Multitool.org Forum
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
+-

Hello Lurker! Remove this ad and much more by logging in.


The reality of bugging out. 3298

Sr. Member Posts: 326
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #60 on: April 22, 2020, 08:39:51 PM »
Car camping could work. I’m 6’5”, I take up a lot of space in the SUV with the backs seats down..... but it’s been done. The hardest part is filling the gap between the front row and second row of seats so that a pillow doesn’t drop down between the seats all night.

I want to get one of those hitch trays. Getting things off the roof rack can be a bit tiresome, the tray, I think, would be good for everyday items and the bulk stuff and refills on the roof rack.
Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 24,630
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #61 on: April 22, 2020, 09:52:26 PM »


Lots of options.  Just over 6 feet myself so my 6 ft bed could work with tail gate up. 

Esse Quam Videri
Sr. Member Posts: 326
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #62 on: April 22, 2020, 10:52:29 PM »
(Image removed from quote.)

Lots of options.  Just over 6 feet myself so my 6 ft bed could work with tail gate up.

That’s a beautiful car tent. Assuming that’s yours, what model is it? Do you have any pros or cons you can share for this setup?
Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 24,630
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #63 on: April 22, 2020, 11:17:21 PM »
I wish it were mine.  I've looked into it for my Tundra with leer top but I can do a tarp with tailgate down as I've done before and be fine.  Very little rain gets in. 

Esse Quam Videri
Sr. Member Posts: 326
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #64 on: April 22, 2020, 11:54:30 PM »
Love the tundra, great truck. Never had a chance to own one, owned a Taco for 4 years before switching to an SUV as a more practical solution for a family vehicle.
Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 24,630
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #65 on: April 23, 2020, 06:16:45 AM »
Its been great.  10 years strong and just barely breaking a sweat.  Had a Yukon Denali and Avalanche and neither were running when I let them go.

Esse Quam Videri
No Life Club Posts: 1,613
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #66 on: April 23, 2020, 02:19:55 PM »
So many things to touch on about this from my own experience and research and it is hard to know where to start really?

I am setup to respond top emergencies as an Amatuer Radio Operator.
We organize and drill frequently throughout the year and I have responded several times during the real deal too and sadly I guess the main thing that I take away from the experience that I have is that you can really not know in advance what to expect on almost any level and that each emergency is its own thing and almost a living being with unique challenges at every level.

As a Radio guy the thing we each focus on is to provide and secure means of communication when all else has failed. Usually normal comms will stutter if not fail completely and of course Katrina was a glaring example of this for sure.

There was almost Zero Cell service that was reliable for hundreds of miles and our group helped tp provide essential 911 services for an area in Mississippi for almost 6 months from a local School building that was setup as a shelter,thats right we were the 911 communicators using HAM radio so that services could function at all for months!

And now my computer is borked up on this site and I will have to continue this from another computer when I can?
Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 24,630
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #67 on: April 23, 2020, 02:46:40 PM »
I feel we keep it simple for us in terms of planning and gear.  We are not trying to preemptively mitigate every possible scenario.  A big part of what comes into play at the time of a crisis is your personality.  How we deal with stresses and difficulties.  If you are one to be frustrated in everyday life stuff or become annoyed at the smallest things then it'll be a challenge in that respect.  Some people shut down.  We saw people who walked to the Superdome looking like zombies.  The sheer shock of it all was emotionally overwhelming.  I cant even begin to imagine how I'd feel. 

People are struggling to stay home now.  The stresses of our current situation is pushing some to their limits.  The mental health aspect seems to surprise some.   

 

Esse Quam Videri
No Life Club Posts: 2,605
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #68 on: April 23, 2020, 03:04:36 PM »
I feel we keep it simple for us in terms of planning and gear.  We are not trying to preemptively mitigate every possible scenario.  A big part of what comes into play at the time of a crisis is your personality.  How we deal with stresses and difficulties.  If you are one to be frustrated in everyday life stuff or become annoyed at the smallest things then it'll be a challenge in that respect.  Some people shut down.  We saw people who walked to the Superdome looking like zombies.  The sheer shock of it all was emotionally overwhelming.  I cant even begin to imagine how I'd feel. 

People are struggling to stay home now.  The stresses of our current situation is pushing some to their limits.  The mental health aspect seems to surprise some.   

 

That seems to be a result of individual perception of the danger of going out, relative to the danger of staying in - which varies by region and population density as much as individual factors.  One thing that seems to get lost is the problem of being a carrier - and that the less strict we are, the longer this will drag on. 

I'm starting to notice complacency in my area - public places are becoming more congested day by day although official restrictions haven't been lifted.

When a region sees a reduction in the number of new cases, some restrictions will be lifted.  The carriers of the virus are the ones in control over that.
No Life Club Posts: 1,613
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #69 on: April 23, 2020, 03:11:16 PM »
That seems to be a result of individual perception of the danger of going out, relative to the danger of staying in - which varies by region and population density as much as individual factors.  One thing that seems to get lost is the problem of being a carrier - and that the less strict we are, the longer this will drag on. 

I'm starting to notice complacency in my area - public places are becoming more congested day by day although official restrictions haven't been lifted.

When a region sees a reduction in the number of new cases, some restrictions will be lifted.  The carriers of the virus are the ones in control over that.

Yeah especially those in Georgia who are just jonesing for that new tattoo. :dunno:
Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 24,630
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #70 on: April 23, 2020, 03:17:13 PM »
 :salute: I get that.  Our city is not sure what it wants to do.  They opened the parks but are still telling people to social distance and yet one neighborhood is now telling folks they have to wear masks  :dunno:.  We had a spike in deaths and positive cases so the Gov. is trying to tell everyone to stay the course. 

The projected positive cases and deaths didn't materialize ( thankfully ) so yes people are thinking this was all for naught.  I went to the ATM and the streets near me were busier than I've ever seen.  Many if not all were wearing masks but they were out.  I've not seen this many people out walking ever.  It been great to see all the dogs getting walked.   

Esse Quam Videri
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 15,068 Yoo-hoo, big summer blowout!
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #71 on: April 23, 2020, 03:38:35 PM »
:salute: I get that.  Our city is not sure what it wants to do.  They opened the parks but are still telling people to social distance and yet one neighborhood is now telling folks they have to wear masks  :dunno:.  We had a spike in deaths and positive cases so the Gov. is trying to tell everyone to stay the course. 

The projected positive cases and deaths didn't materialize ( thankfully ) so yes people are thinking this was all for naught.  I went to the ATM and the streets near me were busier than I've ever seen.  Many if not all were wearing masks but they were out.  I've not seen this many people out walking ever.  It been great to see all the dogs getting walked.   
Thanks to everyone staying at home.
In a pandemic situation like this, you know you did it right when it seems like a overreaction in hindsight.
If it seems like you didn't do enough in hindsight.... :-\
I fear that we're about to go through this all over again with more deaths due to the early reopenings.

Hooked, like everyone else. ;)

All hail the hook!
Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 24,630
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #72 on: April 23, 2020, 03:50:54 PM »
I feel the same.

Esse Quam Videri
No Life Club Posts: 2,605
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #73 on: April 23, 2020, 04:29:35 PM »
:salute: I get that.  Our city is not sure what it wants to do.  They opened the parks but are still telling people to social distance and yet one neighborhood is now telling folks they have to wear masks  :dunno:.  We had a spike in deaths and positive cases so the Gov. is trying to tell everyone to stay the course. 

The projected positive cases and deaths didn't materialize ( thankfully ) so yes people are thinking this was all for naught.  I went to the ATM and the streets near me were busier than I've ever seen.  Many if not all were wearing masks but they were out.  I've not seen this many people out walking ever.  It been great to see all the dogs getting walked.   

Right - that's what I mean by regions of people thinking only of their own experience and acting based on that.  (or worse - saying it's a hoax elsewhere).  They did materialize in my area, and I have had several acquaintances, and a few older friends die from COVID.   It's all about perspective and timing.  Anyone in the US who is not in the 3 or 4 hot-spots that were hit hard and early could say that this was an overreaction, and that it wasn't as bad as they said it would be.  To them, I would point out this chart - In a time and place where measures were taken relatively early, one would see a milder outbreak, and they'd be none the wiser of what could have been.

One of my friends - one of the guys who got me into the Buck 110 style of knife, and also first introduced me to the practicality of the Leatherman PST died this week from COVID.
No Life Club Posts: 2,605
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #74 on: April 23, 2020, 04:38:36 PM »
Thanks to everyone staying at home.
In a pandemic situation like this, you know you did it right when it seems like a overreaction in hindsight.
If it seems like you didn't do enough in hindsight.... :-\
I fear that we're about to go through this all over again with more deaths due to the early reopenings.

I agree.  This can incubate in healthy people without symptoms and come right back in a few weeks. If we re-open too early.... it's like saying your parachute slowed your descent from the plane, so you can cut the paracord 200 feet above the ground.   

Less than 2% of the US population has been tested.  We have no idea where the virus could be brewing. 

Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 24,630
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #75 on: April 23, 2020, 06:14:20 PM »
I am really sorry to hear you have friend who are positive and lost friends  :(.   

Esse Quam Videri
No Life Club Posts: 2,605
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #76 on: April 23, 2020, 06:48:46 PM »
I am really sorry to hear you have friend who are positive and lost friends  :(.   

Much appreciated.  :-[
No Life Club Posts: 2,605
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #77 on: April 24, 2020, 01:18:25 AM »
.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2020, 01:33:54 AM by ElevenBlade »
Sr. Member Posts: 326
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #78 on: April 24, 2020, 01:54:19 AM »
Less than 2% of the US population has been tested.  We have no idea where the virus could be brewing.

The survey they just did in NY state suggest 13% of the state population has the ‘marker for Covid 19’ and 21% in NYC. That’s really scary
New User Posts: 2
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #79 on: April 25, 2020, 10:06:49 AM »
I think that there are only a few good reasons to bug out.

1. The area you live in is going to quickly become uninhabitable.
We're talking nuclear power plant meltdown, hurricanes, long term droughts, war.

Luckily, these things don't happen very often.


But there are some general rules:

1. Have a bug out plan and a rally point before the crisis hits.

2. Don't relocated to areas where it's hard to survive due to the weather and climate.
 If you're in the U.S.A., bug out to the south.  North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Arkansas, Texas, Louisianna, Mississippi, Maryland, Southern California, parts of New Mexico and Arizona. 
And Hawaii is the exception as always.

3. Travel light weight. 
The idea is to bugout to somewhere safe, not start a new pioneering colony.
To travel fast you must travel light.

4. Forget cars, SUVs, and trucks.
Bicycles will be the best compromised mode of transportation eventually.

5. Have a loaded handgun and a knife on your person at all times. 24/7!

6. Be friendly.
Until you have reason to not be friendly.

7. Have comfortable footwear that you can walk many many miles in.
No Life Club Posts: 2,605
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #80 on: April 25, 2020, 03:04:39 PM »
The survey they just did in NY state suggest 13% of the state population has the ‘marker for Covid 19’ and 21% in NYC. That’s really scary

The reason it's scary is because - with the extensive number of deaths and illnesses requiring hospitalization that NYC has had - only 21% of the living are producing an antibody.
Sr. Member Posts: 326
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #81 on: April 25, 2020, 07:14:38 PM »
The reason it's scary is because - with the extensive number of deaths and illnesses requiring hospitalization that NYC has had - only 21% of the living are producing an antibody.

Yes, but also because it has spread to 5x the population they ‘thought’ it had infected
No Life Club Posts: 2,605
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #82 on: April 25, 2020, 08:12:55 PM »
My understanding is that it was originally expected to spread to 80% of the population.... counting the people in hospitals, and the lives lost, it is closer to that, but probably not up the the 80% expected,  Therefore we're not done. 

With Herd Immunity - which is what we need - a vast majority of the surviving herd needs to be immune, and 21% isn't nearly enough.  (We know, for example, for a population to be free of Measles, 95% need to be immune).  Fortunately, COVID is slightly less contagious than Measles, therefore a slightly smaller percentage is required - probably close to 80%.

All is not lost though, my friends.

Social distancing is a double-edged sword - It takes longer to develop herd immunity, but the percentage of survivors of the disease becomes higher.  That's what flattening the curve is about - a flatter longer curve. 

It is easier albeit longer to traverse all the way around the range of foothills below Everest, than it is to summit and descend Everest herself.  And you and I both know that most mountaineers perish on the descent.  Think about it. 
No Life Club Posts: 1,593
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #83 on: April 26, 2020, 01:25:18 AM »
I think that there are only a few good reasons to bug out.

1. The area you live in is going to quickly become uninhabitable.
We're talking nuclear power plant meltdown, hurricanes, long term droughts, war.

Luckily, these things don't happen very often.


But there are some general rules:

1. Have a bug out plan and a rally point before the crisis hits.

2. Don't relocated to areas where it's hard to survive due to the weather and climate.
 If you're in the U.S.A., bug out to the south.  North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Arkansas, Texas, Louisianna, Mississippi, Maryland, Southern California, parts of New Mexico and Arizona. 
And Hawaii is the exception as always.

3. Travel light weight. 
The idea is to bugout to somewhere safe, not start a new pioneering colony.
To travel fast you must travel light.

4. Forget cars, SUVs, and trucks.
Bicycles will be the best compromised mode of transportation eventually.

5. Have a loaded handgun and a knife on your person at all times. 24/7!

6. Be friendly.
Until you have reason to not be friendly.

7. Have comfortable footwear that you can walk many many miles in.


There are just too many things that can happen to be able to prepare for everything. Thus I think more in terms of maximizing options. More options give more flexibility to plan and adapt if smurf happens. 

I like the option to go and live where climate is hard. Depending on the issue that can be a good idea. I like to have the option to travel heavy and not have to depend on people at the other end helping me (and everyone else likely arriving). Bicycles can be a good choice, but I also like to have the option of car, motorcycle or boat. (Or plane for that matter). Around here there is nothing a bike can do that a motorcycle wouldn't do faster and better. I can't use a hand gun to shoot virus, earthquakes or floods so I wouldn't follow that hard rule either - but I'd like the option.

In short I like options. And I don't want to limit their scope too much based on rules anticipating scenarios that might or might not fit. That said there is of course the prioritizing of resources towards whatever seems more likely - and with urgency, or lack thereof, of their seeming likelyness.

"Simple is hard"
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 8,804
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #84 on: May 05, 2020, 07:57:21 AM »
My understanding is that it was originally expected to spread to 80% of the population.... counting the people in hospitals, and the lives lost, it is closer to that, but probably not up the the 80% expected,  Therefore we're not done. 

With Herd Immunity - which is what we need - a vast majority of the surviving herd needs to be immune, and 21% isn't nearly enough.  (We know, for example, for a population to be free of Measles, 95% need to be immune).  Fortunately, COVID is slightly less contagious than Measles, therefore a slightly smaller percentage is required - probably close to 80%.

All is not lost though, my friends.

Social distancing is a double-edged sword - It takes longer to develop herd immunity, but the percentage of survivors of the disease becomes higher.  That's what flattening the curve is about - a flatter longer curve. 

It is easier albeit longer to traverse all the way around the range of foothills below Everest, than it is to summit and descend Everest herself.  And you and I both know that most mountaineers perish on the descent.  Think about it. 

Sorry to hear about your lost of friends, and am thank you for your effort to stay vigilant and practice social distancing/wear mask to keep up the fight.

1) There are two ways to attain herd immunity, either thru proper and effective vaccination or maybe potentially thru infection. 

The problem of anti-body post infection is that there are fair number of re-occurring/re-infection cases worldwide, and as Fauci stated in one of the interviews, we know not enough about the virus that we are not even sure whether you get enough anti-body after infection to prevent re-infection.  And the amount of anti-body varies on age and seriousness of infection, also how long will it stay effective is still an unknown. 

Natural herd immunity is an old method when vaccination is not possible and there is no hope in sight.  But to attain that natural herd immunity(a 60-80% of entire population immune), we are talking about literally close to 200 million infections and at that level of infection, the hospitals nation wide will be long overwhelmed and the death rate will be even high than what we see today.  Combining with real possibility of re-infection, the result will certainly be devastating and literally millions of lives will be lost in between.  That's probably why UK has abandoned that strategy early on.


2) Vaccination is not something that can be 'rushed'.  It scares me to no end when I hear politician trying to 'rush' the vaccination process.  Without a proper FDA trial or due diligence, which takes time, there is no certainty whether a vaccine is effective or not, let alone it is safe to use.  The worst is to induce false hope, and then to realize it is ineffective or may cause serious side effect.


3)  Personally, I would think the level of testing conducted in US is not nearly enough, when compared to certain region where they got huge spike but controlled it effectively(like South Korea, thru mask wearing/social distancing/contact tracing/testing).  The problem is we don't know what we don't know.  Many experts claim an effective number in US is about 5 million per day, but current level is way below that, despite  politician may claim it can be attained very soon or even surpass it.  I am not a statistician or virologist to know how the significant is threshold of 5 million, but I do know many regions that got it under control all have similar methods, and ample testing is one of them.  Fighting the pandemic without enough testing is like fighting an enemy blindfolded, we don't even know what we are doing right now has a enough positive impact or not.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2020, 08:04:17 AM by comis »

Join Daredevil Challenge in August and get Free magnets!
Comis Gear Youtube Channel
No Life Club Posts: 2,605
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #85 on: May 05, 2020, 04:53:54 PM »
Sorry to hear about your lost of friends, and am thank you for your effort to stay vigilant and practice social distancing/wear mask to keep up the fight.

1) There are two ways to attain herd immunity, either thru proper and effective vaccination or maybe potentially thru infection. 

The problem of anti-body post infection is that there are fair number of re-occurring/re-infection cases worldwide, and as Fauci stated in one of the interviews, we know not enough about the virus that we are not even sure whether you get enough anti-body after infection to prevent re-infection.  And the amount of anti-body varies on age and seriousness of infection, also how long will it stay effective is still an unknown. 

Natural herd immunity is an old method when vaccination is not possible and there is no hope in sight.  But to attain that natural herd immunity(a 60-80% of entire population immune), we are talking about literally close to 200 million infections and at that level of infection, the hospitals nation wide will be long overwhelmed and the death rate will be even high than what we see today.  Combining with real possibility of re-infection, the result will certainly be devastating and literally millions of lives will be lost in between.  That's probably why UK has abandoned that strategy early on.


2) Vaccination is not something that can be 'rushed'.  It scares me to no end when I hear politician trying to 'rush' the vaccination process.  Without a proper FDA trial or due diligence, which takes time, there is no certainty whether a vaccine is effective or not, let alone it is safe to use.  The worst is to induce false hope, and then to realize it is ineffective or may cause serious side effect.


3)  Personally, I would think the level of testing conducted in US is not nearly enough, when compared to certain region where they got huge spike but controlled it effectively(like South Korea, thru mask wearing/social distancing/contact tracing/testing).  The problem is we don't know what we don't know.  Many experts claim an effective number in US is about 5 million per day, but current level is way below that, despite  politician may claim it can be attained very soon or even surpass it.  I am not a statistician or virologist to know how the significant is threshold of 5 million, but I do know many regions that got it under control all have similar methods, and ample testing is one of them.  Fighting the pandemic without enough testing is like fighting an enemy blindfolded, we don't even know what we are doing right now has a enough positive impact or not.

Agree with you.

1.  We have no evidence that the antibody will provide "memory" of the infection, and immunity. There have been re-infections, so the thought is that it probably doesn't.  The percentage of people that need to be immune to confer herd immunity to the population varies by the degree of contagious-ness of the virus - and the number of people who are vaccinated plays into that.  For example, to keep measles out of the population, 95% must be immune, one way or another).  For COVID-19 that number is probably on the higher end of 60-80% of the population. - that translates to a lot of people that will be hospitalized for severe disease.  And again going to the problem of "memory" after infection... once they're recovered, we don't know what to expect.

2.  I agree that a vaccine is something that can not be rushed.  The current vaccines have taken years to develop. False hope is more dangerous than no hope.

3.  Only 2% of the US population has been tested for the virus itself.  We know that the nasal swab misses 30% of positive cases - it reports positives as negative.  the WHO reports that without testing 10% of the population, you can't estimate the burden of virus in the population, and properly address it.  We can't slow the spread if we don't know where the disease is.

Slowing the spread is the important thing - this will need to go from a wildfire to a smolder so that those who need medical attention can get what they need from what we have available. 
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 15,068 Yoo-hoo, big summer blowout!
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #86 on: May 05, 2020, 06:34:02 PM »

3)  Personally, I would think the level of testing conducted in US is not nearly enough, when compared to certain region where they got huge spike but controlled it effectively(like South Korea, thru mask wearing/social distancing/contact tracing/testing).  The problem is we don't know what we don't know.  Many experts claim an effective number in US is about 5 million per day, but current level is way below that, despite  politician may claim it can be attained very soon or even surpass it.  I am not a statistician or virologist to know how the significant is threshold of 5 million, but I do know many regions that got it under control all have similar methods, and ample testing is one of them.  Fighting the pandemic without enough testing is like fighting an enemy blindfolded, we don't even know what we are doing right now has a enough positive impact or not.
For what it's worth, the usa is currently doing twice as much testing per million people compared to south korea.
Far right column underneath "countries"
The difference I  was able to find is that south korea did the containment strategy right and effectively used their tests.
Everyone that was traced as coming into contact with a person that tested positive was notified and underwent 14 day quarantine, and they only tested suspected cases.

Hooked, like everyone else. ;)

All hail the hook!
No Life Club Posts: 2,605
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #87 on: May 05, 2020, 07:08:38 PM »
For what it's worth, the usa is currently doing twice as much testing per million people compared to south korea.
Far right column underneath "countries"
The difference I  was able to find is that south korea did the containment strategy right and effectively used their tests.
Everyone that was traced as coming into contact with a person that tested positive was notified and underwent 14 day quarantine, and they only tested suspected cases.

That's an important point too.  Depending on how strict a country is with quarantines and lockdowns, as well as contact tracing, they may need more or less widespread testing. In the US we don't have strict containment strategies as they did in... say... Singapore.

It's on a spectrum.  If every human in the world completely isolates themselves for 14 days (assuming they don't shed virus for longer than that, which has proven erroneous)... strictly... all at once... Not a single step outside their room.  This could have been stopped in 2, maybe 3 weeks.  The moment millions of people take a small bit of leeway, this drags out, and testing and contact tracing becomes more necessary.  If a particular area want's to make their own blend of a containment strategy they must take more from Bucket B (testing) if they don't want to take from Bucket A (isolation).  As lockdowns become more unrestricted in the US, unless they ramp up to many more people getting tested (and remember the swab is missing 30% of cases)... we're going to be in a heap of trouble. 
No Life Club Posts: 2,090 I have a small selection of disparate tools
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #88 on: May 05, 2020, 08:25:43 PM »

 We know that the nasal swab misses 30% of positive cases - it reports positives as negative..

Interesting. Do you have a reference for this please ? I haven't seen this stat before.:tu:

It is never too late to be what you might have been - George Eliot
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 15,068 Yoo-hoo, big summer blowout!
Re: The reality of bugging out.
« Reply #89 on: May 05, 2020, 08:55:00 PM »
:ahhh
Just found out what the swab test looks like. :dwts:
And some government officials are saying they're getting it regularly?  :o :dwts:

Hooked, like everyone else. ;)

All hail the hook!

 

Donations

Operational Funds

Help us keep the Unworkable working!
Donate with PayPal!
May Goal: $300.00
Due Date: May 31
Total Receipts: $79.60
PayPal Fees: $5.65
Net Balance: $73.95
Below Goal: $226.05
Site Currency: USD
25% 
May Donations

Community Links


Powered by EzPortal
SMF 2.0.17 | SMF © 2020, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.049 seconds with 33 queries.
© 2018 Defender Web & Tool