields and the canonized historians have no time or money to generate artifact data.

But for profit scavengers do.

Getting persons like you and thousands of others turning up artifacts for profit and recording them would really fill in a major missing portion of the GIS picture of the US Civil WAR in ways too numerous to mention here.

Just a thought.

A fascinating thought, it is.  Really intriguing. 
No Life Club Posts: 1,123
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9224 on: May 07, 2021, 01:02:47 PM »
Used the magnifying glass on this scientist to identify a monogram on an old- maybe late 1800s era silver plate fork that I found metal detecting today at an old homestead.

Great use! Do you plan some restoration for this fork or prefer to keep it as is?

Dream. Wish. Leave nothing undone. Repeat.
No Life Club Posts: 1,123
What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9225 on: May 07, 2021, 01:06:27 PM »
Had a lovely dinner last night - both healthy and tasty.

Made a pretty strange salad with the main blade on a Work Champ first. I found the recipe by accident on a celery package and decided to give it a try - it’s a mix of obviously celery, raisins, almonds, apple, avocado, olive oil and lemon juice - tastes really great IMO.

No meat for me this time though - had to take some medical tests this morning, so doctor advised not to eat any

Afterwards opened a bottle of wine for my lady since I don’t drink alcohol and had a glass of surprisingly tasty dealcoholized wine


Dream. Wish. Leave nothing undone. Repeat.
No Life Club Posts: 1,809
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9226 on: May 07, 2021, 07:13:12 PM »
Used SwissChamp pliers to remove thorns from bike tire, the pen to mark the holes on the inner tube  , and the Phillips screwdriver to adjust a jumping gear.

Weasel
Just Bananas Posts: 75,882
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9227 on: May 07, 2021, 07:14:19 PM »
Great uses Alexanderre and Weasel  :like: :tu:

fail to prepare prepare to fail
Full Member Posts: 124
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9228 on: May 07, 2021, 10:12:05 PM »
I tried pruning the drink straw for my Yeti bottle with our kitchen shears.  Not a good idea.  Fortunately the sharp Huntsman cut it like a scalpel.

Jr. Member Posts: 79
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9229 on: May 07, 2021, 11:14:12 PM »
Cool find. Let us know if u find a maker’s mark. Have you ever metal detected a lesser US Civil War battlefield? I have always wondered if the lesser ones have been gone over?

The OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY has an online access to THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF THE WAR OF THE REBELLION (OR) that I used for Civil War research I did at one time. If you have not used the OR, it is a compilation of millions of Union and CSA war records completed around 1900 based on the decision of Union President Lincoln and Union General Halleck to use triplicate carbon paper for ALL communications by the Union government and its military. Lincoln and Halleck understood going in that the US WAR OF THE REBELLION could result in countless war time actions that could after the war lead to all manner of legal disputes and legal actions afterwards. Lincoln, the lawyer, wanted a paper trail that could either be used to defend his and the Union’s actions, or that could be altered/sanitized as need might later be.

Anyway, for 3/4s of a century at least the hard copy of the OR was so voluminous and so difficult to search that many war historians either only skimmed its surface, or ignored it entirely in writing even the most supposedly  “exhaustively researched” accounts of the US CIVIL WAR.

But then the internet came along and most if not all of the OR was scanned into an OR data base that can be searched to some degree by key words.

This is all a long preamble for giving you a metal detecting suggestion.

Obviously metal detecting a famous battlefield (e.g., Gettysburg, etc.) enshrined and preserved, as a national monument, would either not permit metal detecting, or where permitted, already long have been picked over by metal detectors.

But when One wades through the OR, one finds countless orders and memos from one officer to another  about tiny skirmishes, or raids, or temporary encampments, and these often report the route recently followed and the route that will next be taken. Often, the locations and routes are of utterly no consequence to Civil War historians writing mostly about big battles and about famous persons. But each of these locations, particularly sizable encampments stayed at for several days likely would have a debris/artifact    scatter that often would have been flooded, and lost to the eye in ensuing years, since armies then tended to encamp near water sources for themselves and their horses.

Likely foragers and scavengers trails along Sherman’s March to the sea have long been metal detected; same with the various approach paths to Gettysburg. But there were literally tens of thousands of encampments by both sides never mentioned in history books nor marked by battle monuments that metal detectors likely have not swept.

We need to know much more empirically about the US Civil War to understand what really happened during and shortly after that fateful time. I believe the future of our country lay in a much more empirically based understanding of the time. We have the incredible opportunity to converge  Geographic information systems with geology, topo maps,  mineral surveys, rail/Telegraph maps, farm land maps, battle maps, and artifact scatters to demythologize what both Union and CSA were fighting with, and over, and how they were expecting not only to win, but how they were expecting to benefit after victory. This convergence of information will eventually explain which elements of private oligarchy won and which lost, beyond the simplistic notion of Union and CSA. Both the Union and the CSA were constellations of foreign and domestic special interests; not just a blue army and a grey army. Histories based on GIS inferences are far underway. But they tend to have sketchy or no information on artifacts outside the major battlefields and the canonized historians have no time or money to generate artifact data.

But for profit scavengers do.

Getting persons like you and thousands of others turning up artifacts for profit and recording them would really fill in a major missing portion of the GIS picture of the US Civil WAR in ways too numerous to mention here.

Just a thought.
Wow very very interesting! Thank you so much for this information it is very helpful. I am mostly a gold and silver prospector in the west/southwest as well as the northeast. My main metal detector is the fisher gold bug 2 which is designed to find gold and silver nuggets- even tiny ones- but it works great for coins as well. A friend had asked me to detect their property with an old Homestead site on it. This fork was a very fun find. Among some other cool items- part of an old oil lamp, A string of silver bells and a few silver coins. I’ve only detected one day over there so hope to find more cool items.

I’ve also recently been researching old pirate encampments, old tavern sites etc. because of the 17th century Arabian silver coin that was found recently in Rhode Island- my home base. It was struck in 1693 in Yemen which was a very unusual find for this area.

Since then, other detectorists have unearthed 15 additional Arabian coins from the same era — 10 in Massachusetts, three in Rhode Island and two in Connecticut. Would definitely be the find of a lifetime to on earth one of those beauties!
 :cheers:
Jr. Member Posts: 79
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9230 on: May 07, 2021, 11:24:45 PM »
Great use! Do you plan some restoration for this fork or prefer to keep it as is?
keep it as is- Since it’s monogrammed and could be tied to the house that was once on the property i’m going to give this and some other items to the local historical society because then anyone interested in seeing relics like these will have access to them. It was definitely fun to wipe away the dirt and see this laying horizontally as if someone had just placed it there 3 inches down in the dirt.
Cheers
 :cheers:
Hero Member Posts: 769 Brick Bradford of multitool universe
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9231 on: May 08, 2021, 12:59:42 PM »
Tightening screws on 929:

So far I’ve been happy with my new PC revo., 1st real test and match not untill next week though. So we’ll see.

In any case, there are things that just did not exist on GP100 - no matter how many 1000s .357 mags I did run thru that nothing ever never got loose.
This one however seems to shake cylinder release, front sight and strain screws loose after few hundreds of shots.
So a bit more high maintenance and ’haps time to break out adhesssives.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

by this axe I rule
No Life Club Posts: 1,243 Hardwood sawyer, and follower of Jesus Christ
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9232 on: May 08, 2021, 02:02:22 PM »

So far I’ve been happy with my new PC revo., 1st real test and match not untill next week though. So we’ll see.


What is the brand and model?

This life is merely a staging ground for eternity. Are you preparing for the rest of forever?
Hero Member Posts: 769 Brick Bradford of multitool universe
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9233 on: May 08, 2021, 02:37:30 PM »
^
S&W 929 Performance Center


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

by this axe I rule
Sr. Member Posts: 338
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9234 on: May 09, 2021, 09:54:00 PM »
Last night at work

Just Bananas Posts: 75,882
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9235 on: May 10, 2021, 04:32:04 PM »
Great uses everyone  :like: :tu:

fail to prepare prepare to fail
Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 20,198

Nix us

********* * *
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9236 on: May 10, 2021, 08:22:18 PM »
Clipped my patient wrist band off, after leaving the hospital:






Then opened a package when I got home:



heterodox, not in the box
Hero Member Posts: 721 The SAK Also Rises
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9237 on: May 10, 2021, 11:06:59 PM »
Clipped my patient wrist band off, after leaving the hospital:


(Image removed from quote.)



Then opened a package when I got home:


(Image removed from quote.)

Congrats on hospital departure!

He had decided none of it was true, except what he carried with him everyday.-—SgtTowser
Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 20,198

Nix us

********* * *
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9238 on: May 11, 2021, 12:53:14 AM »
 :cheers:   

( If they really wanted me to stay, why'd they leave the service door unlocked....? )

heterodox, not in the box
Newbie Posts: 18
Re: What did you use your Sak on today?
« Reply #9239 on: May 11, 2021, 02:07:50 AM »
Used the magnifying glass on this scientist to identify a monogram on an old- maybe late 1800s era silver plate fork that I found metal detecting today at an old homestead.

Cool,,, I am a detectorist too and have been thinking that a SAK with magnifying glass would be handy for reading the dates on coins. Love it!!

Jason - N4RBZ- A Harley can get you through times of no money better than money can get you through times of no Harley____O~`o__

 

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