Multitool.org
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
+-

Hello Lurker! Remove this ad and much more by logging in.


Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos 2460

Full Member Posts: 185
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #30 on: May 26, 2019, 05:49:15 PM »
I started dealing with this almost for fun by reading on the flashlight forum that many members had a BOB and similar preparations.
Then reading and reflecting, I decided that all this is not a waste of time and resources.

In my case I live in a nation that is seismic but where everyone tries to forget it ..

I've noticed that most people don't spend a penny on their safety.
Having a fire extinguisher at home or in the car, possessing a reliable flashlight, a rescue kit seems to be an alien thing.

I recently read an interesting book where the author says that most people react with denial when there is a problem (The Unthinkable: Who Survives when Disaster Strikes - Amanda Ripley)
This book is very interesting from the psychological point of view of the emergency.

I agree with the subject of climate change - some say overheating other cooling but one thing is certain weather phenomena become more extreme and it is good to spend time and money on preparation.
Be autonomous for a few days and don't assume that someone will immediately come to take care of you.
(Terrible translation with Google Translate)
Full Member Posts: 185
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #31 on: May 26, 2019, 05:51:59 PM »
I now live in very close proximity to Tsunami danger zone.         

Northern California / Lower Oregon near the coast?
That area is critical, you are right to be prepared
Wielder of the Bow of Banishment. Admin Team Point Of No Return Posts: 31,741 El Presidente del Fan Club Micky D
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #32 on: May 26, 2019, 06:35:40 PM »
The closest thing to this I do is a winter car kit.  Essentially a few bits and bobs for getting the car out of a snow drift (which I've had to do once) and, if that fails, a few things to make spending the night stuck in the car not so horrible. 

Try not to be the person who blunders around and causes everyone else to get out the way.  Everyone else thinks you're a utter...
Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 21,530
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #33 on: May 26, 2019, 08:34:46 PM »
Northern California / Lower Oregon near the coast?
That area is critical, you are right to be prepared

The California coast from the Bay Area to the Border of Mexico can be inundated by Tsunami waves.  Its not something I am terribly worried about however knowing what to do and where to evacuate to is part of my families preparedness. 

Esse Quam Videri
Thread Killer 2019 No Life Club Posts: 3,746
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #34 on: May 26, 2019, 09:01:55 PM »
I was a shelter manager for the Red Cross some years back and I was amazed at what people would show up to the shelter with.  Pots and dishes and your alarm clock are not the things that you really need to have with you when you evacuate.  This was for hurricanes when people knew they were coming for a week.  I understand that in some cases such as some of the wildfires in California you may get a knock on the door telling you that you have to leave in 15 minutes.  If you don't have a plan in advance you won't bring what is important, and that's why people brought pots and pans and dishes and their alarm clocks.
You want to know what to bring, here's a short list I came up with.

1.People and pets because everything else can be replaced.  Secure pets first so they don't get in the way of gathering everything else or so they don't hide or run away.  When I say secure I mean cage your small animals and leash your big dogs because the most obedient dog or cat may still run off amidst unfamiliar chaos.
2. Important and irreplaceable documents including everything from birth and death certificates, diplomas, licenses, insurance policies, credit card and banking information, and photos that can't be replaced. Also a thumb drive copy of everything that was on your computer so you can load it up on the new computer that your insurance company will buy for you after the emergency so you won't have to rebuild all of your files from scratch.
3. cash and valuables such as jewelry because in an emergency you may not be able to use cards for purchases or accommodation.
4. everything else including your 3 day bags of food and clothing and comfort items. Don't forget games, coloring and puzzle books and amusements for the kids and books, cards, etc., for the grown ups, because shelters are boring.

If you're not evacuating to a shelter you still need to have a plan in advance so you don't bring the useless junk that people grab when they are unprepared.  We do these exercises so we can formulate a plan and we won't panic. Is your bag a get home bag or a leave home bag? Is your leave home bag for going to a shelter or a going to the wilderness bag? Is your bag for a temporary event or is it for an event where you're never coming back. Do you have your towel? It's very important to always know where your towel is. :ahhh :ahhh :ahhh
« Last Edit: May 26, 2019, 09:07:19 PM by Alan K. »
Wielder of the Bow of Banishment. Admin Team Point Of No Return Posts: 31,741 El Presidente del Fan Club Micky D
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #35 on: May 26, 2019, 11:02:49 PM »
I was a shelter manager for the Red Cross some years back and I was amazed at what people would show up to the shelter with.  Pots and dishes and your alarm clock are not the things that you really need to have with you when you evacuate.  This was for hurricanes when people knew they were coming for a week.  I understand that in some cases such as some of the wildfires in California you may get a knock on the door telling you that you have to leave in 15 minutes.  If you don't have a plan in advance you won't bring what is important, and that's why people brought pots and pans and dishes and their alarm clocks.
You want to know what to bring, here's a short list I came up with.

1.People and pets because everything else can be replaced.  Secure pets first so they don't get in the way of gathering everything else or so they don't hide or run away.  When I say secure I mean cage your small animals and leash your big dogs because the most obedient dog or cat may still run off amidst unfamiliar chaos.
2. Important and irreplaceable documents including everything from birth and death certificates, diplomas, licenses, insurance policies, credit card and banking information, and photos that can't be replaced. Also a thumb drive copy of everything that was on your computer so you can load it up on the new computer that your insurance company will buy for you after the emergency so you won't have to rebuild all of your files from scratch.
3. cash and valuables such as jewelry because in an emergency you may not be able to use cards for purchases or accommodation.
4. everything else including your 3 day bags of food and clothing and comfort items. Don't forget games, coloring and puzzle books and amusements for the kids and books, cards, etc., for the grown ups, because shelters are boring.

If you're not evacuating to a shelter you still need to have a plan in advance so you don't bring the useless junk that people grab when they are unprepared.  We do these exercises so we can formulate a plan and we won't panic. Is your bag a get home bag or a leave home bag? Is your leave home bag for going to a shelter or a going to the wilderness bag? Is your bag for a temporary event or is it for an event where you're never coming back. Do you have your towel? It's very important to always know where your towel is. :ahhh :ahhh :ahhh

Excellent advice Alan.  You are definitely one hoopy frood.  8)

Try not to be the person who blunders around and causes everyone else to get out the way.  Everyone else thinks you're a utter...
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,879
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #36 on: May 27, 2019, 06:17:21 AM »
I started dealing with this almost for fun by reading on the flashlight forum that many members had a BOB and similar preparations.
Then reading and reflecting, I decided that all this is not a waste of time and resources.

In my case I live in a nation that is seismic but where everyone tries to forget it ..

I've noticed that most people don't spend a penny on their safety.
Having a fire extinguisher at home or in the car, possessing a reliable flashlight, a rescue kit seems to be an alien thing.

I recently read an interesting book where the author says that most people react with denial when there is a problem (The Unthinkable: Who Survives when Disaster Strikes - Amanda Ripley)
This book is very interesting from the psychological point of view of the emergency.

I agree with the subject of climate change - some say overheating other cooling but one thing is certain weather phenomena become more extreme and it is good to spend time and money on preparation.
Be autonomous for a few days and don't assume that someone will immediately come to take care of you.
(Terrible translation with Google Translate)

I think denial does happen, and it is hard to expect people always know what to do(that's including myself).  I remembered there was a mild earthquake once, and while I jumped out of my laziness and couch, I saw my gf looking wild eyes and dumb founded in the middle of the living.  Only after I pulled her around, did she snap out of it.  Luckily nothing did happen and t was comical to think about afterwards, but still, not all things always go as planned.



The closest thing to this I do is a winter car kit.  Essentially a few bits and bobs for getting the car out of a snow drift (which I've had to do once) and, if that fails, a few things to make spending the night stuck in the car not so horrible. 
I think a winder car kit is an absolute essential, especially if you do need to commute long distance or go rural places often.

Whenever talked about winter driving emergency, I always thought about the story about Mr. James Kim.  It's a classic survival decision and preparedness(or lack of) story, while I felt quite sorry for their lost, certain level of preparedness might have prevent the loss.

Follow us on MTO Unleashed Challenge this month!
Free Magnets! Nessmuk Challenge in Sept
Comis Gear Youtube Channel
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,879
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #37 on: May 27, 2019, 06:22:13 AM »
The California coast from the Bay Area to the Border of Mexico can be inundated by Tsunami waves.  Its not something I am terribly worried about however knowing what to do and where to evacuate to is part of my families preparedness. 
:tu:




Excellent advice Alan.  You are definitely one hoopy frood.  8)
:iagree:  Alan, thank you for sharing!  The advice about Pets is golden!


I know this may not directly linked to urban preparedness/emergency back, but for 'backup' purpose, I strictly follow the rule of 3-2-1 for all my digital data(some including personal/business data), where I have 3 digital copies, with 2 different media and 1 copy off-site.  And on a reminder card, I do have my portal harddisk as one of the item to grab before leaving.

Follow us on MTO Unleashed Challenge this month!
Free Magnets! Nessmuk Challenge in Sept
Comis Gear Youtube Channel
Thread Killer 2019 No Life Club Posts: 3,746
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #38 on: May 27, 2019, 08:10:42 AM »
:tu:



 :iagree:  Alan, thank you for sharing!  The advice about Pets is golden!


I know this may not directly linked to urban preparedness/emergency back, but for 'backup' purpose, I strictly follow the rule of 3-2-1 for all my digital data(some including personal/business data), where I have 3 digital copies, with 2 different media and 1 copy off-site.  And on a reminder card, I do have my portal harddisk as one of the item to grab before leaving.
People have their whole lives on line these days and yet they don't even think about what to do about the computer in an emergency.  If you have a big desktop model like I do with all the cables and everything attached it is not portable so it will be left behind. I copy my hard drive monthly. Good for you for backing up your computer and having an evacuation plan.  :tu:
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,879
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #39 on: May 27, 2019, 12:43:56 PM »
People have their whole lives on line these days and yet they don't even think about what to do about the computer in an emergency.  If you have a big desktop model like I do with all the cables and everything attached it is not portable so it will be left behind. I copy my hard drive monthly. Good for you for backing up your computer and having an evacuation plan.  :tu:

I had my computers crashed on me with the 'screen of death' too many times, and I learned that if there is anything valuable at all, just put it on a portable hard disk, so it won't crashed with the system.

And as I learned more about hard disk life span, they too were like people, but just much shorter life span(average 3-5 years).  So that's when I realize the importance of the 3-2-1 back plan.

Follow us on MTO Unleashed Challenge this month!
Free Magnets! Nessmuk Challenge in Sept
Comis Gear Youtube Channel
No Life Club Posts: 3,974
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #40 on: May 27, 2019, 10:25:18 PM »
The alternative (depending on what you do for a living, I suppose) - is just don't care :D

There's nothing on a personal computer I can't readily live without.

And, I suspect, aside from a couple of professions, this is likely a lot more true for many people than they might be willing to admit/accept at first.

No Life Club Posts: 2,279 Yersinia Pestis & Campylobacter Jejuni!
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #41 on: May 28, 2019, 01:29:18 AM »
"Failing to prepare is preparing to fail".
My main place to be in case of a natural disaster like floodings or major storms with power outages, is my own place, where I have everything I may possibly need, with a door I can lock and shutters I can close to keep unwanted things out. I specifically chose not to live on a ground floor, instead I am on the top of a 3 floor building. I can ride out any emergency situation for a couple of days to a whole week without any extra prep, that is water, food, a campstove to cook, and a large powerbank to keep the phone running and flashlights charged. If I am at work, I usually have a bag with a water bottle, some cookies and candy, some band-aids and tissues, a flashlight, multi, and a knife. And in my car trunk is an extra liter of of drink water. That's all I need to get back home.
As for bugging out, we had an earthquake a few years ago in the Mediterranean sea, a 6, and besides some very old buildings, most modern buildings stayed unharmed. So unless there is a very large one that will flatten everything, I am quite sure my building will keep on standing, and bugging out is not something I consider doing, less it's in a hotel in a holiday destination. Plus it's better to stick with a close community with people that posses various skills then to head out alone to a remote area, cut off from resources and with just your own skills.
I do understand some of these survival gear hoarders that seem to have everything but the kitchen sink stuffed in various bags for emergencies. I't a hobby like any other one, and some of these things may even come in handy when the smurf hits the fan. Also, such scenarios are the perfect excuse to get a few large outdoor knives.
From a practical daily life perspective, carrying all that gear some youtubers show off - We all have seen these dudes unload their packs, with 5 knives, 3 multitools, 2 kubotan, 3 tactical pens, 2 lighters, matches, and 4 more methods to make fire, a gun and 5 spare mags, plus food and water for a week and spare socks - looks a bit overkill to me.  :pok:

Once you go black you never go back
@blackdiamonds_42
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,879
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #42 on: May 28, 2019, 01:37:39 PM »
The alternative (depending on what you do for a living, I suppose) - is just don't care :D

There's nothing on a personal computer I can't readily live without.

And, I suspect, aside from a couple of professions, this is likely a lot more true for many people than they might be willing to admit/accept at first.

I don't know whether I can live or live-without the computer per se, but so many family and personal memories, mainly photo, are digitally stored on the computer/hard disk, it will be a shame not to preserve them best way I could.



"Failing to prepare is preparing to fail".
My main place to be in case of a natural disaster like floodings or major storms with power outages, is my own place, where I have everything I may possibly need, with a door I can lock and shutters I can close to keep unwanted things out. I specifically chose not to live on a ground floor, instead I am on the top of a 3 floor building. I can ride out any emergency situation for a couple of days to a whole week without any extra prep, that is water, food, a campstove to cook, and a large powerbank to keep the phone running and flashlights charged. If I am at work, I usually have a bag with a water bottle, some cookies and candy, some band-aids and tissues, a flashlight, multi, and a knife. And in my car trunk is an extra liter of of drink water. That's all I need to get back home.
As for bugging out, we had an earthquake a few years ago in the Mediterranean sea, a 6, and besides some very old buildings, most modern buildings stayed unharmed. So unless there is a very large one that will flatten everything, I am quite sure my building will keep on standing, and bugging out is not something I consider doing, less it's in a hotel in a holiday destination. Plus it's better to stick with a close community with people that posses various skills then to head out alone to a remote area, cut off from resources and with just your own skills.
I do understand some of these survival gear hoarders that seem to have everything but the kitchen sink stuffed in various bags for emergencies. I't a hobby like any other one, and some of these things may even come in handy when the smurf hits the fan. Also, such scenarios are the perfect excuse to get a few large outdoor knives.
From a practical daily life perspective, carrying all that gear some youtubers show off - We all have seen these dudes unload their packs, with 5 knives, 3 multitools, 2 kubotan, 3 tactical pens, 2 lighters, matches, and 4 more methods to make fire, a gun and 5 spare mags, plus food and water for a week and spare socks - looks a bit overkill to me.  :pok:

It sounds pretty sensible what you have, and I too find the blurring of urban/wilderness survival kinda amusing from all the youtube videos.  Personally, I will separate the absolute necessary gears for 'survival' vs 'wellness' and plan accordingly.  For example, if I were to escape a from a high rise building in an urban environment, my videos game/laptop may be a really thing to have, if I were to stay with friends/relative places, but it for sure is not for 'survival'.  On the other hand, flashlight/smoke mask/google etc could come in handy for the escape.

Follow us on MTO Unleashed Challenge this month!
Free Magnets! Nessmuk Challenge in Sept
Comis Gear Youtube Channel
Full Member Posts: 185
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #43 on: May 28, 2019, 03:15:33 PM »
From a practical daily life perspective, carrying all that gear some youtubers show off - We all have seen these dudes unload their packs, with 5 knives, 3 multitools, 2 kubotan, 3 tactical pens, 2 lighters, matches, and 4 more methods to make fire, a gun and 5 spare mags, plus food and water for a week and spare socks - looks a bit overkill to me.  :pok:

I agree with you.
We are not all supermen capable of carrying a backpack of 30 or 40 kilos for miles.
Better to have a few essential but good things and be able to move easily.

I have back problems myself and my backpacks are small / medium sized, they contain only the bare minimum.
If I had to evacuate my house (walking) all the rest of the equipment would be lost, I thought maybe I could load a suitcase on a trolley like the one of the storekeepers :-D
Newbie Posts: 29
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #44 on: August 20, 2019, 08:23:41 PM »
Howabout, you are a long walk away from home. It is night. You have lost your housekeys. You cannot get inside your house without scaling a fence, smashing a window/door. etc

Off the top of my head a full list of equipment that COULD cover any member's own domestic situation could be.

Phone
Credit Card
Cash
Torch
Lockpicks
Gloves
Saw, hammer, screwdrivers, glass cutter
Socket set
Cordless Drill
Crowbar
Sledgehammer
Chainsaw
Ladder

I think it depends on each person's situation which of the above would be most useful. But some choices would be problematic in themselves. :D
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,879
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #45 on: August 26, 2019, 09:21:23 AM »
Howabout, you are a long walk away from home. It is night. You have lost your housekeys. You cannot get inside your house without scaling a fence, smashing a window/door. etc

Off the top of my head a full list of equipment that COULD cover any member's own domestic situation could be.

Phone
Credit Card
Cash
Torch
Lockpicks
Gloves
Saw, hammer, screwdrivers, glass cutter
Socket set
Cordless Drill
Crowbar
Sledgehammer
Chainsaw
Ladder

I think it depends on each person's situation which of the above would be most useful. But some choices would be problematic in themselves. :D

Errr...would you carry all those gears for the so-called "bug-out-bag" or "get-home-bag"? 

Under what circumstance do you need to sledgehammer/chainsaw your way into/out of your own home? :think:

Follow us on MTO Unleashed Challenge this month!
Free Magnets! Nessmuk Challenge in Sept
Comis Gear Youtube Channel
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 13,948
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #46 on: August 26, 2019, 10:10:15 AM »
I connected my garage door to the alarm system, which allows me to open it with my alarm system app.

So I can lose my keys or my phone and still get in my house without damage.

If I lost my keys AND the power is out, I would have another issue.

Maybe I should put a keysafe in the garden shed (which is under alarm too) so I would only have to damage the shed instead of my actual home.

Regarding bugging out:
Not an option here.

This country is filled with buildings and remote areas are near non existant (at least not the size of area where you'd be on your own)

So I too tend to be able to bug in and use the place I know best as my shelter.

A minor adjustment I could make in that regard is to build a strong lockable door in the last section of the basement as some sort of shelter/panic room.

Buy now or regret later
No Life Club Posts: 2,254
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #47 on: August 26, 2019, 10:46:17 AM »
Also living in a high rise densely populated area but with the addition of having had to bug out for real with family, on foot, due to forest fires and having sat in the bomb shelters as the rockets flew overhead, I agree with you that most of this stuff is just fantasy.  The GHB is one of the ones which puzzles me the most also. I remember seeing a packing list for a GHB which included 100ft of paracord. I could begin to imagine why on earth that would be necessary to get home unless you're doing it batman style? I keep a camping bag in the car, it's kitted out for camping or an overnight bike trip but can equally answer for sleeping and eating in the office or in a shelter. It's not a bug out bag because this country is far too small and isolated for there to be anywhere to 'bug out' to realistically in the manner of the lone ranger youtube personalities.

For a long time I've believed that the correct models for planning for a SHTF/apocalypse style event is to study what happened in large populations during realistic similar events from history. Europe can provide a vast wealth of well documented historical data of this kind over hundreds of years, population centres hit by major strife. The very first thing which I learnt was that man is a pack animal. Survival is in numbers, mankind works best in groups. Direct opposite to the fantasies peddled on youtube and that's just a beginning of it.

"It is better to lose health like a spendthrift than to waste it like a miser." - Robert Louis Stevenson
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,879
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #48 on: August 26, 2019, 11:44:56 AM »
I connected my garage door to the alarm system, which allows me to open it with my alarm system app.

So I can lose my keys or my phone and still get in my house without damage.

If I lost my keys AND the power is out, I would have another issue.

Maybe I should put a keysafe in the garden shed (which is under alarm too) so I would only have to damage the shed instead of my actual home.

Regarding bugging out:
Not an option here.

This country is filled with buildings and remote areas are near non existant (at least not the size of area where you'd be on your own)

So I too tend to be able to bug in and use the place I know best as my shelter.

A minor adjustment I could make in that regard is to build a strong lockable door in the last section of the basement as some sort of shelter/panic room.

That's a good alternative option to just solely relying on home key.  :tu:

Follow us on MTO Unleashed Challenge this month!
Free Magnets! Nessmuk Challenge in Sept
Comis Gear Youtube Channel
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,879
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #49 on: August 26, 2019, 11:50:27 AM »
Also living in a high rise densely populated area but with the addition of having had to bug out for real with family, on foot, due to forest fires and having sat in the bomb shelters as the rockets flew overhead, I agree with you that most of this stuff is just fantasy.  The GHB is one of the ones which puzzles me the most also. I remember seeing a packing list for a GHB which included 100ft of paracord. I could begin to imagine why on earth that would be necessary to get home unless you're doing it batman style? I keep a camping bag in the car, it's kitted out for camping or an overnight bike trip but can equally answer for sleeping and eating in the office or in a shelter. It's not a bug out bag because this country is far too small and isolated for there to be anywhere to 'bug out' to realistically in the manner of the lone ranger youtube personalities.

For a long time I've believed that the correct models for planning for a SHTF/apocalypse style event is to study what happened in large populations during realistic similar events from history. Europe can provide a vast wealth of well documented historical data of this kind over hundreds of years, population centres hit by major strife. The very first thing which I learnt was that man is a pack animal. Survival is in numbers, mankind works best in groups. Direct opposite to the fantasies peddled on youtube and that's just a beginning of it.

As you know, I definitely share the same sentiment towards strange gears people put in GHB...and I wonder what good does that even do for those youtube personalities, for sure, I won't want to subscribe to their channel if they are just making videos for the sake of making them.

Apocalypse is a little too far from me, and I totally agree with the assessment that human are pack animal.  And instead of imagining how to survive in the world 'walking dead' style, I would much rather to take time to establish protocols/methods how family and friends work together to overcome certain adversity.

Follow us on MTO Unleashed Challenge this month!
Free Magnets! Nessmuk Challenge in Sept
Comis Gear Youtube Channel
Hero Member Posts: 910 Did you know Uranus has 22 moons?!?
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #50 on: August 29, 2019, 03:37:44 AM »
I call mine the "Bag 'o' Stuff' and here are the contents:

1. Knife - a high quality Pakistan knife I found at a gas station
2. Pez dispenser filled with Xanax so I don't panic
3. 551 cord - it is a wee bit stronger than regular 550 cord
4. Cat treats - so I can bribe my way into any cat-lady house in the country
5. G string - for my guitar
6. Glow in the dark bobble-head from a Frankenberry box - to cut through the darkest night
7. 2 sticks - for starting fires
8. Odd Job's hat - for hunting game
9. Water de-purifier tablets - so I can mess up everyone else's water...making my water more valuable
10. Viewmaster - To keep myself entertained and keep morale high

All of these items are packed in a double lined plastic Walmart bag.

Rather mundane quote entered here to approximate humor.
Hero Member Posts: 956
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #51 on: August 29, 2019, 04:15:36 AM »
Not quit a BOB but I have a friend who lives in the countryside who keeps in the boot of his car,

A sleeping bag
A couple of 5l bottles of water
A huge can of breakfast in a can, basically beans with sausage, egg and bacon in a huge can.
A can opener, metal bowl, cup and spoon.

This is incase he breaks down, gets stuck in heavy snow.




My trouble is i never show initiative, but that's only because no one has told me to.
No Life Club Posts: 1,430
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #52 on: August 29, 2019, 04:00:57 PM »
Not quit a BOB but I have a friend who lives in the countryside who keeps in the boot of his car,

A sleeping bag
A couple of 5l bottles of water
A huge can of breakfast in a can, basically beans with sausage, egg and bacon in a huge can.
A can opener, metal bowl, cup and spoon.

This is incase he breaks down, gets stuck in heavy snow.

I always wondered about storing food and water in a car. Water in plastic containers probably gets a lot of bad chemicals from the plastic when hot and might freeze in the winter which means either that you can't drink it or you have a wet/frozen car. I presume food gets spoiled if repeatedly heated to 60C despite it being canned?

 :think:

There is no magic therefore gadgets!
No Life Club Posts: 3,974
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #53 on: August 29, 2019, 11:54:48 PM »
Just this week I found myself 4 hours from home - cold, dark, and hungry.

Now, I was not so far from civilisation that I was in danger for my life, but also I wasn't inclined to cough up ~$200 for room and food....

A cheeky sleeping bag and some snacks would have been just the thing to make an overnight rest quite desirable....


(as it was, I just shotgunned a redbull and drove home, because that's how I roll, and I apparently I have a devil-may-care attitude toward operating heavy vehicles while fatigued....)



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KER45xuF2IU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sd5ZLJWQmss



Quote
I presume food gets spoiled if repeatedly heated to 60C despite it being canned?

Probably, but there are times and circumstances where you'll eat decade old creamed corn from a can, and be damn glad for the opportunity.....


No Life Club Posts: 1,527
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #54 on: August 30, 2019, 01:32:36 AM »
Not quit a BOB but I have a friend who lives in the countryside who keeps in the boot of his car,

A sleeping bag
A couple of 5l bottles of water
A huge can of breakfast in a can, basically beans with sausage, egg and bacon in a huge can.
A can opener, metal bowl, cup and spoon.

This is incase he breaks down, gets stuck in heavy snow.

Wintertime I add the following to my car for just in case: Extra clothes (warm enough to sleep in -30, wind and waterproof), warm boots, chocolate, snow shovel, a long sturdy rope (usually used to drag others back on the road), flashlight, knife, matches, toilet paper, some tools, 10 liters of extra gasoline and 1 liter of oil just in case. No water as everywhere is typically covered in snow and any in the car would likely be frozen stiff anyway.

Most of that stuff have to come to good use more than once. I am thinking of adding a big windproof bag and a sleeping bag. That would allow me to leave the car which might be a good idea - one of the major dangers in a stuck vehicle in a snow storm is getting hit by another vechicle who can't see you. (Similarly one of my major worries driving in snow storms is hitting someone stuck - or even driving in under a trailer or similar in motion).

"If only simple wasn't so hard" - me
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,879
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #55 on: August 30, 2019, 07:43:20 AM »
I always wondered about storing food and water in a car. Water in plastic containers probably gets a lot of bad chemicals from the plastic when hot and might freeze in the winter which means either that you can't drink it or you have a wet/frozen car. I presume food gets spoiled if repeatedly heated to 60C despite it being canned?

 :think:

I too have read about the harmful chemicals if plastic water bottles are stored at high heat location, and I think that's all about regular maintenance and swapping out those bottles if you want to.

On the other hand, if you live in an area where water might be frozen in trunk during winter, maybe keeping them warm/drinkable with blankets/sleep bag/cooler without ice are just as important.

Food planning is dependent on personal health condition, if a person has blood sugar or health concerns, he/she must plan accordingly.

Car kit is a very different animal than a personal survival kit, so it probably deserve a thread of it's own, but I always stress to my friends that don't ever romanticize survival situation vs bushcrafting/camping.  In survival mode, either you are immobilized/hurt/lost/stranded, and your and your groups' well being/existence are being threatened, and the objective is to find rescue as soon as possible.

Follow us on MTO Unleashed Challenge this month!
Free Magnets! Nessmuk Challenge in Sept
Comis Gear Youtube Channel
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,879
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #56 on: August 30, 2019, 07:54:38 AM »
Wintertime I add the following to my car for just in case: Extra clothes (warm enough to sleep in -30, wind and waterproof), warm boots, chocolate, snow shovel, a long sturdy rope (usually used to drag others back on the road), flashlight, knife, matches, toilet paper, some tools, 10 liters of extra gasoline and 1 liter of oil just in case. No water as everywhere is typically covered in snow and any in the car would likely be frozen stiff anyway.

Most of that stuff have to come to good use more than once. I am thinking of adding a big windproof bag and a sleeping bag. That would allow me to leave the car which might be a good idea - one of the major dangers in a stuck vehicle in a snow storm is getting hit by another vechicle who can't see you. (Similarly one of my major worries driving in snow storms is hitting someone stuck - or even driving in under a trailer or similar in motion).

Sounds good, I probably would add some kind of signal light/device in the list if I were you, just to alert other cars not to ram into the vehicle or yourself, if you do decide leaving the vehicle.

The decision of leaving a vehicle in white-out condition is important.  If the distance to rescue is short/manageable, you know exactly where to go and it is not dangerous to walk, then leaving it to find help might be an option.  Statically, I remembered reading that it is easier to spot larger object for search team, so changes of you getting help might be higher.

Follow us on MTO Unleashed Challenge this month!
Free Magnets! Nessmuk Challenge in Sept
Comis Gear Youtube Channel
No Life Club Posts: 1,527
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #57 on: August 30, 2019, 10:03:37 AM »
Sounds good, I probably would add some kind of signal light/device in the list if I were you, just to alert other cars not to ram into the vehicle or yourself, if you do decide leaving the vehicle.

Most cars these days have extra sharp backlights and of course high beams. In whiteout even the extra backlights are a joke as they get covered by snow or just visible within meters. The high beams do help if it is dark as you can at least tell something is in front somewhere. (Also explains why I prefer driving at dark in snowy conditions). I'm not sure any decent sized signal light will improve much on that? 

The decision of leaving a vehicle in white-out condition is important.  If the distance to rescue is short/manageable, you know exactly where to go and it is not dangerous to walk, then leaving it to find help might be an option.  Statically, I remembered reading that it is easier to spot larger object for search team, so changes of you getting help might be higher.

That is the thing. In whiteout you never start walking. Your visibility is very short - anything from the length of your hand to some meters. Chances are you'll get lost, tracks will be blown away, and then neither you or any resquers know where you are - or the way back. Further the wind and cold will be severe, and of course physically walking anywhere in deep snow will either just stop you or get you sweaty from the exercise. Which again will make you even colder. Starting to walk in whiteout is basically a recipe for freezing to death - even it looks kind of okish at the start you don't know how it will develop. Better and safer to wait around by the car. (People have even gotten lost trying to go out to take a piss by the car door...).

Thus my routine so far has been sitting around in the car. That works but with the worry of getting hit. If leaving the car it would just be for a few meters to get off the road - potentially with a rope in between. (And hopefully off the road, and not end up camping n the middle of it somewhere else! :ahhh  I guess that would earn me a Darwin award at least. :D )

To give you some idea - this is from the resque of a guy in a whiteout. He was luckily very well prepared, but weather was so bad the resquers couldn't get to his location (or anywhere) for about 24 hours. (Thus this is filmed after the weather cleared up!).

https://mediaorigin.nrk.no/movingstill/4f744fd2-017a-43d4-b44f-d2017a43d411/20190215145741/4f744fd2-017a-43d4-b44f-d2017a43d411_1080.mp4




« Last Edit: August 30, 2019, 10:15:52 AM by Vidar »

"If only simple wasn't so hard" - me
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,879
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #58 on: August 30, 2019, 10:42:14 AM »
Most cars these days have extra sharp backlights and of course high beams. In whiteout even the extra backlights are a joke as they get covered by snow or just visible within meters. The high beams do help if it is dark as you can at least tell something is in front somewhere. (Also explains why I prefer driving at dark in snowy conditions). I'm not sure any decent sized signal light will improve much on that? 

Yes, I think putting up the emergency light is probably at the least people should do.  If it is total whiteout condition where you can only see a few feet away, yes, I do agree probably not too much options there. 



Most ca
That is the thing. In whiteout you never start walking. Your visibility is very short - anything from the length of your hand to some meters. Chances are you'll get lost, tracks will be blown away, and then neither you or any resquers know where you are - or the way back. Further the wind and cold will be severe, and of course physically walking anywhere in deep snow will either just stop you or get you sweaty from the exercise. Which again will make you even colder. Starting to walk in whiteout is basically a recipe for freezing to death - even it looks kind of okish at the start you don't know how it will develop. Better and safer to wait around by the car. (People have even gotten lost trying to go out to take a piss by the car door...).

Thus my routine so far has been sitting around in the car. That works but with the worry of getting hit. If leaving the car it would just be for a few meters to get off the road - potentially with a rope in between. (And hopefully off the road, and not end up camping n the middle of it somewhere else! :ahhh  I guess that would earn me a Darwin award at least. :D )

To give you some idea - this is from the resque of a guy in a whiteout. He was luckily very well prepared, but weather was so bad the resquers couldn't get to his location (or anywhere) for hours and hours. (Thus this is filmed after the weather cleared up!).

https://mediaorigin.nrk.no/movingstill/4f744fd2-017a-43d4-b44f-d2017a43d411/20190215145741/4f744fd2-017a-43d4-b44f-d2017a43d411_1080.mp4



Those are some severe condition, and sometimes it didn't even have to be white out condition to pose danger to folks trying to survive a cold condition:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Kim

It saddens me when I first read about this story, but it is a classic survival story.  For every survival situation, finding rescue is the end game.  So any ways to signal for help(cell phone/radio/flashlight/whistle/sign/smoke/etc) or asking someone to look for you(if loss of contact) are both important.  The classic protocol of first aid > regulating body temperature(shelter/fire) > water > food are important, but all gears/prep are moot when there is no rescue to come in the end.

Follow us on MTO Unleashed Challenge this month!
Free Magnets! Nessmuk Challenge in Sept
Comis Gear Youtube Channel
No Life Club Posts: 1,527
Re: Venting and thinking about Urban Survival Kit/videos
« Reply #59 on: August 30, 2019, 02:02:28 PM »
Yes, I think putting up the emergency light is probably at the least people should do.  If it is total whiteout condition where you can only see a few feet away, yes, I do agree probably not too much options there.

I focused on whiteout simply because that is my car kit and total whiteouts are pretty much the only times I've had to stop in winter time. When it happens you are usually alone, in the middle of nowhere, and it is fair to assume the road is already or will be closed off for other traffic. You are on a road though, and it will be opened again at some point. Keep warm, wait and don't get hit by anyone still trying.

Those are some severe condition, and sometimes it didn't even have to be white out condition to pose danger to folks trying to survive a cold condition:

Cold is a killer all on its own of course, but most people up here are used to and well prepared for that part. It is when it comes in combination with another factor like getting lost, being stuck or immobilized, or getting wet it tends to get serious.

A real scary thing about getting proper cold is that your brain starts malfunctioning. You get indifferent, make bad choices and get real sleepy. (And this is way before you start undressing and peeing so you might still think you are level headed).

It is a lot harder to make it if you don't actually care if do, make bad choices in whatever effort you actually do, and really think sleeping seems very tempting. It is important to know this so you are prepared for your brain playing tricks on you. While you might not be able to make better decisions it might help you remember that you generally consider survival to be very important and that sleeping means death.
[/quote]

"If only simple wasn't so hard" - me
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).

 

Donations

Operational Funds

Help us keep the Unworkable working!
Donate with PayPal!
July Goal: $300.00
Due Date: Jul 31
Total Receipts: $23.00
PayPal Fees: $1.77
Net Balance: $21.23
Below Goal: $278.77
Site Currency: USD
 7%
July Donations

Community Links


Powered by EzPortal
SMF 2.0.17 | SMF © 2019, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.067 seconds with 33 queries.
© 2018 Defender Web & Tool