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Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?

comis · 27 · 5694

spam Offline comis

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Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
on: October 25, 2014, 06:56:00 AM
Hi, everyone.

I am new to this, and am just curious to see what everyone put on their wooden handle to keep it in good shape.  I have read from many sources that boiled linseed oil seems to be a popular method, but I have also read that some woodworkers don't think much of it.

Is there a particular kind of boiled linseed oil you'd prefer to use?  Will I be able find the common BLO (or your substitute) in popular chain in US?(Ace hardware, Home depot)


no Offline Grathr

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #1 on: October 25, 2014, 08:28:54 AM
In my experience
pure Linseed oil takes a very long time to dry. Check the label fir drying times before you buy.
I prefer a oil made for oiling hardwoood kitchen table tops that has a 4 hour dry time, I found in a hardware store. It penetrates deep and does not smell much after a couple of days.
But my experince is limited in this area.


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-Knívleysur maður er lívleysur maður.
 "A Knifeless man is a lifeless man" old Faroese proverb.


spam Offline comis

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #2 on: October 25, 2014, 09:15:43 AM
In my experience
pure Linseed oil takes a very long time to dry. Check the label fir drying times before you buy.
I prefer a oil made for oiling hardwoood kitchen table tops that has a 4 hour dry time, I found in a hardware store. It penetrates deep and does not smell much after a couple of days.
But my experince is limited in this area.


Sent from a device made from star dust using tapatalk

Grathr, thanks for the reply.

Do you have a brand name or generic product name for oil you use for kitchen table tops?  I heard various comments on linseed oil, and it does seem like boiled linseed oil(the modern version with all the addictives) do dry a little faster, but there is still smell and takes a while to dry depending on surroundings.  Some complain about the possibility of it may go rancid.  But for a layman like myself, I am wondering it probably may be the easiest thing to apply and manage. :think:


gb Offline Sparky415

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #3 on: October 25, 2014, 10:00:25 AM
I use BLO,
quote from wiki
Quote
      Today, "boiled linseed oil" refers to a combination of raw linseed oil and metallic dryers (catalysts to accelerate drying). 

I mix it 50/50 with white spirit this thins it out and helps it soak into the wood

In my experience
pure Linseed oil takes a very long time to dry. Check the label fir drying times before you buy.
I prefer a oil made for oiling hardwoood kitchen table tops that has a 4 hour dry time, I found in a hardware store. It penetrates deep and does not smell much after a couple of days.
But my experince is limited in this area.


Sent from a device made from star dust using tapatalk

Grathr, thanks for the reply.

Do you have a brand name or generic product name for oil you use for kitchen table tops?  I heard various comments on linseed oil, and it does seem like boiled linseed oil(the modern version with all the addictives) do dry a little faster, but there is still smell and takes a while to dry depending on surroundings.  Some complain about the possibility of it may go rancid.  But for a layman like myself, I am wondering it probably may be the easiest thing to apply and manage. :think:

It does smell but I really like the smell (the smell will wear off) but I don't believe it goes rancid
I often apply it just using my hands, the heat helps, but BLO will ruin your clothes! 

You should dispose of any waste rags carefully as they can Spontaneous combust  :ahhh

 
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nz Offline zoidberg

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #4 on: October 25, 2014, 12:17:47 PM
For the last few axe handles I've used raw linseed oil.
I don't rush so the dry times aren't an issue.
Apply a coat when you have the time and in a week or two or a month you'll have a nice finish.
If you don't want to get messy use a medical/latex type glove and apply in small amounts as needed.
And as sparky mentioned be careful with any rags etc.


us Offline ducttapetech

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #5 on: October 25, 2014, 01:12:31 PM
I have not had any problems with boided linseed oil. I does a alitte to dry, but that also depends on how thick you apply it. If you apply it lightly on the ax handle, it will dry rather fast. It does smell for a while, but I like the smell of it. Also, make sure you get the kind with the metallic dryiers in it. It drys a lot faster.
Just my 2 cents.



Nate

Nate

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no Offline Grathr

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #6 on: October 25, 2014, 03:13:56 PM

In my experience
pure Linseed oil takes a very long time to dry. Check the label fir drying times before you buy.
I prefer a oil made for oiling hardwoood kitchen table tops that has a 4 hour dry time, I found in a hardware store. It penetrates deep and does not smell much after a couple of days.
But my experince is limited in this area.


Sent from a device made from star dust using tapatalk

Grathr, thanks for the reply.

Do you have a brand name or generic product name for oil you use for kitchen table tops?  I heard various comments on linseed oil, and it does seem like boiled linseed oil(the modern version with all the addictives) do dry a little faster, but there is still smell and takes a while to dry depending on surroundings.  Some complain about the possibility of it may go rancid.  But for a layman like myself, I am wondering it probably may be the easiest thing to apply and manage. :think:

This is the oil I use:



Sent from a device made from star dust using tapatalk
-Knívleysur maður er lívleysur maður.
 "A Knifeless man is a lifeless man" old Faroese proverb.


spam Offline comis

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #7 on: October 25, 2014, 07:46:13 PM
I use BLO,
quote from wiki
Quote
      Today, "boiled linseed oil" refers to a combination of raw linseed oil and metallic dryers (catalysts to accelerate drying). 

I mix it 50/50 with white spirit this thins it out and helps it soak into the wood

In my experience
pure Linseed oil takes a very long time to dry. Check the label fir drying times before you buy.
I prefer a oil made for oiling hardwoood kitchen table tops that has a 4 hour dry time, I found in a hardware store. It penetrates deep and does not smell much after a couple of days.
But my experince is limited in this area.


Sent from a device made from star dust using tapatalk

Grathr, thanks for the reply.

Do you have a brand name or generic product name for oil you use for kitchen table tops?  I heard various comments on linseed oil, and it does seem like boiled linseed oil(the modern version with all the addictives) do dry a little faster, but there is still smell and takes a while to dry depending on surroundings.  Some complain about the possibility of it may go rancid.  But for a layman like myself, I am wondering it probably may be the easiest thing to apply and manage. :think:

It does smell but I really like the smell (the smell will wear off) but I don't believe it goes rancid
I often apply it just using my hands, the heat helps, but BLO will ruin your clothes! 

You should dispose of any waste rags carefully as they can Spontaneous combust  :ahhh

 

Thanks, Tony!  I knew you would chime in. :D  This tip will be quite helpful as I live in very humid environment, general humidity is 60-70%, and up to 80-90% during summer.  I will dump the rug into a bucket of water, after applying a small amount at a time to prevent  spontaneous combustion.   :ahhh

Other than penetration and faster drying, is there any side effect or drawback on mixing it with white spirit? 


spam Offline comis

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #8 on: October 25, 2014, 07:47:57 PM
For the last few axe handles I've used raw linseed oil.
I don't rush so the dry times aren't an issue.
Apply a coat when you have the time and in a week or two or a month you'll have a nice finish.
If you don't want to get messy use a medical/latex type glove and apply in small amounts as needed.
And as sparky mentioned be careful with any rags etc.

Zoidberg, I think I may follow Sparky's advice to mix it with something that will aid to dry.  My surrounding is way to humid, and at any rate, I won't want to want for weeks or even months for it to dry(just in case).  :pok:


spam Offline comis

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #9 on: October 25, 2014, 07:50:37 PM
I have not had any problems with boided linseed oil. I does a alitte to dry, but that also depends on how thick you apply it. If you apply it lightly on the ax handle, it will dry rather fast. It does smell for a while, but I like the smell of it. Also, make sure you get the kind with the metallic dryiers in it. It drys a lot faster.
Just my 2 cents.



Nate



Nate, I am trying to find ways to treat the Trail hawk handle.  I think it is a pretty neat product, but the little screw up top is doing a very bad job holding the hawk head loosely onto the handle.  So I gonna take everything apart, and follow some procedures on youtube to make it more usable and visually appealing.


spam Offline comis

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #10 on: October 25, 2014, 07:52:24 PM

This is the oil I use:
(Image removed from quote.)


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Grathr,

Thank you for making the effort to take the picture, I probably won't be able to get what you have in hand.  But if I ever bump into something similar or a store that may sell similar item, I will keep an eye out.  :tu:


spam Offline comis

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #11 on: October 25, 2014, 09:27:40 PM
I finally find some candidates in major brand-name chain store in US:

BOL in Home depot
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Klean-Strip-1-Qt-Boiled-Linseed-Oil-QLO45/202249497

Tung Oil in Ace hardware
http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=11884212

I did remember reading from various places that people also use Tung oil for handle finishing, and it has a lighter tone than using BOL.  I wonder anyone has used Tung oil in the past, and what's their comment on that?


nz Offline zoidberg

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #12 on: October 25, 2014, 11:53:05 PM
For the last few axe handles I've used raw linseed oil.
I don't rush so the dry times aren't an issue.
Apply a coat when you have the time and in a week or two or a month you'll have a nice finish.
If you don't want to get messy use a medical/latex type glove and apply in small amounts as needed.
And as sparky mentioned be careful with any rags etc.

Zoidberg, I think I may follow Sparky's advice to mix it with something that will aid to dry.  My surrounding is way to humid, and at any rate, I won't want to want for weeks or even months for it to dry(just in case).  :pok:

Sorry I wasn't very clear, it dries within 24hrs. I'll take many layers over time than a few done in a hurry. YMMV.


gb Offline Sparky415

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #13 on: October 26, 2014, 12:27:55 AM

Thanks, Tony!  I knew you would chime in. :D  This tip will be quite helpful as I live in very humid environment, general humidity is 60-70%, and up to 80-90% during summer.  I will dump the rug into a bucket of water, after applying a small amount at a time to prevent  spontaneous combustion.   :ahhh

Other than penetration and faster drying, is there any side effect or drawback on mixing it with white spirit?

The only drawback I can think of is it makes it very runny so it can be a little messy to apply
I often just use my fingers to to apply it, saves on rags  ;)

 :cheers:
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nz Offline Syncop8r

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #14 on: October 26, 2014, 12:28:44 AM
Isn't boiled linseed oil more for interior applications and raw linseed oil for exterior?

I have a bottle of raw linseed oil in my hand right now. Well actually not really as I'm typing with two fingers hands. It's an Australian brand called Diggers. There wouldn't be much difference between brands would there? I would think any generic linseed oil would be fine. I haven't used it yet - it's for oiling my cricket bat and a garden seat. On the label it says:

Product Use
 - Timber sealer and protector
 - Outdoor timber/fences/gazebos
 - Outdoor furniture oil
Directions For Use
 - Clean and dry surface
 - Mix 50-50 with Mineral Turpentine for increased timber protection.
 - Apply two coats with a brush, roller or spray gun
 - Clean excess oil with a clean lint-free cloth to avoid the surface drying sticky

(I can't stand soy and linseed flavoured bread; it reminds me of oiled cricket bats  :P )


nz Offline Syncop8r

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #15 on: October 26, 2014, 12:30:40 AM
I often just use my fingers to to apply it, saves on rags  ;)
Ahh, but then your fingers will spontaneously combust!


gb Offline Sparky415

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #16 on: October 26, 2014, 07:41:21 AM
I often just use my fingers to to apply it, saves on rags  ;)
Ahh, but then your fingers will spontaneously combust!

It wouldn't be the first time I've had something 'spontaneously combust'  :rofl:
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gb Offline Sparky415

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #17 on: August 16, 2017, 09:51:57 PM

Saw this today, just a reminder to us all  :whistle:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDPLFoWNlV8&t=0s
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nz Offline Syncop8r

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #18 on: August 16, 2017, 10:10:57 PM
I know of someone who was oiling tool handles with linseed oil and mustn't have disposed of the rags properly - her cottage burnt down and she lost EVERYTHING. So yes, it can happen (and the video suggests it WILL happen  :ahhh).

Also, to me a "shop" is a place where you buy things, unless it is a workshop....  ahh, cultural differences...


england Offline Kev D

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #19 on: August 16, 2017, 10:22:11 PM
Glad you posted that, I didn't know it could do that

Thank you  :tu:
« Last Edit: August 16, 2017, 10:24:30 PM by Kevin Davey »


gb Offline Sparky415

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #20 on: August 16, 2017, 10:24:23 PM
I know of someone who was oiling tool handles with linseed oil and mustn't have disposed of the rags properly - her cottage burnt down and she lost EVERYTHING. So yes, it can happen (and the video suggests it WILL happen  :ahhh).

Also, to me a "shop" is a place where you buy things, unless it is a workshop....  ahh, cultural differences...

I have taken the video as a good reminder as I don't always take enough care disposing of rags and paper waste  :twak:
I am seriously thinking about getting a metal waste bin with a lid for my garage or no bin at all so I remove my rubbish every day  :think: (but I know I won't  :-[ )

I have watched so many American you tubes I take it for granted now, Shop=Workshop

@Kev, It says on the back of the bottle  :tu: but I've never seen it proved before
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nz Offline Syncop8r

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #21 on: August 16, 2017, 10:27:07 PM
One thing I have thought of doing is using paper towels, then throw them on the fire when done.


england Offline Kev D

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #22 on: August 16, 2017, 10:27:50 PM
I know of someone who was oiling tool handles with linseed oil and mustn't have disposed of the rags properly - her cottage burnt down and she lost EVERYTHING. So yes, it can happen (and the video suggests it WILL happen  :ahhh).

Also, to me a "shop" is a place where you buy things, unless it is a workshop....  ahh, cultural differences...

I have taken the video as a good reminder as I don't always take enough care disposing of rags and paper waste  :twak:
I am seriously thinking about getting a metal waste bin with a lid for my garage or no bin at all so I remove my rubbish every day  :think: (but I know I won't  :-[ )

I have watched so many American you tubes I take it for granted now, Shop=Workshop

@Kev, It says on the back of the bottle  :tu: but I've never seen it proved before

I've got a bottle, but haven't read the destructions as I've never opened it. The axe Mark gave me will be it's first use

I'm sure I'd have read it fully before use  :whistle:


ca Offline jzmtl

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #23 on: September 01, 2017, 10:08:50 PM
Just stop using BLO. I used it for a few things, takes forever (months) to dry and can become sticky if conditions weren't right. Danish oil works much better and cure in a few days.


au Offline TazzieRob

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #24 on: September 05, 2017, 01:10:37 AM
I just used Raw Linseed Oil. It's what I had already, and doesn't have any heavy metals that the "boiled" oil does. It has been fine for my needs


gb Offline Sparky415

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #25 on: September 05, 2017, 06:39:22 AM

I put BLO on everything that doesn't move   :D
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us Offline ducttapetech

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Re: Boiled Linseed Oil for handle?
Reply #26 on: September 05, 2017, 01:14:44 PM

I put BLO on everything that doesn't move   :D
Same here. And on things that that stay in one spot for to long.
Nate

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