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Natural disasters

ca Offline Grant Lamontagne

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Natural disasters
on: September 25, 2019, 08:23:23 PM
A few weeks ago I got the joy of experiencing Hurricane Dorian, a Category 2 hurricane that hit my province.  It made landfall (supposedly) somewhere near my city, and we experienced winds in excess of 140km/hr or 100 miles an hour for those of you that refuse to appreciate the ease of Metric.  :D

Hurricane Dorian left us without power for about 48 hours- not a big deal, but enough to ruin most things in the fridge.

Last year at about this time I got to enjoy six different tornadoes that landed all around my house in Ottawa, and we were without power for (I think?) three days, which again, ruined just about everything in the fridge.

In 2004 I lived through the double whammy of Hurricane Juan, a Category 3 hurricane (and my first hurricane), which knocked out power for almost a week, followed a few months later by a storm, locally known as White Juan, which dumped approximately 6 feet of snow on Halifax within 24 hours.  And, knocked out power for several days.

None of this may have been life threatening or "survival" oriented, but I do have a number of thoughts that would come in handy for general preparedness, and I think I am reasonably qualified to make the following comments.  Feel free to disagree as much as you like, these are my thoughts, based on my experiences, and your geographical locations or other factors may vary significantly.

1- Always have cash.  In the event of a major blackout or other event, some places will be open, and things like canned foods, gasoline, naptha, propane etc may well be available, but there's no place to swipe a credit card.  This goes hand in hand with the next one-

2- If you have any advance notice, keep the tank full.  One of the nice things about hurricanes is that you generally have lots of notice that they are coming. Not so much with things like earthquakes or tornadoes, but, if there is a season (autumn seems to be prime natural disaster season in much of Canada) then fill the tank on your barbecue, home heating oil tank or the tank(s) in your car(s) often to keep them ready for anything.

3-  If you live in an urban area, water may not be a priority.  Most survival manuals start with obtaining water, but if you live in a city there is a good chance that the system is gravity fed, and, barring any damage to infrastructure, is unlikely to be affected by power outages.  You may not be able to get hot water, but you will likely have water.  Rather than stockpile it by fighting the masses the day before, make sure you have some purification tablets in case there is a backup and just have faith that water, of some quality and temperature, will come out.

4-  If you do feel that you need to stock up on bottled water, stick it in the freezer.  Keeping bottles of frozen water in the freezer will help maintain it's temperature longer and keep your food from thawing out.  Also, transferring some bottles from your freezer to your fridge may help some of the stuff in there last a little longer too.

5-  Charcoal Barbecues are better than Propane.  I know these are fighting words to Hank Hill, but you can run out of propane, and it can happen quickly if you are using the barbecue for everything, from heating water for coffee to cooking everything in the fridge or freezer so they don't go bad.  You can burn just about anything in a charcoal barbecue, as it's basically just a fire pit on legs, and there's a good chance that there is a lot of things to burn lying on your lawn.

6-  Have an axe.  No matter how nicely you ask it, a 20 foot branch is not going to fit in your barbecue without some modifications to either the branch or the barbecue.  Also, it is easier to dispose of when the city crews come around to do a cleanup, and, if it's too large for you to move or it is on a vehicle, house etc, it could be beneficial to be able to section it nicely.

It is disturbing in some ways how easily I cope with these situations.  I have a lot of camping gear, but most of it is still in Ottawa.  Even so, I have two barbecues (one propane, one charcoal), two isobutane stoves and a buttload of flashlights here, plus a couple of large capacity battery banks.  Oh yeah, and a good data plan for my cell phone and tablet, so we were actually drinking wine and watching Netflix during the power outage. 

Even what I consider "bare bones" put me in better shape than a lot of other people were in after Dorian, and that is a lesson I learned years ago after Juan.  I am rarely, if ever completely unprepared for these kinds of things, and I don't think I have a lot invested in the "need to have" things.  My aluminum pot and frying pan set is probably the most expensive part at about $50... the pocket rocket stoves were under $20 each, the isobutane is about $6/canister (will last days), flashlights and powerbanks are pretty cheap these days...

The other thought that is bouncing through my head after all of this is the differences between hurricanes and tornadoes.  Hurricanes are equal opportunity destructors- everyone gets some issues, while tornadoes are kind of like the anti-lottery.  Relatively few people experience damage, but the ones that do are very significant.  After a hurricane your roof may have been ripped off, but it's likely in a neighbor's yard.  In a tornado, your house may disappear and you will never see it again because it's landed 25 miles away.  The other neat thing about a tornado is you can be 50 yards away from it and suffer little more than mussed up hair.  However, people that are 35 yards away are trying not to be hit by their own car that could fall on them any second now....

Anyone else have any good natural disaster stories?  :D

Def
Leave the dents as they are- let your belongings show their scars as proudly as you do yours.


us Offline Poncho65

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #1 on: September 26, 2019, 03:59:07 AM
Always great to have some kind of preparation :like:

Back in February 2015 we had a good layer of ice (almost an inch) from freezing rain stay on trees for over a week :ahhh that wasn't the bad part though :whistle: that in itself didn't cause any problems but that Saturday morning instead of rain to wash away what was there, we received a little more freezing rain :facepalm: that was the breaking point, trees and power poles started snapping at the ground :( It took a couple days for crews to come through and clear the road enough to drive at all on the main roads and we were without power for over 8 days :oops: I kicked in survival mode pretty quickly though :cheers: My wife had already seen some of the damage online thanks to social media and knew the power would probably be out for several days :salute: I went outside and gathered some big chunks of ice that were around the house and used a couple big coolers that we had to save the refrigerator stuff, we had a couple portable power banks that we could use to charge phones, I thankfully installed a gas fireplace in the house when it was built that was rated to heat my house because my unit has to have electric to work even though it is partly runs on propane ::) :D We luckily never lost water and we also have a propane water heater so we also had hot water. We used our grill on the porch to cook with and cast iron skillets work very well for cooking lots of different things ;) By the first of the week we were able to get out. We bought a bigger portable power supply for keeping phones charged better, my little girl kept her tablet charged all week as well and had lots of kids TV downloaded on it, so that kept her occupied :like: We have a couple phones with plenty of data on them for regular interneting as well. I brought a generator home from work that was big enough to run a lamp, the TV and satellite box in our bedroom, so we had that as well :tu: All in all we didn't have that bad of a week because of a little forethought but you know how relieved I was when the power did come back on :dd: On a side note, I counted over 800 trees down (but cleared out of the way enough to drive through) in the 8 mile stretch from my house to the town I grew up in and that was only on the side of the road I was counting :ahhh No telling how many were down in total :o

They surveyed the area and they said that it looked like an F2 tornado had tore through an area 4 counties wide :-\ It was also declared a state of emergency in our area :ahhh


us Offline Aloha

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #2 on: September 26, 2019, 04:52:34 AM
Great info.  Mother Nature wreaks havoc but a little prep goes a very long way.  Trying to keep positive mentally and emotionally as well will go a long way.  Boss glad you are well and survived. 
Esse Quam Videri


us Offline Sos24

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #3 on: September 26, 2019, 05:21:08 AM
Thanks to where I grew up and the Navy moving me around, I have had the opportunity to experience many types of natural disasters to some extent or another.

I would agree with everything you said and have a couple things to add:
- As far as water, rather than purchasing bottled water each time a natural disaster is heading your way, I recommend purchasing some collapsible water containers and just fill them when anticipated.  I can store several 10L collapsible container under my sink and filled each takes up less space than the same quantity of bottled water.  If you don’t end up needing it just let the containers dry out and save for next season.

Have first aid items and know how to use them.  Many unforeseen things could occur resulting in injuries that need treatment.  Emergency services may get overwhelmed or may have difficulty getting to you, so being able to help until they get to you is important.


us Online MadPlumbarian

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #4 on: September 26, 2019, 05:38:23 AM
A few years back we got hit pretty bad, the whole state of Connecticut got knocked out for 1-2 weeks without power, we had oil heat which didn’t matter cause we’ll you need electric, so luckily I had a small propane heater and the whole family bunkered down in two rooms, I had some of the camping gear so that totally made life easier, and we still had running water, just not warm, even though I just put a brand new water heater in the day we got knocked out.
   It was around Halloween so it was chilly and the kitchen we kept cold for the food, and we had shoebox size plastic totes that we packed with snow and threw in the fridge in order to keep the temp down which we did, I must say it was a good bonding two weeks cause all we did was play board game, and do family stuff, I remember every night I’d fire up the propane heater one last time just to get it warm enough, and turn the battery radio on to see if anything changed, then one afternoon we got electric back, but only for 30sec, but then it came back 5min later, it had been a week, and even though the schools were up and running they wouldn’t let kids in because of how much snow was on the roofs, they asked for volunteers to raise snowblowers up onto the roofs in order to get it off, and I remember it was around halloween because it was canceled statewide!
JR
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As I sit on my Crapper Throne in the Reading Room and explode on the Commode, thinking, how my flush beat John’s and Jerry’s pair? Jack’s had to run for the Water Closet yet ended up tripping on a Can bowing and hitting his Head on the Porcelain God! 🚽


spam Offline comis

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #5 on: September 26, 2019, 06:34:08 AM
These are some good advices!  I agree with Sos24, I too use collapsible sink, where it takes less space and multi purposed. 

Depending on where you live, water may be a priority, even if you are urban;  especially after heavy rain/typhoon/tsunami, where there are flooding every and most underground water is contaminated.


Just to contribute my 2 cents:

1) Charged power bank/batteries for phones/walkie--important signal devices for rescue or communicate between family members/friends.  If you decide to leave town, or out to shop for supplies, always let people know where/when/what/who/how.

2) Road maps in car--yes, this may sound 'silly', given we use our phone gps for all the direction nowadays, but not so silly when your phone battery is ready to die out.

3) Freeze dried food--I sworn by these whenever I am car camping and too lazy to cook after a day of hiking or exercising.  Mountain House made some killer meals, and all it needs is just hot boiling water which is efficient to make. 

4) Multi fuel/gas lantern/stove--My go-to stove is MSR Whisperlite International and Coleman gas lantern, they both could take white gas or even unleaded gasoline.  If you want the same brand, coleman made some good multi fuel stove too.  Although it is debatable whether the gas lantern should be used indoor, since it needs air to ignite and may not be safe around small children.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2019, 06:47:55 AM by comis »


ca Offline Grant Lamontagne

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #6 on: September 26, 2019, 12:47:13 PM
I have a few freeze dried meals that I keep around for impomptu camping, hiking/kayaking trips and other needs.

I like the idea of keeping a water jug in the house and keeping my own water.  This recent "single use plastics" stuff has made me think about how much throwaway plastic I can do without, and bottles are pretty high on that list.

Megan isn't comfortable with burning gas fed appliances in the house, so no naptha, propane, butane etc lanterns, but fortunately battery powered lanterns pretty well last forever these days.

During the hurricane we had to eat, but going outside wasn't a brilliant idea, so luckily I had a self heating MRE type meal from OMeals.  It's the first time I have had a self heating meal, and I have to say that I really liked the convenience of it.  Heck, I could have used the heat generated to make other things as well, there was so much of it.  They are a bit pricey compared to Mountain House, Alpine Aire and some of the others, but the self heating option makes them worthwhile for emergencies.

Some time ago during a blizzard, about 1500 motorists were stranded on a section of highway not far from where DerekMac lives.  The self heating OMeal would have come in handy along with a bottle of water in an emergency kit, both to get a hot meal, but also to provide some short term heat, although the steam could cause problems in subzero temperatures.

I forgot another natural disaster- I have also experienced floods, although fortunately not first hand.  At least, nothing serious.  I have had a few leaks in the house, but not really a flood.  However, I lived a couple of hundred yards from the Ottawa River, which seems to be flooding every spring nowadays, much more than it used to.  Fortunately we were on the higher side, but Megan and I did both volunteer to help folks on the Quebec side each year, where many residents were flooded out of their homes.  Having a Jeep and a utility trailer was invaluable for hauling sand bags through washed out roads, yards and parks.

I'm not sure if I consider it a disaster, but I have also been through heat waves that were so bad, people were actually dying of heat stroke in the streets. 

I guess there's another internet rule for you:

Never travel with Tom Hanks
 

Don't live near Def...   :facepalm:

Def
Leave the dents as they are- let your belongings show their scars as proudly as you do yours.


us Offline Yadda

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #7 on: September 26, 2019, 02:44:11 PM
If you have a permanent residence and can afford it a whole house generator.
"It didn't hurt, flirt, blood squirt, stuffed shirt, hang me on a tree
After I count down three rounds, in Hell I'll be in good company" -  The Dead South


us Offline Poncho65

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #8 on: September 26, 2019, 05:07:52 PM
If you have a permanent residence and can afford it a whole house generator.

 :iagree: I do have a 7500 watt regular generator now that can be used once my main breaker had been turned off but if funds had permitted then I would have gotten one of the whole house ones that ran on propane :salute:


us Offline Rapidray

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #9 on: September 26, 2019, 05:18:00 PM
I have a few freeze dried meals that I keep around for impomptu camping, hiking/kayaking trips and other needs.

I like the idea of keeping a water jug in the house and keeping my own water.  This recent "single use plastics" stuff has made me think about how much throwaway plastic I can do without, and bottles are pretty high on that list.

Megan isn't comfortable with burning gas fed appliances in the house, so no naptha, propane, butane etc lanterns, but fortunately battery powered lanterns pretty well last forever these days.

During the hurricane we had to eat, but going outside wasn't a brilliant idea, so luckily I had a self heating MRE type meal from OMeals.  It's the first time I have had a self heating meal, and I have to say that I really liked the convenience of it.  Heck, I could have used the heat generated to make other things as well, there was so much of it.  They are a bit pricey compared to Mountain House, Alpine Aire and some of the others, but the self heating option makes them worthwhile for emergencies.

Some time ago during a blizzard, about 1500 motorists were stranded on a section of highway not far from where DerekMac lives.  The self heating OMeal would have come in handy along with a bottle of water in an emergency kit, both to get a hot meal, but also to provide some short term heat, although the steam could cause problems in subzero temperatures.

I forgot another natural disaster- I have also experienced floods, although fortunately not first hand.  At least, nothing serious.  I have had a few leaks in the house, but not really a flood.  However, I lived a couple of hundred yards from the Ottawa River, which seems to be flooding every spring nowadays, much more than it used to.  Fortunately we were on the higher side, but Megan and I did both volunteer to help folks on the Quebec side each year, where many residents were flooded out of their homes.  Having a Jeep and a utility trailer was invaluable for hauling sand bags through washed out roads, yards and parks.

I'm not sure if I consider it a disaster, but I have also been through heat waves that were so bad, people were actually dying of heat stroke in the streets. 

I guess there's another internet rule for you:

Never travel with Tom Hanks
(Image removed from quote.) 

Don't live near Def...   :facepalm:

Def
:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
Love the Tom Hanks reference


us Online MadPlumbarian

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #10 on: September 26, 2019, 05:29:31 PM
If we didn’t have any of our camping equipment we would have been screwed, kinda like now, after that what we did was just take a box and just stock it with stuff that wouldn’t spoil fast, and just toss it in the basement, but we moved again and kinda used it so we should do it again, one thing my grandfather used to do was every time we had a bad storm coming and could possibly lose power was fill the tub, then keep a 5gal bucket next to it, that toilet only takes 1.6gal to flush, and those tubs hold like 16 and up depending size, they now even have a bag that fits inside the tub to keep safe for drinking, so there’s lots of tricks, I gotta get the Mrs to get a box together, some of the things we had that week were
Spam / eggs
Spam / Mac cheez
Chili / Mac cheez
And other easy combos,
JR
"The-Mad-Plumbarian" The Punisher Of Pipes!!! JR
As I sit on my Crapper Throne in the Reading Room and explode on the Commode, thinking, how my flush beat John’s and Jerry’s pair? Jack’s had to run for the Water Closet yet ended up tripping on a Can bowing and hitting his Head on the Porcelain God! 🚽


es Offline microbe

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #11 on: September 26, 2019, 06:19:12 PM
Some good tips here. You never know what may happen, so having a bit of foresight will help you out when it does. Hurricanes, snow and freezing temps are not an issue where I live, but floodings have happened twice, and I am near fault lines between the Eurasian and the African plates, in earthquake territory.
My apartment has a waterpump in the basement, and when the electricity goes, there is no water pressure anymore. I have a few spare 8L waterbottles in the storage, a solo stove campfire and wood for emergency cooking, a 27000Mah battery pack to charge phones and flashlights, and a bunch of oldschool candles. I recon I can last over a week with 2 people, even with minor discomforts like drinking warm beer, before I get into more serious problems like running out of deodorant.
One thing I have been thinking to add is fishing gear, as the sea is just a short walk away, and having a freshly caught fish grilling on the fire is great way to raise your mood.
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us Offline Sos24

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #12 on: September 26, 2019, 07:34:21 PM

Megan isn't comfortable with burning gas fed appliances in the house, so no naptha, propane, butane etc lanterns, but fortunately battery powered lanterns pretty well last forever these days.


Along the lines of lanterns, I have a Luci inflatable solar lantern that is nice.  Just keeping it in a window is enough to recharge it and it gives off a good amount of light even on low.  No burning or batteries, and when deflated it is a nice small package.

As far as food, in addition to some of the other suggestions, I like to have instant or quick cook oatmeal on hand.  Just add boiling water and you have a hot breakfast or other meal. 

Fully cooked canned meats are also a good staple.  They are safe to eat cold or add them to noodles, rice, oats, etc for a quick meal.    Beans are also good to have, because the fiber fills you and the protein makes the meat stretch further.


us Offline Sos24

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #13 on: September 26, 2019, 07:47:08 PM
For helping with climate control, reflectix insulation cut to the size of your windows is an option I’ve heard mentioned.  You can paint one side black and leave the other silver.  If it is cold outside, the black outward can absorb some of the heat from the sun while the silver inside reflects any heat being produced back inside.  Reverse the covers if trying to keep cool. 

Reflectix can also be used as a thermal cooker or maintaining warmth, by wrapping pan in it and/or other insulating materials after heating to temperature and starting to cook.


es Offline microbe

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #14 on: September 26, 2019, 09:04:45 PM
Oh, and don't buy an Eton Scorpion solar/hand crank emergency radio/flashlight/charger. Total waste of money.
Once you go black you never go back
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spam Offline comis

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #15 on: September 26, 2019, 10:21:09 PM
For helping with climate control, reflectix insulation cut to the size of your windows is an option I’ve heard mentioned.  You can paint one side black and leave the other silver.  If it is cold outside, the black outward can absorb some of the heat from the sun while the silver inside reflects any heat being produced back inside.  Reverse the covers if trying to keep cool. 

Reflectix can also be used as a thermal cooker or maintaining warmth, by wrapping pan in it and/or other insulating materials after heating to temperature and starting to cook.

Your post reminded me about how my friend used to put up blankets/tarp within the house as partition, to conserve heat/energy during power outage in winter.  The generator was able to provide enough energy to an electric heater to keep everyone warm in the same living room most of the time.


us Offline Sos24

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #16 on: September 26, 2019, 11:22:28 PM
Your post reminded me about how my friend used to put up blankets/tarp within the house as partition, to conserve heat/energy during power outage in winter.  The generator was able to provide enough energy to an electric heater to keep everyone warm in the same living room most of the time.

Sealing off to one room with everyone it it can help a lot.  Even the extra bodies and a few candles can make a difference in a smaller space for heat.


us Online MadPlumbarian

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #17 on: September 27, 2019, 02:25:20 AM
There’s another little trick for your freezer, called penny in a cup,
If ever leaving your house and you won’t know if your electric will get cut, or kinda in this situation, take a cup of water or even better an old Rx pill bottle, fill it with water and freeze it, place the penny on top once ice and just leave it in the freezer.
If you return from your vacation and find the penny at the bottom of the cup of ice or container you know that the freezer melted the penny fell then it restarted and froze over and you gotta go through everything!
JR
"The-Mad-Plumbarian" The Punisher Of Pipes!!! JR
As I sit on my Crapper Throne in the Reading Room and explode on the Commode, thinking, how my flush beat John’s and Jerry’s pair? Jack’s had to run for the Water Closet yet ended up tripping on a Can bowing and hitting his Head on the Porcelain God! 🚽


us Offline Poncho65

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #18 on: September 27, 2019, 02:36:57 AM
That is an excellent tip, MadP :o I may very well use that one  :like:


us Offline BadMechanic

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #19 on: September 27, 2019, 05:21:21 AM
That is an excellent tip  :tu:


us Online MadPlumbarian

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #20 on: September 27, 2019, 05:38:20 AM
Thanks, there’s all sorts of tricks out there, but that’s why there’s subjects like this on the forum so everyone can learn what others know!
"The-Mad-Plumbarian" The Punisher Of Pipes!!! JR
As I sit on my Crapper Throne in the Reading Room and explode on the Commode, thinking, how my flush beat John’s and Jerry’s pair? Jack’s had to run for the Water Closet yet ended up tripping on a Can bowing and hitting his Head on the Porcelain God! 🚽


us Offline Aloha

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #21 on: September 27, 2019, 05:56:08 AM
Lots of good ideas.  :hatsoff:   
Esse Quam Videri


mc Offline Gerhard Gerber

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #22 on: September 27, 2019, 09:30:39 AM
Our main threat is the drought, I think we are 15 or 16 weeks away from Day Zero for water.

Having this in the news reminded me about my prepping efforts of a few years ago, I've eaten the food I'd stored and purchased more that the initial 6 x 25L water cans  :facepalm:


ca Offline Grant Lamontagne

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #23 on: September 29, 2019, 12:38:48 AM
Oh, and don't buy an Eton Scorpion solar/hand crank emergency radio/flashlight/charger. Total waste of money.

I have a Running Snail one, that I haven't really used much, but it says that with a mere 7-7.5 hours of hand cranking at 120rpm I can have a fully charged battery.  :D

Def
Leave the dents as they are- let your belongings show their scars as proudly as you do yours.


spam Offline comis

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #24 on: September 29, 2019, 04:29:57 AM
I have a Running Snail one, that I haven't really used much, but it says that with a mere 7-7.5 hours of hand cranking at 120rpm I can have a fully charged battery.  :D

Def
:facepalm:  120rpm for 7-7.5hours...I wonder how they got that figure. :D [size=78%] [/size]


es Offline microbe

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #25 on: September 29, 2019, 10:52:51 AM
I have a Running Snail one, that I haven't really used much, but it says that with a mere 7-7.5 hours of hand cranking at 120rpm I can have a fully charged battery.  :D

Def
:rofl:
It's not totally useless. When I charge mine via the little solar panel under the scalding Spanish sun for a whole day, the flashlight does work for several full minutes.
Once you go black you never go back
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us Offline ironraven

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #26 on: October 24, 2019, 05:10:33 PM
I'm late, I know.

For townsfolk (which is 90% of us, even most "rural" dwellers), I think the water issue is going to be a YMMV issue. I'm in a town with gravity fed water- the upper resivor is 200 feet in elevation above most of the town. And only 20 feet above me and I'm above the small one, so I'll run out of water before most will :P I still think three gallons per person is a good minimum. I've come to like one liter Mason jars, filled with boiled tap water. Even my uncle, who is largely disabled, can manage one of those. And even if the water flows, it might not be potable.

The wood grill as a BBQ- the small tripod charcoal grills are going on clearance right about now for a lot of us, and they are small. Don't assemble it, just toss a spare screwdriver (and maybe a flashlight, all leather work gloves, and a couple lighters and a roll of duct tape) in the box, reseal it and forget it until you need it. Even better would be a small cast iron hibachi, but I got my little sheet steal cheapie on clearance for $10. Mine isn't sealed up, it is used weakly after the paper shredder self destructed.

To go with it, I'm going to recommend a good 6-8L, all metal stew pot with a lid. Most our pots and pans, unless cast iron, have polymer handles. And a 2 cup/500ml ladle. That takes care of the potable issue, and you can stuff a lot of ramen, mashed potatos, and canned ham in one.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2019, 05:16:04 PM by ironraven »
"Even if it is only the handful of people I meet on the street, or in my home, I can still protect them with this one sword" Kenshin Himura

Necessity is the mother of invention. If you're not ready, it's "a mother". If you are, it's "mom".

"I love democracy" Sheev Palpatine, upon his election to Chancellor.


ca Offline derekmac

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #27 on: October 24, 2019, 07:47:43 PM
And here's what came to my mind when I read the title.  :facepalm:



us Offline Poncho65

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #28 on: October 25, 2019, 07:46:55 PM


ca Offline derekmac

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Re: Natural disasters
Reply #29 on: October 29, 2019, 02:44:38 PM
 :rofl:


 

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