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Multi-Tools Related to Japan 4005

Full Member Posts: 114
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #30 on: November 01, 2019, 04:53:35 PM »
1. LEATHERMAN
2. Seki City, “Japanese Knife Capital”

3. SOG
4. AL MAR
5. Spyderco
6. G. Sakai
7. Kershaw
8. IC. CUT
9. Fujimoto Knife, Kayama Knife
10. etc?





Fig. 3-1 SOG Paratool

3.1 Overview

     To be honest, I don't know about SOG much more than Wikipedia information...
SOG Specialty Knives & Tools, LLC is a company famous for their reproduction SOG Knife from the Vietnam era. [1]
The original SOG knife was also manufactured in Japan. [2] I think "Japanese Trading Company Yogi Shokai" was an Okinawan company, which awarded the first contract.  At that time, Okinawa was under the rule of the US military. I think it is highly possible that this company exported knives made in Seki city to the US military.

     Sorry we have gone off topic now.
In this chapter I will talk about the MTs made by SOG Specialty Knives & Tools, LLC.

3.2 Manufactures

     The current SOG knife is also manufactured in Seki city. [1]
Known manufacturer is,

G. Sakai
https://www.gsakai.co.jp/jp/

Hattori hamono Co., Ltd.
http://www.hattori-hamono.com

Kinryu hamono seisakujyo Co., Ltd (closed?)

3.3 SOG MTs Made in Japan

     There are only two SOG MTs that can be confirmed as made in Japan. Those are ToolClip and Micro ToolClip (1st Gen).

ENCYCROPEDIA
https://wiki.multitool.org/tiki-index.php?page=ToolClip
https://wiki.multitool.org/tiki-index.php?page=Micro+ToolClip

Great review of ToolClip, written by Grant Lamontagne
http://www.multitool.org/tools/sog/sog-toolclip-review

Great review of Micro ToolClip (1st Gen) , written by 665ae
http://www.multitool.org/tools/sog/sog-micro-toolclip-1st-gen-review



Fig. 3-2 ToolClip (First Model)



Fig 3-3 First model has a protection case for serrated blade.



Fig. 3-4 ToolClip (Later Model)



Fig. 3-5 ToolClip first model (left), and later model (right)







Fig. 3-6 3-7 3-8 Micro ToolClip 1st Gen (black), and 2nd Gen (pink)


     There is no clear evidence, but I think G.Sakai created these MTs.
I will consider it in the G.Sakai chapter.







Fig. 3-9 3-10 3-11 A.G. Russell Compact Multi Tool
I think they are the same manufacturer because the pliers are the same material (lost-wax casting?).


3.4 Question

     By the way, in the description of Wikipedia [1]
Quote
Many of SOG's folding knives and multi-tools are made or assembled in the United States, with the higher priced folders being made by G.Sakai in Seki City.
What does "higher priced folders" mean? Does this mean "sheaths" or "cases" ?


References

1. WIKIPEDIA. (2018). SOG Specialty Knives, Retrieved October 30, 2019, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SOG_Specialty_Knives

2. WIKIPEDIA. (2017). SOG Knife, Retrieved October 30, 2019, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SOG_Knife

Full Member Posts: 114
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #31 on: November 02, 2019, 07:03:25 AM »
> comis

I'm very happy that you are pleased.  (v´∀`)ハ(´∀`v) Thank you very much!
I want to participate in a tour around the three major production areas (Sheffield, Solingen, and Seki) someday.
I am not very familiar with knives. Please let me know if there are any mistakes or additional information.(´∇`)
No Life Club Posts: 2,963 Lifelike and remarkably self similar
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #32 on: November 03, 2019, 12:18:52 AM »
Folders = folding knife, folding pocket knife

"Drink your big black cow
And get out of here." -  Steely Dan
Full Member Posts: 114
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #33 on: November 03, 2019, 01:25:00 AM »
Folders = folding knife, folding pocket knife

New knowledge has increased thanks to you!!  :salute:
I didn't know that at all. Σ(゚口゚;)//
"Impossible" and "folders means folding knife" are not in my dictionary.  :rofl:
And there is clear evidence G.Sakai created these blades. (⌒▽⌒;)
Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 20,149 I may get older but I refuse to grow up.
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #34 on: November 03, 2019, 01:41:35 PM »
Wow, you have gathered a lot of very interesting information and pictures in this thread.

I think our wiki.multitool.com site admins would be glad if they could add these articles to the wiki as a series, with your permission, of course.  Some very valuable information here. :hatsoff:
Full Member Posts: 114
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #35 on: November 04, 2019, 01:08:05 AM »
> enki_ck

I am very honored to hear that.  (〃⌒∇⌒)
Thank you very much!
I'm glad to share my knowledge with many people who love MTs. Please feel free to use what I have posted. d(*´∀`*)b
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 10,549 Man of Multiple MultiTool Manufacturers
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #36 on: November 05, 2019, 07:04:57 AM »
すばらしい仕事、ひらぼう!

物事がどのように生まれ、どこから来たのかを読むのは魅力的です。特にマルチツール。
別のメンバーが述べたように、あなたが明らかにした多くの情報は本当にwikiに文書化する必要があります。 wikiのコードの意味を理解できれば、間違いなくやってみようと思いますが、完成させようとしたのは1つだけでした。私は少し怠け者で、コンピューターのバックグラウンドから12年離れていると思います。
wikiシステムをどれだけ知っていますか?

もう一度、マルチツールの世界への日本人の関与に関するデータを編集してくれてありがとう。控えめに言っても簡単な仕事ではありません。
それがイネムリを引き起こしたとしても、あなたを責めることはないでしょう。 :cheers:

Pontificating particularly pious positions pertaining to polymorphic paraphernalia. G-Man.
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 13,891
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #37 on: November 05, 2019, 01:57:02 PM »
Just catching up on this WONDERFUL thread :tu:

And ended up regretting I sold my Minitool :'(

Buy now or regret later
Full Member Posts: 114
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #38 on: November 07, 2019, 05:32:48 AM »
1. LEATHERMAN
2. Seki City, “Japanese Knife Capital”
3. SOG

4. AL MAR
5. Spyderco
6. G. Sakai
7. Kershaw
8. IC. CUT
9. Fujimoto Knife, Kayama Knife
10. etc?






Fig. 4-1 Memorial 6


Fig 4-2 To improve the appearance.


Fig 4-3 STAINLESS STEEL JAPAN


1. Overview

     When Al Mar was Gerber's chief designer, he designed the gentleman's knives "Silver Knight", the company's long hit. And G.Sakai had manufactured Silver Knight. [1] The relationship between Al Mar and G.Sakai was born at that time.
Almost all knives were manufactured by G. Sakai from the time he established Al Mar Knives until he died. [2]

     Subcontract manufacturers of G.Sakai at that time (these are all in Seki City);

Mitsuboshi Cutlery Co., Ltd.
https://mitsuboshi-cutlery.com/index.html

Tak Fukuta (TAKBLADE / Fukuta Cutlery Mfg. Co.)
* In Wikipedia, it is “Tak Fujita”, but I think it’s a mistake.
http://www.takblade.com

Hattori hamono Co., Ltd.
http://www.hattori-hamono.com

     After Al Mar died in 1992, Al Mar Knives switched its knife production to Moki Knife in Seki City.

Moki Knife Co., Ltd
http://www.moki.co.jp

     In 2019, they moved production to China.






Fig. 4-4, 4-5 4×4 Tool Mate (EOD Knife)
Upper) initial model, Lower) late model




Fig. 4-6, 4-7 initial model


Fig. 4-8 Left) initial model, Right) late model
The initial model was not stamped “SEKI-JAPAN”.


2. Current Status

     Almost all knives and MTs that were originally designed by Al Mar seems to be discontinued. G.Sakai had the right under the original contract signed by Al Mar that allowed G Sakai to manufacture and market knives under the Al Mar label for the non-U.S.market. [2] However, they have discontinued the Almer model. G.Sakai sell only stock in Japan.
I can still purchase several models on G.Sakai Japanese sites. [3] But you can't purchase any Al Mar knives on English sites. [4]





Fig. 4-9, 4-10 Quick Pliers (Quickclip Ⅳ)


Fig. 4-11 Upper) 4×4 Tool Mate, Lower) Quick Pliers
Quick Pliers is little longer than 4×4 Tool Mate.


Fig. 4-12 A simple model composed of pliers and half-serrated blade.
Oh, no. A lot of fingerprint…


Fig. 4-13 SEKI-JAPAN, of course.

3. About Logo

     That square logo is a combination of chinese characters. (Fig. 4-1)
Many Chinese-Americans have both American and Chinese names. 
馬國森 is the Chinese name of Al Mar in Chinese characters.

馬 國森 = Ma Guosen ( is last name means “horse”. 國森 is first name means “country and forest”. )

     There are two other types of logo. One is not painted red. (Fig. 4-4) The other is painted red, but just in it. [5]
MHO, the red square logo means seal stamp used by Chinese and Japanese instead of signing official documents. May be G. Sakai didn't color logos after Al Mar passed away,  because they respect him and expressed allegiance. And then they may had put a different logo on the new products.



References

1. Fasteners Mailorder System. (2019). Gerber Silver Knight Project part1, Retrieved November 04, 2019, from https://www.fast-mos.com/silverknight01.htm
2. Wikipedia. (2019). Al Mar Knives, Retrieved November 04, 2019, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Mar_Knives
3. G. Sakai online shop. (2019a). AL MAR, Retrieved November 07, 2019, from https://www.gsakai.co.jp/jpnshop/html/products/list.php?category_id=7https://www.gsakai.co.jp/jpnshop/html/products/list.php?category_id=7
4. G. Sakai international com. (2018). Retrieved November 07, 2019, from http://www.gsi-japan.com/shop/html/index.php
5. G. Sakai online shop. (2019b). AL MAR badge, Retrieved November 07, 2019, from https://www.gsakai.co.jp/jpnshop/html/products/detail.php?product_id=369https://www.gsakai.co.jp/jpnshop/html/products/detail.php?product_id=369





Fig. 4-14, 4-15 Upper) 4×4 Tool Mate Special, Lower) U.S. Army Knife
The handle material is aluminum that has been TUFRAM processed.


Fig. 4-16 4×4 Tool Mate Special has a saw instead of a serrated blade.


Fig. 4-17 U.S. Army Knife has same components except for pliers.


Fig. 4-18 U.S. Army Knife


Fig. 4-19 Left) 4×4 Tool Mate Special, Right) U.S. Army Knife
« Last Edit: November 07, 2019, 06:53:04 AM by hiraboo »
Full Member Posts: 114
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #39 on: November 07, 2019, 10:06:45 AM »
> GLBM

I think someone may feel uncomfortable to hear that American brands are made in Japan. But when I investigate various things about MTs, I realized there are craftsman spirits, enthusiasm, trust, respect, and friendship (like you and me?). (ノ*´_○`)人(´○_`*)ノ
And when I posted here, there was an unexpected new discovery. It's amazing experience! d(* ̄∇ ̄)

I'm very happy that you make suggestions about wikipedia. But I don't know how to edit wikipedia at all. I'll challenge that someday. Before that, I want someone to correct my many grammatical mistakes.  (´ヘ`;)

For now, I will concentrate on writing the remaining chapters. φ(゚ω゚*)

> Mechanickal

Thank you for reading!
I wish you didn't have hard time to understand my funny English.  (^▽^;)

And I wish you can find new MiniTool!
Sr. Member Posts: 491 Outdoorsy type and over-opinionated buffoon
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #40 on: November 07, 2019, 11:24:30 AM »
Great thread Hiraboo :tu:

Let's not forget the humble Higonokami, a little knife with a big history and beauty to match  :)
Full Member Posts: 114
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #41 on: November 08, 2019, 02:50:40 PM »
> greenbear

I was surprised that you know "肥後守 Higonokami". ∑(・ω・ノ)ノ
It seems that there is a little boom overseas as well.
I owned a cheap higonokami when I was an elementary school student. At that time, most children owned it.
We used it to sharpen the pencil, engraved chopsticks to make rubber band gun, cut out cardboard to make a mask, etc.
My father used it for gardening.  ( ´ー`)。о(Nostalgic)

...But unfortunately I don't know that well. m(_ _)m Maybe you know it better than me.
Sorry for not meeting your expectations. I also look forward to someone posting about it. o(^∇^)o
Sr. Member Posts: 491 Outdoorsy type and over-opinionated buffoon
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #42 on: November 08, 2019, 06:55:38 PM »
> greenbear

I was surprised that you know "肥後守 Higonokami". ∑(・ω・ノ)ノ
It seems that there is a little boom overseas as well.
I owned a cheap higonokami when I was an elementary school student. At that time, most children owned it.
We used it to sharpen the pencil, engraved chopsticks to make rubber band gun, cut out cardboard to make a mask, etc.
My father used it for gardening.  ( ´ー`)。о(Nostalgic)

...But unfortunately I don't know that well. m(_ _)m Maybe you know it better than me.
Sorry for not meeting your expectations. I also look forward to someone posting about it. o(^∇^)o

Higonokami are highly respected in the UK by a small but dedicated minority and practitioners of martial arts.  I have one myself, nothing special just a basic version  :tu:

PS you did meet my expectations - please take it as a compliment Hiraboo San  :salute:
Full Member Posts: 114
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #43 on: November 11, 2019, 03:34:49 PM »
1. LEATHERMAN
2. Seki City, “Japanese Knife Capital”
3. SOG
4. AL MAR

5. Spyderco
6. G. Sakai
7. Kershaw
8. IC. CUT
9. Fujimoto Knife, Kayama Knife
10. etc?






Fig. 5-1 Look! Up in the sky! It’s a bird.
It’s a plane.
It’s Spyderco! (Pin badge)


1. Overview

     Spyderco Knives, Inc. is a famous knife maker known for its uniquely shaped blades with large thumb holes. A large part of the firm's knife production is outsourced to foreign contractors in countries such as Japan, Taiwan, Italy, and China. [1]
G.Sakai was the OEM maker for Spyderco. [2]
SpydeRench is Spyderco’s monumental MT. The tool blade was once temporarily manufactured in Japan.



Fig. 5-2 T01S SpydeRench (Spyder Edge 440-C USA)
It’s not a pin badge.


Fig. 5-3 Two-setting Slip Joint Pliers


Fig. 5-4 Adjustable Wrench


Fig. 5-5 Driver Bits


Fig. 5-6 Frame


Fig. 5-7 Upper) LEATHERMAN Charge Ti, Lower) SpydeRench


2. Feature of SpydeRench

     This tool is equipped with two-setting slip joint pliers and adjustable wrench. (Fig. 5-3, 5-4)
The frame is made of cast stainless steel, not made by bending a stainless steel plate like other MTs. Therefore, the frame has a complicated shape. (Fig. 5-6)
A blade like a folding knife, not a simple blade. (Fig. 5-7)



Fig. 5-8 T01P SpydeRench (Plane Edge 440-C USA)






Fig. 5-9, 5-10, 5-11 T01P SpydeRench (Plane Edge 440-C JAPAN)


Fig. 5-12 T01PS SpydeRench (Combo Edge AUS-8 Taiwan)


3. Consideration

     When and why was SpydeRench made in Japan? I want to guess.
     According to the catalog, [3] the sales time of the models is as follows.


Tab. 5-1 Catalog notation of available models

SpydeRench T01     SpydeRench T01     byrdRench BY15
Year     440-C (USA)AUS-8 (Taiwan)8Cr13MoV
1999
-
-
-
2000
P, S, PS
-
-
2001
P, S, PS
-
-
2002
P, S, PS
-
-
2003
only PS
-
-
2004
-
-
-
2005
-
-
-
2006
-
-
-
2007
-
-
-
2008
-
only PS
only P
2009
-
only PS
only P
2010
-
-
only P
2011
-
-
only P
2012
-
-
-
P = Plain Edge, S = Spyder Edge (Serrated Edge), PS = 50/50 combination


     Was the SpydeRench marked with "USA" really made in the USA?
About this question, JesperHoo in BLADEFORUMS.COM got the reply from Spyderco; [4]
Quote
The SpydeRench is made in the USA as well as the SpyderFly.

Amanda Hinnen
Customer Service
Warranty & Repair
Team Spyderco
820 Spyderco Way
Golden, CO 80403
1 800 525 7770 x255
CustomerService@Spyderco.com
"Make it a great Day"

     In the comment of the Japanese knife shop clerk about SpydeRench; [5]
Quote
I heard that the manufacturing process was first manufactured in the United States, then all parts were sent to Japan and assembled in Japan.
Some parts did not combine well and production was interrupted many times.
Naturally, the number of arrivals in Japan was extremely small and the stock shortage was repeated.
It's a legendary tool.

     IMO;
     When all the parts including blades were made in USA, I don't think they transported all the parts to Japan just to assemble them. I guess that the SpydeRench marked with "USA" was whole made and assembled in USA. And American parts and Japanese blades were assembled for the Japanese market and sold mainly in Japan.
It may have occurred around 2002 when the plain edge model was out of stock.

     Certainly a legendary tool. I want to see Spyderco challenge again. But there will be no third resurrection.


References

1. MULTITOOL ENCYCLOPEDIA. (2019). Spyderco, Retrieved November 10, 2019, from https://wiki.multitool.org/tiki-index.php?page=Spyderco
2. Wikipedia. (2019). Al Mar Knives, Retrieved November 10, 2019, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Mar_Knives
3. Spyderco, Inc. (1999 - 2012). Catalog, Dealer Catalog, Product Guide
4. BladeForums.com. (2019). SpydeRench is made in where?,  Retrieved November 10, 2019, from https://www.bladeforums.com/threads/spyderench-is-made-in-where.328845/
5. Knife specialty store CREEK. (2019). [Haibanhin] T01P Spyderench Plain Old Model, Retrieved November 10, 2019, from
http://www.bigwestcreek.com/pages/knives/spyderco/spy_t01p_spydr_rench_.html





Fig. 5-13, 5-14 Look! Up in the sky! It’s a byrdRench
(BY15 Plain Edge 8Cr13MoV China)




Fig. 5-15, 5-16 Bonus image! byrd 8-Tool Harp
(BY13 China)
« Last Edit: November 11, 2019, 03:41:18 PM by hiraboo »
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 13,891
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #44 on: November 11, 2019, 03:44:18 PM »
One of my favs!

I recently found a second Spyderench and was delighted to see it's been used but not abused.

So I can keep one mint, and use the other. :D

Buy now or regret later
Full Member Posts: 114
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #45 on: November 12, 2019, 05:59:06 AM »
Great find, Mechanickal! ( ^ω^)b
Please cherish the mint one.
But I am worried, because I heard there is "two is one and one is none" rule.
( ̄ー+ ̄)
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 13,891
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #46 on: November 12, 2019, 08:16:23 AM »
Great find, Mechanickal! ( ^ω^)b
Please cherish the mint one.
But I am worried, because I heard there is "two is one and one is none" rule.
( ̄ー+ ̄)
You should be, since it's true! :ahhh

I'm anxiously awaiting your next posts :popcorn:

Buy now or regret later
Full Member Posts: 114
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #47 on: November 16, 2019, 04:09:59 PM »
1. LEATHERMAN
2. Seki City, “Japanese Knife Capital”
3. SOG
4. AL MAR
5. Spyderco

6. G.Sakai
7. Kershaw
8. IC. CUT
9. Fujimoto Knife, Kayama Knife
10. etc?






Fig. 6-1 G.Sakai Musashi
Left) Take out one blade and use it as a knife.
Right) Two blades can be used as scissors.


1. History of G.Sakai

     G.Sakai was once a small subcontractor for Mitsuboshi Cutlery, named Sakai Hamono Mfg., Inc. They became the OEM of various famous knives manufacturers, since manufactured Gerber's Silver Night. I didn't know how a Japanese small workshop was able to form an OEM partnership directly with the large company Gerber, because even on the webpage of G.Sakai there are no details about this history.
This time I found that information on the website of Fasteners Mailorder System. [1]

     Fasteners Mailorder System has been importing and selling excellent knives in Japan since 1970. At that time, president Sakae Wada introduced a custom knife to Japan for the first time, and also sold mass production knives such as Gerber and Buck. He was a pioneer in this area. He is a deceased.
The following text is a reorganization of Wada's memoirs previously appeared in a magazine.
I changed it to Wada's first person style because it was easy to translate.

Quote
Beginnings;
     The beginning dates back 30 years. (* This manuscript was written in 2003.) One day, a young man visited our office. He told me that he was the eldest son of a factory that produces knives for export in Seki City, Gifu Prefecture.
He told me that he saw an advertisement for our imported knives in a magazine, then said, “You seem to be importing high-class knives, but we can also make high-class knives in Japan”. He proudly lined up several knives on the table.
I think I felt cheeky about this confident young.

     I said, looking at the knives lined, “These are toys, existing a completely different dimension from the knives we're dealing with. No one think high-class, except you."

    This young man from Seki City was Yuuhei Sakai, now President of G.Sakai Co., Ltd. This was the first encounter of our company and G. Sakai, and I think it was also the start point of Silver Knight.

     Mr. Yuhei was surprised at the unexpected answer and didn’t know what to do. I took Gerber and Buck knives from the shelf and explained everything that was different from his knives. I criticized many things very severely without hesitation. Mr. Yuhei listened silently and went home.

     After that, I forgot the event. One day, Mr. Yuhei came again. He used my critique as a reference, studied a lot, improved his knives, and tried them again. At this time, I started to think that he might be the person who would realize the dream of making high-class knives that I had for many years.

     I enthusiastically explained to him what needs to be improved, described what high-class knives are, asked him to bring something improved again. To cheer him up, I even said that if he brings a good knife next time, I will buy it. After this, Mr. Yuhei began to make round trips between Seki and Osaka.

     I had dealt with Gerber for a long time, so I explained to James R. Raske, vice president of Gerber at that time, the excellence of Japanese knives and had asked him to deal them as much as possible. At that time, business in the United States was booming. Production of knives could not keep up with demand. President Pete Gerber was very pride and was not interested in Japanese knives. But he knew that Japanese cameras, watches and TVs were excellent. He might have expected that a Japanese knives would be equally good.
Mr. Raske was motivated little by little because I persistently proposed it. Thanks to his persuading the boss, Gerber decided to conditionally import Japanese knives.

     It was severe condition that if the quality is not as expected, the deal ended immediately. However, after that, this deal will last for over 25 years.

     The memoir continues to the topic of Silver Night production, but I would like to introduce it if there is another opportunity.

     Taking the success of Silver Night as an opportunity, Sakai Hamono changed name to Gerber Sakai in 1977. Then aiming to popularize their own brand, they changed name to G.Sakai in 1982.




Fig. 6-2, 6-3 Libero
Caring for the ears, nose and beard.




Fig. 6-4, 6-5 MobileTool


2. G.sakai Original Brand MTs

     G.Sakai has created many original brand knives, but didn't make MTs much.
I rarely see them at Japanese auctions.



Fig. 6-6 MobilePenchi
Calling “pliers” as “penchi” in Japanese. It seems to be derived from “pinch".


Fig. 6-7 Upper) MobileTool, Lower) MobilePenchi
MobileTool is the handle part of the MobilePenchi.








Fig. 6-8, 6-9, 6-10, 6-11 Upper) BuckTool 360CL, Lower) MobilePenchi
As you can see, the two MTs are very similar.
BuckTool has been on sale since 1996. [2] On the other hand, MobilePenchi has been on sale since 2001(?).


Fig. 6-12 Access direction of each component. MobilePenchi; Outside


Fig. 6-13 Access direction of each component. BuckTool; Inside


3. Missing Link

     This is the tool I have been looking for. [3]
The pliers are made of the same material as the SOG ToolClip and the A.G. Russell Compact Multi Tool.
The handle is made in the same way as the AL MAR 4×4 Tool Mate.
Pliers take Japanese “yattoko” style. Bladesmiths use “yattoco” to handle burnt iron.
I think this is a tool that symbolizes G.Sakai, an OEM of various manufacturers. I really want to see the real thing.



Fig. 6-14 FieldTool
I think it is “Missing Link”.


References

1. Fasteners Mailorder System. (2019). Gerber Silver Knight Project part 1, Retrieved November 04, 2019, from https://www.fast-mos.com/silverknight01.htm
2. Multitool.org. (2016). Multitool Timeline, Retrieved November 16, 2019, from https://www.multitool.org/timeline
3. Fukami, H. (1995). Nihon to sekai no knife catalog '95, p13. Japan: Seibidou Syuppan Co.,Ltd.

No Life Club Posts: 4,471 Apparently it is possible to have too many tools;)
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #48 on: November 17, 2019, 03:24:57 AM »
hiraboo,

I enjoyed reading about these, thank you very much for another extremely informative post, you are a truly valuable asset to MTo   :salute:  :tu:  :tu:  :tu:


That first knife/scissors "Musashi" tool looked quite familiar, and sure enough it is very similar to the Kershaw Twocan (Two Can)
https://www.multitool.org/knives/kershaw-twocan
I looked at my Twocans, on the knife blade they had the following markings:
SS variant: "PATENT PENDING", "KAI, 1001, Japan"
Black variant:  "PAT. NO. 6,877,229", "KAI, 1001BLK, Japan"
I think they also made a Red variant

The MobilePenchi also had design similarities to the Bucktool (and one big difference - outside opening tools).


Given the obvious similarities, I wonder if there were some licensing/patent issues with these tools, which led to them only being sold in Japan ?
« Last Edit: November 17, 2019, 03:53:55 AM by gregozedobe »

babola: "Enjoy your tools and don't be afraid to air your opinion and feelings here, but do it in courteous and respectable way toward others, of course."
Full Member Posts: 114
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #49 on: November 18, 2019, 10:56:57 AM »
> Greg

Thank you very much! I feel too much compliments. (〃ω〃)
Hey, bartender, give everyone a beer! (=゚ω゚)ノ

I am always amazed at your vast knowledge. (´⊙ω⊙`) Living Encyclopedia!
I didn’t know about Kershaw Twocan. Thank you for new knowledge.

No. 6,877,229 is patent owned by G.Sakai (Gerber Sakai, at that time).
https://patents.google.com/patent/US6877229B2/en?oq=patent+6877229
…It's a great era to be able to investigate such things immediately on Google. ( ´_ゝ`)

KAI corporation, owner of Kershaw, was also originally a Seki city company. So they have an OEM contract with each other.
I think even for the same item, the brand name of Kershaw will be more advantageous overseas.

The Twocan (Musashi) on the web page you indicated is a initial model.
And Musashi which I posted is a later model. The official name of the later model is “Musashi + one”, means plain edge plus one serration point.
Carabiner has also been changed.

Musashi Miyamoto was a famous samurai. He has a legend that had fought more than 60 times and never lost. The technique he created was a two-sword style. d( ̄  ̄)

I’m investigating About MobilePenchi and BuckTool. Please wait…
« Last Edit: November 18, 2019, 11:02:36 AM by hiraboo »
Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 21,337
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #50 on: November 18, 2019, 03:31:25 PM »
I am just now catching up with this wonderful thread.   :hatsoff: Thank you very much for all the work you've done. 

Esse Quam Videri
Full Member Posts: 114
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #51 on: November 23, 2019, 12:23:51 AM »
1. LEATHERMAN
2. Seki City, “Japanese Knife Capital”
3. SOG
4. AL MAR
5. Spyderco
6. G.Sakai

7. Kershaw
8. IC. CUT
9. Fujimoto Knife, Kayama Knife
10. etc?






Fig 7-1 K-TOOL made in China


1. A Brief History of Kershaw

     The Knife Depot website has a very detailed web page about the history of Kershaw[1], so please refer to it.
This page seems to be reached by following the link as ...

          HOME > Learn > Knife Knowledge Center >

... but the link is broken. What is written here is wonderful, but I think most people cannot read it. I accessed the web page directly using Google search.

     Pete Kershaw, once was a Gerber's National Sales Manager, founded his own company Kershaw Knives in Lake Oswego, Oregon, in 1974. First, he visited Japan to request the manufacture of a knife he designed. A production group named "Kershaw-kai" was formed in Seki city with KAI Corp. as a mediator.[2] The members of the group are Hattori-hamono Corporation and Sakurai Knife Manufacturer (currently Moki Knife Co., Ltd.).
And consignment production of Kershaw brand knives started.

     In June 1977, KAI USA was founded and Pete Kershaw was appointed president. Kershaw Knives became a subsidiary of KAI group.

     Until 1997, knives were produced and exported in Japan.[3] In 1997 the U.S. production facility was opened in Wilsonville, Oregon. Currently, KAI USA manufacturing facilities are located in Tualatin, Oregon. Other products are imported from Japanese and Chinese factories.[4]







Fig. 7-2, 7-3, 7-4 CARABINER TOOL made in China


2. A Brief History of KAI

     KAI corp. was established in Seki city in 1908. They have been producing pocket knives from the beginning.[5] However, they were very successful as razor makers. After that, it became a large enterprise in the knife industry that also produces cutlery, scissors, beauty instruments, medical instruments and so on.
They were also active in exporting overseas, and in the early 1960s they were selling in Europa, and started OEM production for US manufacturers.[6]









Fig. 7-5, 7-6, 7-7, 7-8 A100 made in USA


3. About A100

     Of course, the MT of the Kershaw is the A100.

Multitool Encyclopedia
A100
https://wiki.multitool.org/tiki-index.php?page=Multi-Tool+A100

Adapter A100TA
https://wiki.multitool.org/tiki-index.php?page=Adapter+A100TA

Great Review of A100 by David Bowen
http://www.multitool.org/tools/miscellaneous/kershaw-a100-review

     I think there was little information about the development and birth of A100.
There is information on the KAI group web page, so let's quote it.
I was translating the sentence halfway, but realized that there was an English version...

Quote from KAI PERMANENT COLLECTION #12[7]
Quote
Remembering the A100:
the Kershaw that left a legacy in the multi-tool market

In 1997, KAI USA was in great need of a hit product, inspiring Kershaw designers to conceive their boldest project yet. The result? Kershaw released the groundbreaking “A100 Multi-Tool”.
The first, most obvious feature is found in the tool’s pliers. This multi-tool was the first ever to feature locking plier jaws. Users could tighten or loosen the pliers with the tension adjustment, achieving the perfect grip around an object.
Being a Kershaw, it’s only natural for the A100 to incorporate a sharp blade. Without opening the handle, A100 owners could easily open the blade from outside of the tool with one hand. The combo edge locked into place with a reliable liner lock.
Inside the handle itself, you could take advantage of a screwdriver, a bottle/can opener, a two-sided file, a flathead screwdriver and a replaceable hacksaw blade.
The A100 holds a special, unique place in KAI USA history. And even though Kershaw isn’t known for multi-tools, the product is still defined by one word: “quality”.

Quote from HISTORY OF KAI vol.12[8]
Quote
Koji ( * the third generation president) also introduced new measures for KAI USA, whose business conditions had been deteriorating due to the strong yen at the time. He believed that what’s sold in the US should be designed by Americans, and that it is best to make them in the US. In 1996, a 25-year-old factory manager worked with 10 employees to start developing a multi-tool with an included pocket knife. ( * In the Japanese version, it’s interesting that this part is “to produce a multi tool that incorporates a vise function into a Leatherman tool”.) Through trial and error, the product was finally completed in 1997.
     Kershaw also sold victorinox type MTs, I’ll mention it next chapter.









Fig. 7-9, 7-10, 7-11, 7-12 Adapter A100TA made in Japan?
You pinch this tool adapter when you use it. You can use it in 3 different angles.


References
1. Knife Depot. (n.d.). Kershaw Knives: History, Innovations, and More. Retrieved November 21, 2019, from https://knife-depot.com/pages/kershaw-knives-history-innovations-and-more
2. Chiiki keizai kenkyukai. (2009). Houkoku siryou (Chiiki keizai kenkyuu "Chiiki keizai no kaisousei to kankeisei -- sijyou sistem ni chakumoku site") . Sihon to Chiiki. 5, pp25-26. http://hdl.handle.net/2433/86199
3. KAI corporation. (2019a). Press release No.2014040201 About sale of 40th Kershaw anniversary memorabilia. Retrieved November 21, 2019, from https://www.kai-group.com/news/id/438
4. Wikipedia. (2019). Kershaw Knives. Retrieved November 21, 2019, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kershaw_Knives
5. KAI corporation. (2019b). History of Kai vol.1. Retrieved November 20, 2019, from https://www.kai-group.com/factmagazine/en/issue/2/detail/15/
6. KAI corporation. (2019c). History of Kai vol.7. Retrieved November 20, 2019, from https://www.kai-group.com/factmagazine/en/issue/8/detail/71/
7. KAI corporation. (2019d). Kai Permanent Collection #12. Retrieved November 21, 2019, from https://www.kai-group.com/factmagazine/en/issue/12/detail/102/
8. KAI corporation. (2019e). History of Kai vol.12. Retrieved November 21, 2019, from https://www.kai-group.com/factmagazine/en/issue/13/detail/110/





Fig. 7-13, 7-14 Bonus image?
Upper) A100, Lower) knockoff


Fig. 7-15 Left) knockoff, Right) A100


Fig. 7-16 A100


Fig. 7-17 knockoff





« Last Edit: November 23, 2019, 01:14:16 AM by hiraboo »
Full Member Posts: 114
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #52 on: November 23, 2019, 12:31:18 AM »
> Aloha
Thank you very much! ( *´꒳`* )
I was able to do more than half. I'm tired. But I will do my best. ( ੭ ˙˙ )੭
Full Member Posts: 114
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #53 on: November 25, 2019, 04:30:17 AM »
About BuckTool and G.Sakai MobilePenchi

BuckTool was imported and sold in Japan in 1996 by Fasteners International Ltd. (currently Fasteners Mailorder System, which was the company that introduced G.Sakai to Gerber, see Chapter 6).
I found a magazine ad announcing a new release.


Imai. K. (1996). KNIFE Magazine No.60 (Oct. 1996), p19. Japan: World Photo Press. Co., Ltd.

4 years later, MobilePenchi was newly released in 2000. I also found a magazine article reporting the new release of MobilePenchi.
Interestingly, both tools were on the same page.


Fukami. E. (2000). Nihon to sekai no knife catalog 2000-2001, p34. Japan: Seibidou syuppan Co.,Ltd.

It is not direct evidence that there were no licensing/patent issues. But at least in Japan, no one thought there were some problems.

About Leatherman Mini Tool Gold

I think it was TiNi coating.
But I found several descriptions that Mini Tool was "gold-plated" (or "EGP") in some magazines.
« Last Edit: November 25, 2019, 05:39:31 AM by hiraboo »
Full Member Posts: 114
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #54 on: November 30, 2019, 08:53:39 AM »
1. LEATHERMAN
2. Seki City, “Japanese Knife Capital”
3. SOG
4. AL MAR
5. Spyderco
6. G.Sakai
7. Kershaw

8. IC.CUT
9. Fujimoto Knife, Shikayama Knife
10. etc?








Fig. 8-1, 8-2 IC.CUT MTs
Black) Stunt V Type-5 Sportsman
Red) Stunt V Type-2 Traveler
Yellow) Unknown MT with old logomark (prototype?)


1. About IC.CUT (Ishikawa Hamono Seisakujyo Co., Ltd.)

     Ishikawa Hamono Seisakujyo Co., Ltd. has been exporting cutlery since the 1940s.[1] They are the earliest manufacturer in Seki city that has created its own knives brand (since 1964?). Some of you who like knives may know their brands, IC.CUT and Hiro Original Knives.
The knives they make are known to be relatively inexpensive but of high quality.

     As I wrote before, when I was a kid, almost every kids had small knives like Higonokami. We played with cutting and carving various things with a knife.
However, some violent incident using knives happened, then Japanese society has moved in the direction of regulating knives. In recent years, it has become a trend to prevent children from holding knives, even small Higonokami.
Ishikawa Hamono are trying to protect a culture where children use knives and play with nature. They manufacture knives for children and conduct activities to convey the correct usage.[2]



Fig. 8-3 Stunt V Type-5 Sportsman and Type-2 Traveler with Victorinox Standard Spartan (91mm)




Fig. 8-4, 8-5 Stunt V Type-5 Sportsman


2. About IC.CUT MTs

     They made MTs named Stunt V series. Unfortunately, these are already discontinued.
There is not much material left on this MTs specifications. So I want to leave a table of variations of this MTs here.


Table 8-1 Variations of Stunt V Series

     Type-1
     Hobby
     Type-2
     Traveler
     Type-3
     Camper
     Type-4
     Fishing
     Type-5
     Sportsman
Function
4
7
9
10
12
Blade
Keyring
Tweezers
Toothpick
Can opener
Cap opener
Slotted screwdriver
Phillips screwdriver
Wood saw
Fish scaler
Hook disgorger
Scissors








Fig. 8-6, 8-7, 8-8 Stunt V Type-2 Traveler


     As mentioned in the previous chapter, Kershaw also sold this type of MTs.
As you can see in the picture,[3] Stunt V and Kershaw's MTs are very similar. Perhaps Kershaw's MTs were manufactured by Ishikawa Hamono.



Fig. 8-9 3 models (① to ③ left back) are IC.CUT Stunt V
2 models (④ and ⑤ right front) are Kershaw #3030 and #3020
These are very similar.



References

1. Gifujirushi. (2014). Ishikawa Hamono Seisakujyo Co., Ltd. Retrieved November 28, 2019, from http://www.gifujirushi.com/075ishikawahamono.html
2. morinoco knife. (2019). morinoco knife wo kodomotachi ni todoketai hamonoya no omoi. Retrieved November 28, 2019, from https://morinoco-seki.jp/blog/story/162/
3. Fukami, H. (1992). Nihon to sekai no knife catalog '92~’93, p 44. Japan: Seibidou Syuppan Co.,Ltd.







Fig. 8-10, 8-11, 8-12 Yellow unknown MT with old logomark.
Some Stunt V had an old logo.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2019, 09:40:22 AM by hiraboo »
Full Member Posts: 114
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #55 on: December 06, 2019, 02:52:49 PM »
1. LEATHERMAN
2. Seki City, “Japanese Knife Capital”
3. SOG
4. AL MAR
5. Spyderco
6. G.Sakai
7. Kershaw
8. IC. CUT

9. Fujimoto Knife, Shikayama Knife
10. etc?






Fig. 9-1 The only Fujimoto knife I have.


Fig. 9-2 Upper) Victorinox Tourist (84mm)
Middle) Fujimoto knife
Lower) Victorinox Classic (58mm)


     The title of the chapter was “Kayama knife”, but it was correctly “Shikayama knife”. I'm sorry.

1. About "Tokyo Knives"

     All I wrote in the previous chapters were about knife makers related to Seki City.
The Fujimoto knife and Shikayama knife that I intend to write in this chapter are called "Tokyo knives". In other words, they are knives created by knife craftsmen in Tokyo.

     In Seki City and many other Japanese cutlery production areas, the knife production method is a division of labor. Tokyo knives, on the other hand, uses an atelier system in which one craftsman is in charge of everything from parts production to assembly to finishing.

     I would like to introduce a lot of art-like tools created by Tokyo craftsmen, but I only have one small Fujimoto knife. So, please refer to the linked gallery.





Fig. 9-3, 9-4 Specialized craftsmen engraved silver plates of about 0.5mm. Plates were attached to stainless steel handles.


Fig. 9-5 Trademark known as "F-wing".
Other trademarks include “Two chess knights facing each other”, “YAX”, “ROBUSO”, “TASSA”, etc. Speaking of the last three, different marks are given by different wholesalers.






Fig. 9-6, 9-7, 9-8 Model name is maybe # 27 Sterling silver engraved 5-chou


2. About Fujimoto Knife

     Yasuhiro Fujimoto (the deceased) was born in Tokyo in 1927. In 1939, he got a job at a knife maker in Tokyo at the age of 13. He was the industry pioneer who had been working on the manufacture of folding knives, especially multi tool knives, among the earliest in Japan.

     He studied for a while at a manufacturer in Seki city, and became independent in 1949. He established Fujimoto Knife Factory in Tokyo. At that time, it was mainly manufacturing pocket knives for export, and silver handle knives and money clips were popular in other countries including the United States.
Later, with the expansion of production, there were times when more than a dozen craftsmen were in the Factory. Even though the number of craftsmen increased, most of the work was manual.

     Mr. Fujimoto died in 1987 at the age of 60. The Fujimoto knife we see today is mostly the work of his disciples. Even so, the reliable operation and the good finish of the parts clearly show the craftsmanship of Fujimoto, the teacher.[1]

Links about Fujimoto knife

Knife specialty store CREEK. (2019). Fujimoto Yasuhiro (1927~1987)
http://www.bigwestcreek.com/pages/knives/fujimoto/fujimoto_all_01.html
http://www.bigwestcreek.com/pages/knives2/fujimoto/fjmt_2_all_custom01.html

Keihin hamono senmonten-kai. (2014). Ginza-Kikuhide 1. Fujimoto Yasuhiro hizou knives
http://hamono-net.or.jp/anatano/ginzakikuhide/item/fujimoto_-knife/

Nunokiri jinzaemon no home page. (2019). Tokyo knives ni tuite
http://www4.tokai.or.jp/nunokiri/fujimoto0.html
http://www4.tokai.or.jp/nunokiri/fujimoto1.html
http://www4.tokai.or.jp/nunokiri/fujimoto2.html
http://www4.tokai.or.jp/nunokiri/fujimoto3.html
http://www4.tokai.or.jp/nunokiri/fujimoto4.html
http://www4.tokai.or.jp/nunokiri/fujimoto5.html
http://www4.tokai.or.jp/nunokiri/fujimoto6.html
http://www4.tokai.or.jp/nunokiri/fujimoto7.html
http://www4.tokai.or.jp/nunokiri/fujimoto-kousatu.html



Fig. 9-9 Shikayama knife that became the cover of the magazine.[2]


3. About Shikayama Knife

     Toshiaki Shikayama was born in 1933. In 1952, he started working at Fujimoto Knife Factory at the age of 19. He had always loved making things, and studying hard. As a result, he immediately demonstrated his talent as an excellent craftsman in the factory.
He has worked on many masterpieces as an assistant to Mr. Fujimoto.
He worked as a factory craftsman, but after Mr. Fujimoto died, he became independent in 1987 and created his own workshop.
Since then, he was called the “last Tokyo Knives craftsman” who inherited Fujimoto's technique, and he had been making knives with a focus on manual work.
But unfortunately he is old and doesn't make knives right now.[2]
The Shikayama knife is all manufactured by Mr. Shikayama alone, so the distribution volume is very small compared to the Fujimoto knife. And because there are many collector rivals, the works are very expensive.

Links about Shikayama knife

Hamono Furukawa. (2019). Tokyo knives saigo no densyousya Shikayama Toshiaki
https://www.frkw.com/index004.html

Knife specialty store CREEK. (2019). Shikayama Toshiaki
http://www.bigwestcreek.com/pages/knives2/sikayama/sikayama_all_01.html

Masahide Hamonoten. (2011). Shikayama Toshiaki-si no custom knives
http://www.masahide.com/shikayamatosiaki.htm

Nihon syokunin meikou-kai. (2014). Shikayama Toshiaki Sakuhin Tenjikan
http://www.meikoukai.com/contents/tenjikan/06/6_26/index.html

Matsusaka Knives Club. (2013). Gallery (Shinji Kuno Collection)
http://www.ma.mctv.ne.jp/~hkprojec/gallery.html


References

1. Fukami. H. (1994). Nihon to sekai no knife catalog ’94, pp 4-7. Japan; Seibidou Syuppan Co., Ltd.
2. Imai, K. Inaba, H (2008). Knife magazine No. 133 (2008.12), pp 5-15. Japan; World photo press Co., Ltd.



Fig. 9-10 All the Multi-Tools Related to Japan that I have introduced so far.


     Oh yes, I found the topic of Chapter 10.
     Next and last!



Fig. X Next notice.

« Last Edit: December 06, 2019, 03:17:14 PM by hiraboo »
Global Moderator Abandon All Hope Ye Who Enter Here... Posts: 45,588
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #56 on: December 07, 2019, 01:54:36 PM »
What a great job of cataloging these tools  :hatsoff:
Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 21,337
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #57 on: December 07, 2019, 04:13:48 PM »
That bit holder for the Kershaw A100 is really neat.  Something I've never seen. 

IC CUT are very interesting tools.  I'm going to go back and reread and look at the pictures again. 

Great job again. 

Esse Quam Videri
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,574
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #58 on: December 07, 2019, 05:32:21 PM »
What a great job of cataloging these tools  :hatsoff:


 :iagree: It's been a wonderful read, thank you for putting in all the effort!

Join us! MTO Unleashed Challenge in June
Free Magnets! Nessmuk Challenge in Sept
Comis Gear Youtube Channel
Full Member Posts: 114
Re: Multi-Tools Related to Japan
« Reply #59 on: December 11, 2019, 05:58:11 AM »
> SteveC

Thank you very much!
Please look forward to the last. o(●´ω`●)o

> Aloha

I also thought that everyone would see that bit holder for the first time.
But there was already a review here MTo.
MTo is amazing. (゚д゚;)

I will write about MTs of IC.CUT later because I have newly found out about them.

> comis

It was the first time I was praised about English sentences.
(*′∇`*)φ.。.:*・♥·♡τнänκ чöü♡·♥·•°


About Leatherman MINI-TOOL Gold

I found the Leatherman MINI-TOOL Gold model on sale at a Japanese Yahoo! auction. I will refrain from reproducing the photos. Instead, I will describe it in text.

1. It is in a box for a normal stainless model printed with “TSS 300A, Made in USA”.
2.  A sticker printed “TSG 300A MINI-TOOL Gold” in Japanese is affixed.
3. Comes with a coin-like tag engraved with “LT'87 1/300”.

Unfortunately, what I own is not tagged.
As guessed, this seems to be a limited model that Leatherman Tool Japan made only 300 in commemoration of the new release of MINI-TOOL. (Made in USA. Gold plated in Japan.)

If this is true, it  is serial No. 1 that was listed at the auction!?
It's quite expensive, so I'm looking at the situation.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2019, 08:50:49 AM by hiraboo »

 

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