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Shop projects 32938

Point Of No Return Posts: 33,678 Plumbers Know Their Crap!!
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #570 on: November 30, 2020, 03:13:36 AM »
Niice!! Using the magnets was a clever idea, it must feel great and really comfortable!!
Thanks, yeah I must say that was a pretty good idea, and oh so good to just sit back in the most comfortable chair in the house and do whatever!
JR

"The-Mad-Plumbarian" The Punisher Of Pipes!!! JR
As I sit on my Crapper Throne in the Water Closet and explode in the Commode, I think with my Head, that my flush will always beat John’s or Jerry’s pair! But Jack’s ran for the Reading Room and tripped on a Can and bowed to the Porcelain God!
No Life Club Posts: 1,058

WWW 00

******
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #571 on: January 02, 2021, 11:07:18 PM »
After watching countless hours of putty knife restorations, I was ready to restore one myself. But after seeing the ridiculous shipping prices on eBay I decided that I would have to buy localy. It was settled, localy it was. But the putty knives I'd found were in no need of TLC. They were NOS (New Old Stock), and were a better buy than older beat up ones. In that moment I realised that I could make one myself!! But as usual it took me ages to gather the willingness to produce one. After watching a rehandling by YouTuber 357magdad, I knew that I could not waste more time. And so this journey began...

Reclaimed wood from a "cake stand" (no idea what they're called), parts were filled with bugs, used my Stanley nº4 to taper and clean up the sides. The tenon was cut with a chisel to fit a 15mm copper connector that was cut in half.


A better look at the tenon. A hole was drilled and a slot was cut with a hacksaw. The slot is then carved into the handle with a modified hacksaw blade.


An old saw blade is cut and shaped to form the blade of the putty knife. Later decided to add the taper you see marked with a sharpie marker.


Decided against the round shoulders and went for straight 90º. The tang was also filed a little more, enlarging the slot was more difficult than making the tang narrower.


Finished product with the copper "ferrule" in place. I reckon that I could use a reduction to get a little bit of a radius on the top of the ferrule.


Backside of the handle. I did not apply any finish as I may change my mind regarding the handle shape.


Sorry for the bad photos and the unnecessarily long windedness!
Global Moderator He Who Has The Most Nuts, Wins! Posts: 58,810
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #572 on: January 02, 2021, 11:26:43 PM »
Nice project and well done ! 
No Life Club Posts: 1,058

WWW 00

******
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #573 on: January 06, 2021, 06:19:12 PM »
Nice project and well done !

Thanks SteveC!! I was really fun and the results really surprised me!!
Global Moderator He Who Has The Most Nuts, Wins! Posts: 58,810
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #574 on: February 20, 2021, 08:27:40 PM »
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,204
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #575 on: June 07, 2021, 04:07:03 AM »
This would be a fun project

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4sDubB0-REg&ab_channel=SRHacksaw

Pretty cool. Btw hello Steve  :pok: :pok:
Although I would not have made it a flat bottom boat.

If I remember correctly, wait, what was I saying?
Global Moderator He Who Has The Most Nuts, Wins! Posts: 58,810
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #576 on: June 08, 2021, 01:19:23 AM »
Pretty cool. Btw hello Steve  :pok: :pok:
Although I would not have made it a flat bottom boat.


 :waving:
Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 21,846 Oxygen and magnesium toghether?! OMg!
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #577 on: September 20, 2021, 06:47:50 PM »

________________________________
It is just a matter of time before they add the word “Syndrome” after my last name.

I don't have OCD, I have OCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ.

Eff the ineffable, scrut the inscrutable.

IYCRTYSWTMTFOT

Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 8,617
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #578 on: September 20, 2021, 09:58:23 PM »
Although I would not have made it a flat bottom boat.

Flat-bottom hulls, they make the rockin' boats go 'round...



 ::)

No Life Club Posts: 1,679
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #579 on: December 15, 2021, 09:35:54 PM »
Due to some unfortunate purchasing of a TV walls setup we ended up with on made for buildings with a smaller distance between the joist in the wall. Thus it needs to be fastened to something than spans wide enough to hang it up. I thought that would be a nice little project to test a new toy I got some time ago on sale, and maybe add some pictures here in the process.

So I started with a leftover piece of 3mm steel sheet that happened to be suitable wide but too long. So it had to be cut, and I get to try my new toy.

1. So the new little toy is a, eh, something, that mounts on the angle grinder. It serves three purposes - gather dust via the vacuum coupling, having a straight edge to follow for straight cuts, and a cut depth setting. I try to avoid doing much inside that spreads dust in general, and metal dust in particular, so this is a nice little addition. It worked very well - very little escaped from that test cut.

2. After that I got to try another new addition, a small 125mm angle grinder, to just clean up all the edges and round the corners. Note the narrow grip compared to the other angle grinder - this one is very easy to grip.

3. The old steel sheet had a lot of character and rusty patina. It is to be spray painted later so at least the rust have to go. Some steel brushing does that just fine. 

4. This needs to hang on the wall so some holes will be needed. Some marking tools are good to locate those.


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"Simple is hard"
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
No Life Club Posts: 1,679
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #580 on: December 15, 2021, 09:41:21 PM »
Next is putting the actual TV hanger on and finding a sensible position for it.

5. The TV hanger.
6. Using a distance tool to place it 1cm from the top edge, and in the middle lengthwise.
7. When in the right spot make some marks for where the holes to secure this position should be.
8. Making some quick holes with a hydraulic punching tool.

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"Simple is hard"
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
No Life Club Posts: 1,679
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #581 on: December 15, 2021, 09:45:06 PM »
9. Holes made - going on the prepare for welding.
10. Removing paint and patina in the areas that will later be welded.
11. Cleaning up the same areas with acetone.

(An important note on acetone by the way is that is self-ignites quite easily - thus the paper or rag used need to be dispersed of safely in a fireproof bin or soaked in water.)

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"Simple is hard"
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
No Life Club Posts: 1,679
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #582 on: December 15, 2021, 09:49:28 PM »
I was going to do the actual welding too, but that hit a stumbling block. It is -12 degree Celsius in the workshop, and the welding machine refuse to cooperate at that temperature. So I've turned on some heat and hopefully the machine will warm up enough to finish this later.

"Simple is hard"
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
Global Moderator He Who Has The Most Nuts, Wins! Posts: 58,810
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #583 on: December 15, 2021, 09:58:07 PM »
 :like: :tu:
No Life Club Posts: 1,679
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #584 on: December 16, 2021, 12:51:12 AM »
After a few hours the workshop was warm enough for the welding machine to operate properly. So:

12. Preparing for welding. The screws and clamps hold the TV holder in the right position and contribute to minimize welding distortions.
13. Welding pretty much done. The edges of the TV holder was quite rounded so it took more heat than anticipated to get in those nooks. So some paint melted off here and there. No worries as long as it kept away from the actual weld areas.
14. Finished with welding and removed clamps and screws. Later on the welds will be cleaned up and the bottom area spray painted matte black similar to the rest.
15. Just a curiosity for those who haven't seen one: A welding stool. It can be tipped in three positions giving different sitting heights. Simple and great!

Hope someone found it remotely interesting :)

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"Simple is hard"
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 8,617
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #585 on: December 16, 2021, 03:54:42 AM »
Weld done!  :tu: 
Show content
:facepalm:

No Life Club Posts: 1,679
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #586 on: December 16, 2021, 08:11:01 AM »
By the power invested in me by heat, electrons, and the mighty Fronius, I declare the parts joined in lowly welding. (Until something do them part).

 :facepalm:

"Simple is hard"
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,508
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #587 on: December 16, 2021, 08:28:43 AM »
Good job :tu: And the welding chair is a good idea :like:

Sent fra min M2002J9G via Tapatalk

Point Of No Return Posts: 33,678 Plumbers Know Their Crap!!
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #588 on: December 16, 2021, 03:08:24 PM »
I so wish I could weld, I mean I can, I’ve done my share on cars, I like stick, but I just can’t now because of my seizures, I can’t be around the flashing lights! That one project I did from parts which was a recumbent trike from like 4 bikes all I used was nut and bolt, grinder and drill, that thing would have been soooo much better welded! Here’s a video the Mrs took when I was testing it out,,
JR

https://youtu.be/eL5SUIF9t2o

"The-Mad-Plumbarian" The Punisher Of Pipes!!! JR
As I sit on my Crapper Throne in the Water Closet and explode in the Commode, I think with my Head, that my flush will always beat John’s or Jerry’s pair! But Jack’s ran for the Reading Room and tripped on a Can and bowed to the Porcelain God!
No Life Club Posts: 1,679
Re: Shop projects
« Reply #589 on: December 16, 2021, 04:52:29 PM »
That cycle looks good. I can imagine how welding would make it easier though.

I have machines for a few different welding processes for metal and few of them flashes much as such. Dirty base materials/ rust/ paint and whatnot will misbehave but they shouldn't be in a good weld in the first place.

Stick welding - random flashes and sparks.
MIG welding - less random flashes and sparks, but still there.
TIG weldiing - no random flashes or sparks, a single continuous light with turn on and off and intensity under your control.
Gas welding - similar to TIG welding.
Resistance welding - literally done in a single flash in a fraction of a second. I usually just close my eyes and fire. (If the weld itself is covered you can't even see the flash).
(There are many others too, but I don't have those).
 
Then there is brazing as opposed to welding - the filler additive melts, but the base metals don't. The process has some advantages and disadvantages compared to welding. As a mad plumbarian you likely know it very well already. (I think some bikes are built like that rather than with welding?) Two options I find interesting is the option to braze using induction coils or high temperature ovens - the temperature makes the additive melt but not so high that the base materials get soft. (The base material can still have all kinds of reactions to being heated and cooled, but that might be for better and worse).

I'd like to try brazing with an oven or inductive coils, but so far I haven't had an excuse to spend time exploring - I imagine a sturdy setups and repeated failures will take more time and money than than justifiable for what I typically do.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2021, 05:02:04 PM by Vidar »

"Simple is hard"
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).

 

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