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Dutch Ovens 1501

Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,556
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #30 on: June 05, 2019, 08:52:17 PM »
 :drool: :drool: :drool:  enough said!   :like:

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No Life Club Posts: 2,450 Learn to swim...
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #31 on: June 15, 2019, 11:47:45 PM »
So it turns my dad has a Lodge 6qt camp dutch oven that's been collecting dust.  Hes going to lend it to me to do some experimenting with next time we see each other.  The only condition is, before I leave I have to cook something tasty in it.

SO, if anyone has any favorite recipes now is a good time to share them :) Any tha th you all share will be going down in my notebook to try.  Thanks in advance!
Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 21,331
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #32 on: June 20, 2019, 04:14:06 PM »
Nice.  Maybe head over to the Chili thread  :dunno:

I've always fancied a slow cooked stew in those.  Nothing complicated just good old fashion slow cooked meal. 

Esse Quam Videri
No Life Club Posts: 2,450 Learn to swim...
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #33 on: June 24, 2019, 03:43:43 AM »
Nice.  Maybe head over to the Chili thread  :dunno:

I've always fancied a slow cooked stew in those.  Nothing complicated just good old fashion slow cooked meal.

Great idea!  I may try my hand at some cornbread to go with it.
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 15,801

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Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #34 on: June 24, 2019, 06:01:35 AM »
Chili is great in a Dutch oven  :like:

Because chili is acidic (if you use tomatoes), you will need to re-season the Dutch oven afterwards. No big deal, I usually do a quick re-seasoning after each use, anyway.

A couple of other ideas:

Pot Roast: Lot of recipes for pot roast and it comes out well every time, if you go "low and slow". I use chuck roast and cook (braise) at 250ºF for 3-5 hours, depending on the size of the roast. The trick to good pot roast is to be sure there is liquid (beef stock, chicken broth, or beer) half way up the roast at all times and keep checking it for tenderness. Be sure to brown your roast first (in the bottom of the Dutch oven, of course). Add veggies, potatoes, mushrooms, garlic, bay leaves, oregano, thyme, etc.......  Once the roast is tender--fork tender--I usually take the lid off and let it simmer in the oven for 20-30 minutes to help thicken the sauce and brown some of the veggies. Oh, be sure to season (salt) your beef before browning it, and then check the sauce for salt when you are done the long braise. You can thicken the sauce (now a gravy) with a couple spoons of corn starch 'melted' into cold water and then added to the pot for that last 20 minutes. Or just mash a few of the potatoes into the sauce. Yum!

Biscuits and gravy: Making (American) biscuits is a classic thing to do in a Dutch oven. Cook your biscuits in the Dutch oven--I like to use a cake pan inside the Dutch oven to keep the bottom of the biscuits from scorching, but pros don't need to do this. Then remove the biscuits to a spot where they will stay warm, and fry up some sausage in the Dutch oven. When the sausage is browned up, remove some of the grease (or not). Then add some flour to the sausage and grease to form a thick paste (roux). When that paste starts to turn golden, add some warmed milk. Enough to make a thick gravy (or thin if you prefer...). At this point I like to add black pepper, cayenne pepper, and thyme. Add what you like, sage works well. Check for salt. Split a couple of biscuits and cover with the sausage gravy. A classic Dutch Oven dish, but you will need a nap.....  :rofl:
« Last Edit: June 24, 2019, 06:15:43 AM by Nix »

Illegitimi non carborundum
No Life Club Posts: 2,450 Learn to swim...
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #35 on: June 24, 2019, 06:35:24 PM »
Chili is great in a Dutch oven  :like:

Because chili is acidic (if you use tomatoes), you will need to re-season the Dutch oven afterwards. No big deal, I usually do a quick re-seasoning after each use, anyway.

A couple of other ideas:

Pot Roast: Lot of recipes for pot roast and it comes out well every time, if you go "low and slow". I use chuck roast and cook (braise) at 250ºF for 3-5 hours, depending on the size of the roast. The trick to good pot roast is to be sure there is liquid (beef stock, chicken broth, or beer) half way up the roast at all times and keep checking it for tenderness. Be sure to brown your roast first (in the bottom of the Dutch oven, of course). Add veggies, potatoes, mushrooms, garlic, bay leaves, oregano, thyme, etc.......  Once the roast is tender--fork tender--I usually take the lid off and let it simmer in the oven for 20-30 minutes to help thicken the sauce and brown some of the veggies. Oh, be sure to season (salt) your beef before browning it, and then check the sauce for salt when you are done the long braise. You can thicken the sauce (now a gravy) with a couple spoons of corn starch 'melted' into cold water and then added to the pot for that last 20 minutes. Or just mash a few of the potatoes into the sauce. Yum!

Biscuits and gravy: Making (American) biscuits is a classic thing to do in a Dutch oven. Cook your biscuits in the Dutch oven--I like to use a cake pan inside the Dutch oven to keep the bottom of the biscuits from scorching, but pros don't need to do this. Then remove the biscuits to a spot where they will stay warm, and fry up some sausage in the Dutch oven. When the sausage is browned up, remove some of the grease (or not). Then add some flour to the sausage and grease to form a thick paste (roux). When that paste starts to turn golden, add some warmed milk. Enough to make a thick gravy (or thin if you prefer...). At this point I like to add black pepper, cayenne pepper, and thyme. Add what you like, sage works well. Check for salt. Split a couple of biscuits and cover with the sausage gravy. A classic Dutch Oven dish, but you will need a nap.....  :rofl:

Wow thanks for all the great tips! You post made me hungry! I'll definitely try the biscuits and gravy.
No Life Club Posts: 2,450 Learn to swim...
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #36 on: July 07, 2019, 12:57:22 AM »
 Took my daughter up to the Ranch for a sleepover.  Her Grandpa had his dutch oven on site for us to try out.  Didnt do anything fancy, in fact might be the easiest recipe ever.  Camp donuts! Got some vegetable oil nice and hot.  Poked some holes in some generic brand buttermilk biscuits in a can.  Fried till brown and flipped.  Added to a bag full of sugar and cinnamon and let my little one give them a good shake to coat.  These were actually pretty tasty  :D



Zombie Apprentice Posts: 15,801

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Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #37 on: July 07, 2019, 01:49:19 AM »
Great way to break in a Dutch oven!  :like:

Illegitimi non carborundum
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,100 aka "G-Fiddle" and "Glen-Fizzle"
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #38 on: July 18, 2019, 12:02:08 PM »
I can see those camp donuts really put a smile on your daughters face!

[--- arms length ---] (-.-) 

                                ^-- where the cat sits
Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 21,331
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #39 on: July 18, 2019, 02:45:20 PM »
Great way to break-in the dutch oven for sure.  I bet her smile is even bigger, well done.   :like:

Esse Quam Videri
No Life Club Posts: 2,450 Learn to swim...
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #40 on: July 20, 2019, 05:18:35 PM »
Thanks guys!
Hero Member Posts: 910 Did you know Uranus has 22 moons?!?
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #41 on: October 02, 2019, 01:04:34 AM »
Venison stew with a cream of mushroom gravy base. My dutch oven of choice is the model with legs. It allows you to drop it into the campfire while still allowing air flow to keep hear flowing all around the stew pot.


Rather mundane quote entered here to approximate humor.
No Life Club Posts: 3,545
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #42 on: October 02, 2019, 01:53:41 AM »
Oh my!!! That looks so good.


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If I start and end the day above ground, it is a good day!

Hope yours is as good!
Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 21,331
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #43 on: October 02, 2019, 06:16:16 AM »
I'm content from dinner but I'd have a big serving if offered  :drool:

Esse Quam Videri
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,556
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #44 on: October 02, 2019, 04:44:09 PM »
Looks like another ridiculously good meal! :drool:

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Hero Member Posts: 910 Did you know Uranus has 22 moons?!?
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #45 on: October 03, 2019, 05:34:22 AM »
Last year we ground up about 15 lbs of venison to make some burgers. Whitetail is so lean, it really enhances the flavor if you can add some kind of fat. Relatives of mine will go to the butcher shop and pick up beef fat to grind with the venison. We ended up adding bacon to ours and it turned out magnificent. We cooked the burgers in the dutch oven by placing it to the side of the campfire, then adding a very small amount of coals around the base to build up heat. The key is to not get it too hot. The slow cooked deer/bacon burgers turned out amazing! Add a smokey flavored cheese to make the perfect campfire burgers.

Rather mundane quote entered here to approximate humor.
No Life Club Posts: 3,545
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #46 on: October 03, 2019, 05:07:00 PM »
Oh my!  That sound so good^




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If I start and end the day above ground, it is a good day!

Hope yours is as good!
Jr. Member Posts: 63
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #47 on: October 22, 2019, 11:22:28 PM »
I use my 12" Lodge to make dinners, but what I use it for the most is desserts!  Since they are sticky, I am a big fan of lining with parchment paper.

Lazy cobblers:  Line the oven with parchment paper.  Dump two cans of pie filling or fruit in heavy syrup in the bottom of the oven, sprinkle a white or yellow cake mix on the filling, cut up a stick of butter into pats and distribute the pats on top of the cake mix.  Cook for 45 minutes with 15 or so coals on the top and the same on the bottom.

Here is a link: www.lodgemfg.com/recipe/lazy-cobbler

I also do pineapple upside down cakes...which are awesome with real bacon crumbles added on top of the pineapple layer.  Don't knock it until you try it.  https://scoutingmagazine.org/2016/08/make-pineapple-upside-cake/

Another family and Troop favorite is mountain man breakfast. https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/216742/dutch-oven-mountain-man-breakfast/
Full Member Posts: 115
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #48 on: December 23, 2019, 01:58:44 AM »
Whether or not a piece of cast iron lasts is entirely up to you.  If you maintain the cure religiously it will last forever, if not don't waste your money. 
Dutch ovens with feet are designed to leave a space for hot coals below and the lid will have lip to hold coals above so that it can truly cook as a oven not just covered pot.  If you are going to be working on a indoor stove you might as well get a flat bottomed dutch oven.  You can always hold the dutch oven off the coals with the careful placement of rocks when you finally get outdoors. 

Everyone is talking about recipes so here's mine:

Peurco Pibil, slow roasted Yucatan pork shoulder cooked for four hours in a sauce of achiote paste with citrus juices, habanero peppers and tequila all encased in banana leaves. 
No Life Club Posts: 3,545
Dutch Ovens
« Reply #49 on: December 23, 2019, 02:06:54 PM »
I read that cooking acidic combinations in cast iron destroys the conditioning and can damage the surface causing it to put. 

Tomatoes are to be the worst, like with chili


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If I start and end the day above ground, it is a good day!

Hope yours is as good!
No Life Club Posts: 1,056
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #50 on: December 24, 2019, 03:23:36 AM »
Baking bread in the Combo Cooker:

(Image removed from quote.)


For the first 30 minutes, I use the bottom of the Combo cooker as the lid and cover the dough. This creates a steamy environment and protects the loaf from burning. After 30 minutes I take the bottom (now the lid) off and let the loaf finish cooking and browning.

Here, on the grill, but at this point, I use the same technique in Winter inside in the oven. It would work just as well on a camp fire, using a trivet or stand to keep the pan off the coals.

Is that the Lodge 3 quart?  What are your thoughts on it?  How does it do on a fire or coals... are a few well-placed rocks enough?  What about the size?
Full Member Posts: 115
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #51 on: December 24, 2019, 10:16:48 AM »
I read that cooking acidic combinations in cast iron destroys the conditioning and can damage the surface causing it to put. 

Tomatoes are to be the worst, like with chili


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The acid only damages the cast iron if you don't clean and re-season the pot after you are done.  If you just leave a dirty pot around to sit of course the acid will attack the iron.  Think of cast iron the same way you would high carbon steel.  If you cut a lemon and don't clean and re-oil the blade it will scar and pit, but if you take care of it it will be just fine.  In the middle ages swords weren't made out of stainless steel, without proper care they would rust and human blood would make it happen fast, but with proper care a swords could be handed down from generation to generation over a hundred years.



You don't have to take my word for it: check out Kent Rollins Youtube channel.  All he uses is cast iron and he knows how make it last forever.
No Life Club Posts: 3,545
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #52 on: December 24, 2019, 02:27:56 PM »
That is what I meant, you must re-season your cast iron after a thorough cleaning to prevent damage to your cast iron after cooking acidic foods. 

Yes, like not thoroughly cleaning knives after dressing out game or butchering.  Blood is very acidic.

My wife prepared a 4-alarm chili in her Dutch oven last summer. Toward the later part of the simmering black flakes began to appear in her mixture.  The black flakes were the pan’s seasoning layer, a few years worth.

My son is a devoted cast iron user (99%).   He uses a large stainless pot for his chilli (5 or 6 alarm style), and also his coney sauce at the fire station when on shift. He says it is not practical to destroy his seasoned oven to have to start over again seasoning, for his novelty chilli. 




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

If I start and end the day above ground, it is a good day!

Hope yours is as good!
Full Member Posts: 115
Re: Dutch Ovens
« Reply #53 on: December 25, 2019, 04:33:58 AM »
That is what I meant, you must re-season your cast iron after a thorough cleaning to prevent damage to your cast iron after cooking acidic foods. 

Yes, like not thoroughly cleaning knives after dressing out game or butchering.  Blood is very acidic.

My wife prepared a 4-alarm chili in her Dutch oven last summer. Toward the later part of the simmering black flakes began to appear in her mixture.  The black flakes were the pan’s seasoning layer, a few years worth.

My son is a devoted cast iron user (99%).   He uses a large stainless pot for his chilli (5 or 6 alarm style), and also his coney sauce at the fire station when on shift. He says it is not practical to destroy his seasoned oven to have to start over again seasoning, for his novelty chilli. 




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
As I said check out Kent Rollins channel, part of his job is making chili in cast iron on a regular basis and he doesn't have problems, I do a lot of acidic cooking in cast iron and I don't have problems either.

 

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