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SOG Episodes 7648

Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,449 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
SOG Episodes
« on: May 10, 2016, 01:07:09 AM »
A short intro is in order...

I am planning on doing something similar to what I did for Gerber, and that is to take plenty of photos of my SOG collection, do some research if possible, and post them in an episodic format. I know I am not finished with Gerber...as I have not included any of the Bear Grylls stuff...but that can wait for the future.

If nothing else, the photos can be enjoyed...


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Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2016, 01:34:04 AM »
Locking forward to it!
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Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2016, 01:43:29 AM »
:nanadance: :nanadance: :nanadance:

"Talent is God given. Be humble. Fame is man-given. Be grateful. Conceit is self-given. Be careful." -John Wooden
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,449 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2016, 02:02:04 AM »
SOG ToolClip.

SOG Specialty Knives was founded in 1986 by Spencer Frazer. He at first marketed a SOG Bowie based upon a model he saw used in Vietnam by special forces. From that humble beginning, SOG branched out into a lot more knives, but eventually also into multi-tools. I do not know much about the various SOG knives as I do not collect those. However, the multi-tools, I have a fair selection, the first we will be looking at is the ToolClip.

The SOG ToolClip was first introduced in 1991, making this a fairly ancient design. I believe it was also SOG's first multi-tool design, coming in after only 5 years of manufacturing knives. Because this is such an early design, these were produced by Seki, Japan, and thus, their quality is fairly high. I can easily say this design was replicated by other manufacturers for various cheap markets...and the build quality of those range from "I wouldn't be caught dead with one on me!" to "I just might use it if I was forced to!". No issues of quality on these SOG ToolClips however. They have a very solid feel and weight to them.

Of interest to the collector, there were 2 production generations. The first generation has "Pat Pend" stamped on the pocket clip.


The second generation has "U.S. PAT.#D 338,386" stamped on the pocket clip.


There are other differences in the tool selection between the generations, although the functionality of both versions remain almost the same.

In the following photo are the 3 examples I have in my collection. 2 are of the first generation, and 1 of the second generation.


I had a hard time finding the second production variation. I am unsure if they are rarer than the first, or if it just because I am in Canada, and the multi-tool market is very small up here.

So what exactly are the differences between the two generations other than what is stamped on the pocket clip?

The first generation has a large awl, and the serrated blade has a large flat screwdriver tip.

The second generation differs in that the large flat screwdriver now replaces the awl found in the first generation. This leaves the large serrated blade with no utility tip.

both versions have a pocket clip, a very nice blade with Seki Japan stamped on the tang, and a small flat driver, along with the serrated blade, and a variety of wire cutters and strippers.

In this photograph, the older generation ToolClip is located on top, with the second generation Toolclip located on the bottom.


There have been some mention of a slight colour variation of the pliers, ranging from a lighter gray to the darker gray seen on my examples. The jaws are blunt nosed and are well constructed. A very generously sized by-pass wire cutter was included in the design.


Whichever generation you find, the stamping is top notch.


A closer look at the tail end of the ToolClip illustrating the very nice pocket clip, handle retention strap, and construction design.


It is interesting to note that the ToolClip did not come with a sheath. It was SOG's first foray into the multi-tool market. The ToolClip was produced in Japan, as well as most of SOG's top end knives of the time, and it shows. The SOG ToolClip is an interesting piece of the multi-tool history. SOG did produce a smaller version, but it lacked the bullet proof build, the beautiful weight, and the sleek feel of the ToolClip. It does have an archaic design, but I think everyone should own or, or in the least, feel one in person. You just might become a convert and start craving old things.  :D



« Last Edit: May 10, 2016, 02:09:45 AM by Chako »

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Global Moderator He Who Has The Most Nuts, Wins! Posts: 58,989
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2016, 02:23:44 AM »
A short intro is in order...

I am planning on doing something similar to what I did for Gerber, and that is to take plenty of photos of my SOG collection, do some research if possible, and post them in an episodic format. I know I am not finished with Gerber...as I have not included any of the Bear Grylls stuff...but that can wait for the future.

If nothing else, the photos can be enjoyed...

I know I will enjoy the photos :gimme: I know even less about SOG MTs than Gerber :whistle: so anything you tell us in these episodes will def bring my knowledge level of SOG up  :D
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,449 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2016, 02:34:33 AM »
Having to do a bit of research on these, as I am no expert either. But the digging is the fun part about doing something like this anyhow.

As always, if I make an error, please correct me. I won't get insulted, I promise.  :D

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Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,449 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2016, 02:54:26 AM »
SOG Micro ToolClip (Original version).

Released about the same time as the SOG ToolClip, the Micro ToolClip came out in 1991. Shaped very much like its bigger brother, the Micro ToolClip is however made from plastic. With that said, it is still a solid tool produced by Seki Japan.

Unlike the full sized ToolClip, the Micro ToolClip came in 4 different colours. I only have a black and a yellow copy. However, there is also a green and a red.



The SOG Micro ToolClip are basically smaller versions of the larger ToolClip with one exception. The Micro ToolClips do not feature a separate smaller flat head driver seen on the larger ToolClip. There also does not appear to be different production variations, as all the Micro ToolClips I have seen only feature a combo file/flat driver/wire stripper tool, along with a serrated blade with wire cutter included at the base, and a knife blade with Seki Japan stamped on the tang.



The Micro ToolClip features either a nylon or hard plastic outer surface that sandwiches stainless steel dividers. The whole thing is very well built with no give or play. The materials used are very durable and top notch.

Here you can see the molded "Micro ToolClip" on the one side.


You can see the construction of the original Micro ToolClip.


The reverse side has a nylon/plastic pocket clip.


And the size comparison between the larger ToolClip and the smaller Micro ToolClip.


I have found the past that these were very difficult to source. The black being the most common version seen out in the wild. Even though there is some nylon/plastic in the construction, it does not make the tool feel cheap. The exterior has a nice texture that helps in gripping the tool, and I can tell you from experience, using this little tool in the cold would be boon compared to the larger all steel construction ToolClip. The pliers handle retention mechanism is surprisingly durable for not being metal construction.

Much like the ToolClip, you owe yourself to see one in person. There is a newer version out there produced in 2010, but that will be for another episode.

« Last Edit: May 10, 2016, 02:55:46 AM by Chako »

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Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,449 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2016, 03:52:51 AM »
SOG ParaTool.

SOG did not rest on its laurels, as they came out with a very intriguing design the following year based on a military need. Yes, 1992 was the year the world saw the ParaTool. Surprisingly enough, you can still buy a brand spanking new one from SOG today. I do believe this may be the longest running continuous production designed multi-tool in the world today. That is a 24 year production span folks.

What makes the ParaTool so unique is how the pliers are deployed. You can use them in any angle you desire based upon the design limitation of around 180 degrees. This allows you to reach things you just couldn't with other multi-tools. This does come at a cost however, and that is of stability. Because the pliers can bend, the handles tend to bend a little when in use. I have found myself having to secure the handles as they came lose while using the pliers at a weird angle. With that said, the ParaTool is the only multi-tool with this design feature, and in the right circumstances, it could be a life saver.

Two ParaTools getting ready for action. The pliers swing out of the body cavity via a small lever.


I have an older and newer Paratool. There are plenty of differences between them. The older version is on the left with the newer version on the right.


Looking on the backside, you get some ruler markings. Although the markings are identical, you can see how much crisper the stampings are on the older version.


The ParaTool has some nice circular cutouts of the handles. These not only aid in grip, but also allows water to exit, as well as cut down on some of the weight.


The markings on the edge of the handle is also another difference. The older version has "Pat Pend".


The newer version has "US Patent #5,267,366" stamped.


The differences do not just stop there however. The tool load-out of the older and newer versions are quite different. Old on the left, newer on the right. Likewise, note the difference in pliers base construction.


The older version's tool load-out.


The newer version's tool load-out.


Here is a detail of the handle cutouts to accommodate the folding pliers.


There are many different and subtle differnces between the older production copy (right) and the newer copy (left).


There are also a few items that are special to the ParaTool. For instance, there is a rare hard plastic sheath designed by Walter Wells (Blackie) Collins. Likewise, there is also a rare Yellowhorse custom ParaTool that comes in a presentation case.

Lets do a recap. The ParaTool has been in continuous production for 24 years and counting. It has a unique feature in how the pliers can be used bent, allowing some flexibility in plier usage. This does come at a cost however, of a somewhat fiddly handles that tend to fold up on you during use. However, this becomes less of an issue the more bent out the pliers are from the handles.

If you need to point out one design that has outlasted many other designs, the ParaTool has to be at the forefront of that discussion. It is unique, and because of that, it plays a niche role. I almost forgot, you can also replace broken tools, or even give it a custom tool load-out, making the ParaTool more flexible than just the unique pliers head design.





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No Life Club Posts: 2,297
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2016, 06:05:48 AM »
Thanks for taking the time for these chako. I really enjoy these episode threads

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Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2016, 12:43:20 PM »
 :tu:
Great pics and write-up as always. Thanks!

I am very interested in SOG multitools, but the seem to be a bit hard to acquire.
I would have a couple, but shipping costs are a bit much. For now...
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,449 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2016, 12:58:06 PM »
Jensen Maintenance Kit.

Here is something SOG related, because this Jensen Maintenance kit comes with a SOG Paratool.

http://www.jensentools.com/jensen-tools-1-854bk-multi-tool-kit-i-black-pouch/p/1-854bk

My copy has a nice white stitched Jensen logo on the flap of the belt sheath.


Looking inside, you can see that the kit comes with a SOG ParaTool, a Jensen 6 in 1 screwdriver, and a Mini Maglite. The sheath comes with 3 separate compartments designed to fit each tool snugly.


You can buy this kit with other multi-tools...but this one comes with the SOG ParaTool.


Of interest, the SOG ParaTool that came with the kit differs from my other 2 ParaTools in one detail. Yes, you can adjust this one using a hex key. In the following photograph, the oldest is on the top, the Jensen kit ParaTool is on the bottom.



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Global Moderator He Who Has The Most Nuts, Wins! Posts: 58,989
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2016, 02:38:24 PM »
The Paratool has always been one that has interested me most from SOG but I can never seem to win one :D
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Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #12 on: May 10, 2016, 03:57:13 PM »
Fantastic Chako! After today I'll have some time to really put some effort into the SOG section of the Multitool Encyclopedia, your info and insight is always super helpful and interesting. It couldn't have come at a more perfect time. Mind if I steal some of your pictures for the Encyclopedia?

Also, the reason the Jenson Paratool has Allen head screws instead of hex bolts is because when SOG moved most of their production to China, they switched all the pivots on their tools to the Allen head's. I believe the parts for the Paratool (and all their other multi's) are produced in China. however, final assembly of the Paratool, PowerLock2.0, PPP and possibly the PowerAssist occurs in the US. So the top two Paratools you have are 100% USA made, and the bottom one was only assembled here
« Last Edit: May 10, 2016, 04:06:34 PM by sLaughterMed »

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Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #13 on: May 10, 2016, 04:00:08 PM »
The Paratool has always been one that has interested me most from SOG but I can never seem to win one :D

I really need to get back to carrying my Paratool it is my favorite plier MT.  Also funny story I did actually win mine as a consultation prize. :D



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Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #14 on: May 11, 2016, 01:43:51 AM »
Great work,  again Chako
This will be my first stop here  at MTO while you are adding information
Thanks
« Last Edit: May 11, 2016, 01:45:29 AM by Marcellus »
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Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2016, 05:28:31 PM »
Loving this. Thanks, Chako

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Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #16 on: May 12, 2016, 03:57:20 AM »
Great thread!  Will be watching regularly!  Thanks for the effort.
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,449 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #17 on: May 13, 2016, 12:44:08 PM »
SOG SwitchPlier Family

The original SwitchPlier was first introduced back in 2000. With that came a tool that was fairly unique in design and functionality. That design was somewhat successful as they came out with a version 2.0 in 2015. To me, the SwitchPlier is an iconic SOG design. I am going to lump both the original SwitchPlier and SwitchPlier 2.0 together. I will also include a set of smaller clones if you will to this episode so that everything that is related will be together.

SOG SwitchPlier

The original SwitchPiier was unique when it first came out. It came in a sleek pocket friendly package. It had a neat gimick which proved rather useful and not at all that gimicky in the end. The SwitchPlier folded upon itself, and deployed, much like a switchblade, with a single press of the button.





A real conversation starter. In fact, the way the pliers pivot and deploy is a whole lot better and safer than what Gerber did with its Recoil. The Recoil has a super strong spring that propels the pliers straight out right quick. With the SwitchPlier, the spring is a lot weaker, but strong enough to pivot the pliers around smartly.

The design cues are stricktly SOG, including SOG's traditional holes in the handles. In the following photo, you can see how the pliers rest in the handle.



Once the button is pressed, the pliers rotate and lock in place. The mechanism also pushes the handles outwards and they lock in place as well. True one hand use.



Because of the design limitations, you only get one handle full of secondary tools. A half serrated knife blade, Phillips driver, a combo bottle opener and large flat head driver, a combo can opener and small flat head driver, and a good sized file are included. The top handle also features a metric and imperial ruler markings, albeit a short one.



One side of the upper handle has the patent number stamped on it.



On the reverse side, the model name. I really like the font and style used to mark this tool personally.



A closer look at the pliers and pivot point.



SOG styling.



When in the locked position, it is possible to pull away the top handle. This can happen when pocket carrying.



The locking mechanism on the SwitchPlier is one large lever.



SOG SwitchPlier 2.0

In 2015, SOG came out with a second version of their venerable SwitchPlier. SOG placed a lot of effort in keeping what was cool of the original whilst adding a lot of design cues that are classically SOG.

This time around, not only is the SwitchPlier 2.0 just as pocket friendly as the original, as it is very close in shape to the original, SOG also added a small pocket clip to the design, allowing more flexibility in carry.



Here you can see the cutout for the pliers. Version 2.0 didn't change much from the original.



SOG added quite a lot of design cues. For example, note the gear like shape that is strictly for decoration around the plier pivot. This mimics the gears used in their other multi-tools.



Unlike the original, SOG decided to use their piano-hinge locking mechanisms. I am still not sold on this being an improvement over a single large lever. I guess each tool now gets its own separate locking mechanism...but it adds to the fiddly factor quite a lot. Your own millage may vary.



SOG SwitchPlier 2.0 opens much like the original. That is a good thing as these tools have a high play-ability factor. You can spend some time just closing and opening these tools. The action is quick, smooth, and entertaining.



The newer version 2.0 offers the same functionality as the original plus an awl added to the mix.



A close up of some of the design cues. Also featured in this photograh is the opening and locking push button.



The pocket clip with the SOG logo.



Version 2.0 has a lot of SOG logos. They are all tastefully done however.



A close up of the piano-hinge locking mechanism.



SwitchPlier Clones

They say imitation is the most sincerest form of flattery. In the world of multi-tools, that is very much alive and well as most designs eventually get a copy or three. The SwtichPlier is no different.

As with most copies, the size differs from the original, and in this case, that is no exception. These are much smaller than the SOG Switchpliers.

I have 2 "The Fast and the Furious" advertisement copies which dates these to around 2001 when the film came out. The Stanley is a more recent production, and will be the version most seen out in the wild, although I am fairly certain production of this tool has now ceased. I have not been able to find one anywhere. Mind you, I do live in Canada, so keep that in mind.

what sets these apart, is their plastic sheath with a velcro back belt loop. The tool locks in place via a compression fit, but releases gently when sliding outwards to release the tool.



These are very high on the cute factor. The Switchplier has very nice classic lines. Shrink them and they just got a whole lot cuter.



The Fast and the Furious copies came in various colours. I have an orange and red. The logos are stylish cars in motion, as best as I can make out. They are rather abstract in design. The Stanley version is more direct and simple logo wise. Note the minor variation on the activation button between the two movie examples.



Look at that, mini Switchpliers.



These are very small. Their functionality is very limited. The jaws do not open very wide. The included tools, which differ from the SOG SwitchPliers, are also on the small side. Included are a small plain edge blade, a Phillips driver, a file, a small flat head driver, and a belt loop. Note also that the tools do not lock in place other than the pliers, which copied the SOG mechanism rather closely.



And a size comparison between the SwitchPlier Family, included the adopted children.  :D



Conclusion

The SOG switchPlier is rather unique in how it folds and deploys. It is a true conversation opener. I have also found that when you pull one out of your pocket and deploy the pliers, a few witnesses will be startled. The action is that smooth and fast.

I much like the uniqueness of the SwitchPlier design, and the sleek lines. It does have its issues in that the jaws are a little limited in opening distance. The secondary tools are also limited to the design. With that said, this tool is very high on the play scope. If you have one, you just might flick it open and closed repeatedly and may run the risk of wearing the tool out prematurely. Just saying.  :D
« Last Edit: May 13, 2016, 12:46:26 PM by Chako »

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Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,449 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #18 on: May 13, 2016, 04:27:50 PM »
sLaughterMed, thanks for that info. I didn't know that.

Everyone, thank you. I am going to add to this thread when I can.  :salute:

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Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,449 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #19 on: May 16, 2016, 07:19:57 PM »
SOG Pocket PowerPliers S44

I attempted to contact SOG in regards to some information, that was a little over a week ago, and no reply. I wanted to know when some of the SOG tools came out, as I noticed there was a lot of SOG information we just don't know.

What I can tell you, as best as can be guesstimated, the SOG Pocket PowerPliers came out sometime between 1996 and 1998.

There are several things that I like about the Pocket PowerPlier line. It is a very nice lightweight package to carry. SOG's website has it at 5.50 oz. The Pocket PowerPlier also features SOGs unique compound leverage system. With that said, what I really like about the Pocket PowerPlier is the shape and angle of the pliers. More on that later however.

When I first started collecting multi-tools back in 2009,  SOG had just switched over to covered plates on the compound leverage gears. I guess some folks got bits of themselves pinched in those gears. Therefore, only the newer SOG multi-tools have. With that said, I was a little surprised that those protective gears are not shown on the Pocket PowerPlier found here...

http://www.sogknives.com/type/multi-tools/pocket-powerplier.html

Maybe SOG only added the protective gears to their larger lineup as possibly the smaller Pocket PowerPlier's gears are too small to jam skin and other various body parts into the gears.

Here is the 2009 copy that I bought as soon as I decided to add SOG models to my collection.



Note the continuity of the SOG styling. In this case, those holes not only look good, they also aid in grip and water drainage.



Note that this copy does not have the gear protective covers.



Note that this copy has the same tool load-out as the newest version from SOG's website.



A close up of the gears.



And a closeup of what is stamped on the one side of the handle. The reverse side has the metric and Imperial ruler markings.



Note that this also has a lanyard loop attached to one of the bolts on the exterior of the handle.



And a side profile showing the pliers. I like how having the pliers angled in this fashion makes picking up fine objects that much easier from a flat surface.



Now contrast that to an older SOG Pocket PowerPlier.





There are a few variations out there for the collector to get all excited about. There are possibly more than I may know, but I can only show you the ones that I have currently.

TiNi Pocket PowerPlier
There is a TiNi version of the Pocket PowerPlier. TiNi stands for Titanium Nitride. It is a very hard scratch and rust resistant finish. SOG used a very attractive gold TiNi coating to separate these from the usual polished stainless steel versions. SOG also charged a premium for these, and they are difficult to find, at least up here in Canada.



Note also that the tool offering is a little different from the standard Pocket PowerPlier. The TiNi version
exchanges the file for a serrated sheepsfoot blade.



A closeup of the TiNi PowerPlier gears.



Yes, the TiNi still has that exterior lanyard loop attachment point.



Harley Davidson HD29
Another special variation is the Harley Davidson MotorTool HD29. This PocketPlier is covered with different markings, even down to the plier head forging.



Note the different style of file used.



The branding goes right down to the knife blade.



And the pliers.



The box and sheath that the Harley Davidson tools come in are quite different from the standard SOG white with black lettering. Here is an older thread in regards to this an its larger brother.

http://forum.multitool.org/index.php?topic=27093.0

Paladin Tools Power Play PT-510
Another variation is the Paladin PT-510. This model does feature the gear protective covers. Not only that, it is geared towards people who work in the IT field.



Some things to note. There is an included 110 punch down tool with a good assortment of wire strippers on it. The pliers are pointier than the average SOG Pocket PowerPlier, and are designed to allow an electrician/technician to use the pliers to punch through sheet rock.



A close up of the branding.





Also worth mentioning, there is also a Pocket PowerPlier Deluxe version which is now discontinued. The Deluxe version offers one extra tool, which is a 1/4" bit driver.



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Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,449 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #20 on: May 17, 2016, 12:01:59 AM »
SOG Micro ToolClip 2.0

Probably due to fan request, the Micro ToolClip found itself in a second version that came out in 2010. Oddly enough, there were many quality control issues from the first batch (mostly with how the bypass cutters meshed together if memory serves me right), and it was quickly found out that Tool Logic would be producing them under their own brand name. Tool Logic was freshly acquired by SOG at around the same time.

I was fortunate enough to get one of each colour with Multitool.org laser etched on them from this website. Now I hadn't followed the Tool Logic Micro ToolClip 2.0 saga since then. I am a bit surprised that I couldn't find a single photo except for what was published on this forum with Tool Logic's branding etched into the metal pocket clip. I was only able to dig up that the Micro ToolClip 2.0 was in the Tool Logic 2011 catalogue. As far as I am able to ascertain, it would appear that the Tool Logic Micro ToolClip 2.0 was short lived. Either way, SOG only produced the SOG branded ToolClip 2.0 in a short run making these somewhat of a collector item.

There are a number of differences between the version 2.0 and the original. Some of the major differences include a spring loaded pliers with a sliding lock mechanism, an all metal pocket clip, and the inclusion of a Phillips driver on the tip of the handle. I am happy to state I couldn't find any quality control issues on my examples.



The SOG Micro ToolClip 2.0 came in 4 different colours, black, blue, green, and pink.





Included is a file, bottle opener, and plain edged knife blade. Can't forget the exterior lanyard loop.



The old and the new.

« Last Edit: May 17, 2016, 12:03:56 AM by Chako »

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Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,449 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #21 on: May 17, 2016, 01:13:54 AM »
SOG PowerPlier

Introduced about the same time as the smaller Pocket PowerPlier (mid to late 90's), the larger PowerPliers I have found tend to be less common. You can still buy a Pocket PowerPlier, however, the larger PowerPlier is now discontinued.

I only have 3 examples of PowerPliers in my collection. First up is a standard black oxide PowerPlier.



Once again, those stylized SOG holes are evident on the PowerPlier.







Next up might be a TiNi PocketPlier Deluxe. I say Deluxe as it has one extra tool. Not exactly sure about its Deluxe status however.







My last is a Harley Davidston HD30 Deluxe Motortool.



Note the absence of SOG circular holes.















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Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #22 on: May 17, 2016, 11:58:50 PM »
These are awesome thanks for taking the time to post this.
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,449 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #23 on: May 18, 2016, 12:46:25 AM »
You are welcome. I just wished I knew more about SOG. Either way, the photos do not lie.  :D

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No Life Club Posts: 4,470 Apparently it is possible to have too many tools;)
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #24 on: May 18, 2016, 02:26:53 AM »
Chako,
Thank you for another of your very informative and useful threads "You da man !"   :salute:  :salute:  :salute:  :tu:

I just wished I knew more about SOG.

I can't help you with any dates, but I have a few other variants for your list:

SS Pocket PowerPliers were also relabelled for Stanley as the "MaxEdge", also for "Master Mechanic", and Penn International (the fishing equipment suppliers). Penn also sold a TiN version.

I also have a Penn branded SS CrossGrip, and a Master Mechanic branded SS Power Plier .
« Last Edit: May 18, 2016, 02:30:11 AM by gregozedobe »

babola: "Enjoy your tools and don't be afraid to air your opinion and feelings here, but do it in courteous and respectable way toward others, of course."
Global Moderator He Who Has The Most Nuts, Wins! Posts: 58,989
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #25 on: May 18, 2016, 04:41:12 AM »
You are welcome. I just wished I knew more about SOG. Either way, the photos do not lie.  :D

And nice photos you do take :D :tu: Thanks for this thread :cheers:
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,449 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #26 on: May 18, 2016, 05:25:27 AM »
SOG CrossGrip and CrossCut

After much digging, trying to find some date I could pin on the CrossCut and CrossGrip, I found this...

https://books.google.ca/books?id=Ov8DAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA25&lpg=PA25&dq=When+did+the+SOG+crosscut+come+out&source=bl&ots=9bCeD4hTIq&sig=bxmwDuWeLaw3ckDCbB6kd8XGYXE&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiMpIWyz-LMAhWm64MKHaG3DwU4ChDoAQhGMAc#v=onepage&q=When%20did%20the%20SOG%20crosscut%20come%20out&f=false

Boy's Life 1998, which is the earliest date I could find which mentioned the CrossCut. I figure both came out at the same time. Therefore, I am going to say both the CrossGrip and CrossCut came out in 1998, until we have an earlier date confirmed.

Either way, the CrossCut and CrossGrip are very nice pocket sized multi-tools designed to compete with the Leatherman Micra which first came out in 1996. I had originally thought SOG came out with these to compete with the similar concept of the Gerber Shortcut and Clutch (pair featuring a scissor and plier as their main function), but my thought on the matter were wrong considering the SOG offerings predate both by many years. In fact, the design predates the Gerber Eclipse, which was Gerber's first scissor based pocket multi-tool...which came out in 2003.

I have 5 examples of these in my collection. 3 SOG CrossGrips, and 2 SOG CrossCuts. Of the SOG CrossGrips, I have a USA made older one, and a newer CrossGrip 2.0 which is produced in China. The third is a TiNi coverd GrossGrip which is also of older production, and hence made in the USA. The SOG CrossCuts I have are both made in the USA, with one featuring a TiNi coating.



Both the SOG CrossGrip and SOG CrossCut are very easy to identify from each other. The CrossGrip features a distinctive external spring mechanism around the plier pivot point. This spring is visible on both sides.



Here is the older USA made CrossCut. The tool selection is interesting because you get a pair of attached metal tweezers, and a very unique little Phillips driver designed to fit only one of the cross grooves. The Pliers are of course, spring loaded.



The TiNi version is a real looker with the gold colouring. Note that the TiNi commanded a premium in pricing when new. The TiNi tools were made in smaller numbers, and because of this, they are harder to find, and getting harder as time rolls on. However, you can still source a Tini CrossGrip or CrossCut as they still occasionally appear on eBay.



A close up of those external springs on the TiNi coated SOG CrossGrip.



Yes, there is just something nice about having a TiNi Gold coloured SOG.



The SOG CrossCut differs from the SOG CrossGrip in several ways. The most obvious is the scissors that replace the pliers. Note the absence of the external spring mechanism on the CrossCut. Also note the presence of that attached tweezers, but also a fairly long white/clear plastic toothpick attached to the other handle.



And the TiNi coated CrossCut.



The scissors are also spring loaded, but with an internal spring mechanism. A close up of the Tini coated CrossCut's pivot point.



Note the presence of gears. Yes, both the CrossGrip and CrossCut feature SOG's compound leverage gears.



Looking down into the one handle. You can see the clear toothpick occupying center stage.



In the other handle, the metal tweezers are nested in the middle.



The gear end of the CrossCut.



The tail end of the CrossCut. Note the presence of a lanyard loop.



Both the SOG CrossCut and CrossGrip are very popular multi-tools. The older USA made models tend to be of higher quality. I bought the China made CrossGrip to see what the difference were, and they were almost identical, except for some minor cosmetic quality control issues that didn't detract from the tool overly much. I do believe both tools are now discontinued as I cannot find them on SOG's official website.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2016, 05:27:43 AM by Chako »

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Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,449 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #27 on: May 18, 2016, 05:53:07 AM »
gregozedobe, good information.  :tu:

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Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,449 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #28 on: May 18, 2016, 06:23:17 AM »
SOG PowerLock

First introduced back in 1998, the SOG PowerLock was their big guns for quite a few years. In fact, they are still being sold to this day. The PoweLock was also updated back in 2007 with a version 2.0. The newer version is easily identified from the older with the addition of gear protectors.

Here is my copy of an older version 1.0 Powerlock. Note the lack of gear covers.



Also note that there is only one single locking mechanism lever. The second version came out with piano hinge locking mechanisms. I am not a big fan of the piano hinge style. Yes, you can lock each individual tool separately, but at the cost of ease of use. Of interest, SOG listened to their customers, and the dreaded Piano hinge locking mechanism was soon abolished. Today, if you visit SOG's official website, you will note that current models feature an single piece locking lever.



All PowerLock models come with a set of removable tool covers. Although the covers are a pita as you have to open them each and every time you wish to deploy a tool, they also aid in making the tool more comfortable if you are putting a lot of weight in squeezing the handles. They are easy to take off if you can't live with them.



The SOG PowerLock line is SOG's large and full featured multi-tool family. Inside those handles are a large variety of fold out tools. SOG can cram quite a lot in there, as traditionally, their folding tools tend to be thinner than most of the competition.



Here you can see those tool covers in place. They provide a nice comfortable surface that interfaces with your palm.



The next example I have is of the SOG PowerLock TiNI.

Note that this is not an updated PowerLock, and as such, is pre 2007 in manufacture. I find it interesting that they didn't bother to Titanium Nitride coat the tool covers.



Love that single lever locking mechanism.







A close up of the gears.



And the tail end.



The next tool is one I bought new back in 2009. This is a SOG PowerLock EOD 2.0. Note the presence of gear covers.



Also note the presence of the piano hinge locking mechanism.



Still has the same tool covers.



This EOD version has the V-Cutter as well as the C4 spike.



A close up of those gear covers found on the updated PowerLocks.



A close up of the piano hinge locking mechanism found on the updated PowerLocks.



A close up of the compound leverage mechanism as well as the gear covers.



The other variation I have of the SOG PowerLock is the Paladin Tools PowerPlay PT-525.



A nice single lever locking mechanism.



Because the PT-525 is based on the PowerLock, you get tool covers.



Lots of special IT and electronic/electrician tools found here, which makes it quite different from the SOG Powerlocks.



A close up of the markings on the pliers.



A close up of the lever locking mechanism.



In conclusion, the SOG PowerLock offers a lot of functionality in a good sized package. The family comes with easy to remove tool covers that aid in plier comfort, but are a pain to open every time you want to use a fold out tool. That gold coloures TiNI is just gorgeous, and rust and scratch resistant to boot. The Paladin Tool is very different from SOGs usual fair.


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Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,449 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: SOG Episodes
« Reply #29 on: May 18, 2016, 01:07:19 PM »
SOG PowerAssist

First introduced in 2008, the SOG PowerAssist offered something rarely seen on a multi-tool, spring assist opening knife blades. SOG basically took their very popular PowerLock model, and changed one handle to house the spring mechanism to assist two knife blades. SOG calls this their "SOG Assisted Technology". What it really meant...you lost some functionality due to the spring housing. On the other hand...you also gained true one handed opening blades. Sorry for the bad pun.

All SOG PowerAssist come with the gear guards. I have yet to see one without.



In the following photo, you can see the tool cover on the right.



Unlike the SOG PowerLock which in the past, has specific model designations to denote the folding tool configuration, the PowerAssist comes in only one flavour. I may as well mention that you can have many SOGs in stainless or black oxide coating. The TiNi models came out a while back, and it doesn't appear to be something SOG is currently offering.



Yes, mine is an older copy with that dreaded piano hinge locking mechanism. The newer ones have the single one piece locking lever. Note that SOG removed those nice stylish holes for something with brand labeling.



Looking at the other handle, you can see the spring mechanism takes up a lot of space as it is hidden in that black housing. Both spring assisted blades are found on either side of the housing.



Here you can see the two step locking mechanism for the spring assisted blades. First, there is a nicely textured sliding locking mechanism that first needs to be pushed open. You close it to lock the whole mechanism down, thereby locking the spring assisted blades into the handles. Once that first lock is pushed open, simply pull up on that round button. This will push the blade out slightly. Once this is done, any slight upward pull on the thumb stud on the blade will kick in the spring, which will take over and open the blade the rest of the way rather quickly. To push the blade back into the handle, you have to reverse all the steps, including pushing down on the round button until the blade is seated home. You could say the sliding lever on the right of the round button locks the button down.



The SOG PowerAsssist come with gear covers/guards.



A closer look at one of the blade thumb studs.



There are a few different variations based on the SOG PowerAssist. Both of the ones I am aware of come from West Marine, a giant US retailer on all things boating. Hence, the two copies I have are water related.

The first is called the West Marine Sailing Tool. Before I go into any details, it is interesting to note that both of the West Marine branded tools do not feature SOG's proprietary "Assisted Technology". They are lacking the spring and housing, despite having the locking mechanism which remains functional.



My copy has the piano hinge locking levers. I am unaware if West Marine ever commissioned a newer version with the newer single piece locking lever. I do believe this sailing tool is now discontinued.



A closer look from one side of the tool. Note that the West Marine Sailing Tool comes with a very nice marlin spike and a half serrated sheepsfoot blade. Both are housed in the same handle, but lack the spring mechanism as mentioned before.



Here you can see the PowerLock side with its tool cover opened. The other handle features the same locking mechanism as the PowerAssist.



The tool specialization did not stop with the two large tools. Some thought went into specializing this tool for sailors.



A close up of the locking mechanism for the marlin spike and sheepsfoot blade,



Some more details of the West Marine Sailing Tool.





The second offering from West Marine is the BlackTip Fishing Tool. Unlike the above sailing tool which is the same size as the SOG PowerAssist, the BlackTip is larger. Larger to house a very long pair of pliers. The West Marine BlackTip's first batch had a recall. These rarer variations had replaceable carbide cutters. From what I have read, there was too much metal removed, weakening the pliers to the point of failure. The replacement did not feature these replaceable carbide cutters. I have the updated version.



As can be seen in this next photo.



Inside the non-assistive handle, you get a nice plain edge blade, along with a V cutter. The specialization did not stop there, as the other handle features a fish scaler with hook disgorger, and a fish hook sharpening groove on the file.



The stylized logo on the BlackTip.



The BlackTip features a special long pair of fishing needlenose pliers.



The SOG PowerAssist did not offer the variations of the PowerLock, although it appears that SOG is streamlining their model variation offerings, possibly because you can easily custom modify your tool with the addition of other tools that SOG has on offer. Either way, the PowerAsssist is unique in offering not one, but two spring assist opening blades. West Marine commissioned two models from SOG, but they removed the spring Assist possibly because SOG didn't wish to water down their Assisted Technology, either that or West Marine and/or SOG decided that for a salt water environment, the spring mechanism was too susceptible to issues or failure. Either way, the West Marine models are both now discontinued. The BlackTip is unique in being SOG's largest multi-tool ever produced.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2016, 01:08:24 PM by Chako »

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