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Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review 1194

Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« on: July 18, 2020, 07:52:29 AM »
With several models under their brand, each with its own unique design and appeal, Roxon should need no introduction by now. Daring designs, unique features, good quality, and great value. Does the Phantom live up to the Roxon name? Let's see.



Dimensions and other info
Show content
Length: 4.09" (10.4cm)
Width: 1.65" (42mm)
Thickness: 0.78" (20mm)
Tool weight: 11oz (313g).
Tool and sheath: 12.5oz (352g)

Handle fasteners: Torx 8

Wire-cutter material: Tungsten alloy
Wire-cutter fasteners: Torx 8

Blade material: 5cr15Mov
Blade length (tanto) : 3.07" (2.32" + 0.75") = 78mm (59mm + 19mm)
Saw cutting length: 2.75" (70mm)
Scissor material: 5cr15Mov
Scissors cutting edge: 1.57" (40mm)
Chisel cutting edge: 0.25" (6.5mm)

Price at time of review: $49.90
Warranty: 10 Years

Roxon is an own branding team under Chamfun Industrial Co. Ltd.


Implement List
Show content
Pliers; spring-loaded (hidden spring), needle-nose
Wire-cutters; replaceable, tungsten alloy
Scissors; spring-loaded, adjustable pivot, rounded tips, handle locking in both open and closed position
Blade; one-handed, tanto (default), plain-edge, hollow grind, liner-lock, removable, replaceable
Saw; one-handed (left hand), wood, bi-directional, liner-lock
Can-opener; quarter-circle
Flathead; 2.5mm
Reamerpunch
Phillips #2;
Chisel
Wire-strippers
Metric scale; 9cm




Features
Show content
All locking tools
Detachable handle scale, to remove blade
Replaceable wire-cutters
One-handed operation for everything except scissors

Sheath
Extra pair of wire-cutters
Torx 8 L-wrench


The tool comes in a cardboard box, which fits in a cardboard half-box. Included are a nylon sheath, T8 L-wrench, an extra pair of wire-cutters, and instructions.

The sheath fits the tool well. Single-stitched, snap button, both vertical and horizontal carry. Quite decent.


Ready to use with no opening required is the metric scale. It measures 9 centimeters and it is flawlessly engraved onto the handle. Very easy to read, and thanks to the blade sinking flush with the handle, the tool sits perfectly flat, allowing the scale to be placed on surfaces for easy measuring and drawing lines. It also offers some traction when using other implements.


The Phantom comes with a tanto blade by default. While folded, it is countersunk into the handle, improving ergonomics for other tools. Retention when closed is excellent. The thumb-hole is placed and ground perfectly for one-handed deployment. The action is smooth and intuitive. It locks with a liner-lock at 40%, and has no play. It was properly sharpened with a hollow grind, and cut beautifully. Almost mirror-polished, it collects fingerprints, but cleans up very easily.
Performance was excellent. Paired with great ergonomics, the blade cut through various materials with ease. The tanto profile offers great utility, with a robust tip and a secondary tip for draw-cuts.


Pushing the two switches back reveals the main selling point. The scale detaches and the blade can be removed. This alone would be great, as it would help with maintenance, or even make the tool bladeless if needed. But wait, there's more. The tanto blade can be swapped out for a vast array of profiles. Drop-point, talon, spear-point, fully serrated, even a box-cutter. An excellent feature, the replaceable blades can address different needs and preferences, eliminate redundancy in your edc load-out, or even allow the use of a removed blade. The spear-point blade makes a decent spear point or even arrowhead, and it is better to baton with the detached blade rather than have it in the multi-tool.

Two tiny holes in the scale provide access to the pivot screws, without the need to detach the scale. The two protruding screws hold the scale and liner together, to store the latch mechanism.


Additional blades are available, in many profiles. When installed, they all lock just as solidly, and deploy beautifully. Their transparent, hard plastic storage cases are very well thought-out. Blades are kept in place by friction, and by a ball detent that protrudes in their pivot hole. A loop swivels and clips firmly, and a switch locks it in place. Quite a secure set-up. The cases also have magnets, which allow them to stack onto each other, as well as attach to ferrous surfaces. They are also interchangeable. Any case can hold any blade.


In the other handle, there is a woodsaw. It opens one-handed, with the left hand, and also locks firmly with a liner-lock. The spine is thinner than the teeth, to reduce binding. The teeth are properly aggressive and work very well on wood and plastic. The spine can also scrape, thanks to its 90° edges.


Next to the saw, we find the shorter implements, a can opener with flat-head tip, a reamer, a Phillips driver, and a chisel with wire-stripper notches.
All sit flush into the handle. Pushing the switch forward partially deploys them. They clump together, but it is easy to select and open just one, even one-handed, with either hand. All four lock solidly. To unlock, push the switch back.


The can opener is a quarter-circle, and worked adequately. While it engages on the can properly, tracing around the lid was not easy. With each cut, the edge slid across the lid ever so slightly before cutting, so after a few cuts, the cut was too far away from the rim to continue. A new cut had to be started every few steps. Going backwards eliminated this problem and was much faster, though either way, there were some sharp edges left behind. Thankfully, ergonomics are excellent, and it never slipped off the rim.
The edge is also noted as a "pry bar for cans". As true as it is, that was arguably not necessary to put on the box. That's marketing for you.
The flathead screwdriver tip fits screws well, but is on the thin side, and reach is compromised by the can opener edge.


The reamer is long, well sharpened, and pointy. Piercing, drilling, reaming, it does everything well. Again, this is a little thin for heavy work, and rests against a stop pin rather than the handle, so caution must be used.


The Phillips is well formed, and offers decent reach, but is flat. It bit into #2 screws very well, and showed no signs of wear turning screws, although its thin profile prohibits heavy use. It can also turn #1 screws, but does not engage that deeply in those.


The chisel is a nice and rather uncommon addition in a multi-tool. It was nicely sharpened and scraped wonderfully. It even has a nail-slit, to avoid deploying it from the sharpened end. The wire-stripper notches are perfectly ground and sharpened, and stripped wire very easily.



To access the pliers, the handles can be opened both as a regular butterfly multi-tool, or whipped, like a balisong. This is possible thanks to the liner ball detents, not unlike how retention works when a liner-lock blade is closed. The action is smooth and the handles click into place solidly.


Spring-loaded, needle-nose, and with replaceable wire-cutters. The tips meet to a nice point. The teeth are sharply defined, and grab excellently. Ergonomics are superb, thanks to rounded edges and minimal handle splay. The wire-cutters are replaceable, and replacements are included with the tool, along with the L key to remove them.


And of course, we have scissors. To deploy them, unfold the handle, then press the button to unlock them, and swing them open. The handle will lock when fully unfolded as well.
The scissors cut phenomenally well, without jamming, crimping material, or pushing material away. Just about everything about them is perfect; tolerances, ergonomics, spring return, sharpening, pivot action, bevel angle, blade thickness, cutting edge length, handle leverage. Outstanding.
To fold back in, press the button to unlock the handle.



Construction Quality
Looking at this multi-tool, there are several points of interest, construction-wise. The blade release system, the scissor handle lock, the short implement deployment and unlocking switch, the plier detents. It is almost mind-blowing that every single aspect of this tool has been executed as well as it has.
The blade deploys and locks perfectly, even though the entire scale can detach. Swapping a blade for another requires no tools and takes only a few seconds, and the new blade deploys and locks perfectly as well.
The scissor handle locks perfectly too, with zero play, both in the folded and unfolded position. Not entirely necessary one might argue, but a better feature that a cut-out back-spring.
The short implement switch works wonderfully to deploy and unlock them. Even with only the left hand, it was remarkably easy to do.
The liner ball detents that hold the pliers in place are an excellent way to achieve one-handed access.
It is no wonder the Phantom was granted four utility patents.

In addition to all the new engineering feats, pretty much everything on this tool has been done right. Employing industrial level fine-blanking to achieve precision and structural integrity, the results speak for themselves. Edges are expertly chamfered, everything pivots smoothly, all implements are precisely shaped and finished, tolerances are on spot, the sharps are properly sharpened, all locking systems work as intended.
It is refreshing to see this level of quality in such an ambitious design. Engineering challenges were solved brilliantly, without compromising features, or creating new issues.



Design
Almost all grey, and with no daring features to break its lines and color scheme, the tool looks rather plain, with its dull metallic frame, rounded corners and edges, and few soft lines and shallow dimples. A nice touch is the scissors pictogram, which is formed by two lines gently curving towards each other at the ends. Possibly the most elegant way to have a pictogram that is decorative as well as non-obtrusive.
A quick glance betrays the sophisticated design of this tool. Looking closely, things start coming to the surface. Implements are countersunk to improve ergonomics. Pivot screws that would have been covered by the removable scale can be accessed without removing the scale. The scissors disappear behind the pliers. Liners provide the detent to the handles, making the pliers one-handed. Pushing two switches back releases the scale and blades can be swapped around in seconds. Its modest looks are outshined by its marvelous compactness, versatility, ease of access, and efficiency.



Performance
Everything on this tool performed as well or better than expected. This is what happens when a great design meets great execution. Everything works properly. Tolerances are excellent. The tools lock solidly and are properly shaped to accomplish their tasks. Emphasis was given to the tool's ergonomics, with rounded edges, countersunk implements, and low profile switches. Accessibility was also a priority, with one-handed pliers, blade, saw, and shorter implements. The oversized scissors are undoubtedly a main feature and they once again dominated, but the selling point was arguably the blade, or rather, blades. Not only does the default tanto blade perform exceptionally well, but it can be swapped with an impressive list of profiles. Multi-tool blades are commonly a major priority for users, and with brands other than the big four, it is always a coin toss whether the blade will be usable, or barely so. Well, with this tool, there are no concerns. The blades are a cut above.
The shorter implements did their part, but all four are quite thin. This does not matter al that much for the chisel and to some extent, the reamer, but the drivers may have trouble with stubborn screws.



Conclusion
The Phantom is a product of hard work, and it shows. Being granted five patents for a multi-tool does not happen every day. Deceptively modest in appearance, it is a first-rate example of cutting-edge design and engineering precision. Although it follows the basic elements of the Storm, its features have been designed from the ground up. The main attraction was undoubtedly the replaceable blade system, which was executed flawlessly, and Roxon did not stop there. Ergonomics and accessibility were also given priority, all the while keeping an impressive level of quality.

For a small brand that only recently entered the multi-tool world, Roxon has yet again proven their determination, ingenuity, and engineering prowess. Not only does the tool look nice, it also performs well, while having unique features. It is very promising to see such commitment to building their next offering even better and so different than the last. The Phantom is not a simple update to the Storm, but rather, a spiritual successor and an evolution of the Storm. Roxon went out of their way to improve on the design, changed various features, added new ones, and ultimately, released an excellent multi-tool. To compliment it, they also released a folding knife that can accommodate the various blades with the same elegance as the Phantom. Even the blade cases are well thought-out.

The Phantom is not just a nice multi-tool. It is proof that Roxon cares. This is their in-house design, and they keep improving upon it. They listened to feedback and they made many adjustments and improvements. To top it all, they added many details and new features, the main being a blade that is ridiculously easy to remove and replace, along with a plethora of options, and a dedicated folding knife to go along. Taking everything into account, one cannot help but wonder what the future holds for Roxon.



Pros
-Interchangeable blade system
   -Easier to clean, or make the tool bladeless
   -Many different blade options
   -Blades fit Phantasy folding knife
-Excellent build quality
-Great ergonomics
-Great accessibility, with one-handed pliers and all tools, except the scissors.
-Great deal, with tool, extra wire-cutters, Torx wrench, and sheath.

Cons
-Medium duty drivers
-Keeping an additional blade in its case with the multi-tool can magnetize it.
-Blades collect fingerprints



Thoughts
-The Phantasy comes with a drop-point, and the Phantom with the tanto, so that if you buy both, you are not stuck with two of the same. Nice.
-Replaceable blades are fantastic. Why not go the extra mile, and offer more profiles, like a blunt-tipped curved rescue blade, different grinds, like a drop-point scandi, and different materials, like 14C28, 154CM, S30V, even damascus.
-The box-cutter is an amazing addition. Why not also a scalpel holder, or a t-shank jigsaw holder?
-If the Phillips was square shank, it could accommodate the bit adapter and boost the tool's versatility even further.
-The Phillips could be a hair narrower, so that, when opened with the reamer, they could accommodate the bit adapter. The reamer would have to be the same length.
 -Alternatively, remove the chisel, put the awl in its place, and make the Phillips square, so it fits the bit adapter. The wire-stripper notches can fit on the can opener.
-It is excellent that replacement wire-cutters and a wrench are included. It would be even better if extra screws were included too.


Reviews of the other tools in the series
Roxon KS S501
Roxon MBT3 S601
Roxon Storm S801
Roxon Storm S801S 30 Day Challenge
« Last Edit: July 18, 2020, 08:41:08 AM by ReamerPunch »

Sr. Member Posts: 435
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2020, 09:44:41 AM »
Great review as always!  :cheers:

It seems like a fantastic multitool and it's great to see in house innovation from a company like this!

How are you liking the dedicated knife that uses the same blade system and if you don't mind me asking, how much did each run you (and from where)?
Newbie Posts: 44
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2020, 06:39:55 PM »
Mine just turned up today. I bought the MT and the knife but did not buy any blades yet. Amazon UK have them did cost me £49 for the tool and £19 for the knife. Was thinking to do a review myself but yours is far better what I would have done. I own the perv model 801 and this seems to be a nice upgrade. I didn't have much time using it yet only tested the blade swap between the tool and the pocket knife. The only cons so far is the scale looked plastic to me at the first look. Not sure if its alloy or plastic. Seems to be a well thought out system time will tell how got they are in real life use, also want to see the advertised blades to be available (can only buy 3 variants atm)

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Phantom-Scissors-Replaceable-Cutters-Innovative/dp/B08745F43Q/ref=sr_1_6?dchild=1&keywords=roxon&qid=1595090364&sr=8-6
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2020, 06:32:01 AM »
Thanks guys! :cheers:
The tool is also available in another website for $49.90, but I think we are not allowed to link to it. :think:
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2020, 06:33:40 AM »
The only cons so far is the scale looked plastic to me at the first look. Not sure if its alloy or plastic.

It's aluminium
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2020, 06:41:17 AM »
The knife is also nice. I only made a few references to it, so I may review it separately.
Overall, good size, good weight, looks nice. Only tip-down is a bit of a bummer.
Comfortable in hand, but only three-finger grip due to the finger choil being a little low. But I like it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWJ3Flk_Ek0&t
Newbie Posts: 44
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2020, 08:44:47 PM »
The knife is also nice. I only made a few references to it, so I may review it separately.
Overall, good size, good weight, looks nice. Only tip-down is a bit of a bummer.
Comfortable in hand, but only three-finger grip due to the finger choil being a little low. But I like it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWJ3Flk_Ek0&t

When you changing the blade from the tool it becomes useless, unable to open it one hand due to the cut out on the tools blade. That was the whole point for me buying both, so its a minus from me.
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #8 on: July 22, 2020, 01:04:33 PM »
The tanto blade has a slit, whereas the other blades have thumb-holes. But the tanto still works in the Phantasy. The slit is not perfectly positioned compared to when it is in the multi-tool, but I did try it in the Phantasy and I could open it just fine.
Jr. Member Posts: 87
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #9 on: July 22, 2020, 06:30:59 PM »
Do the blades fit in the older Roxon KS501 (obviously you need tools to take this one apart)? I'd love to have a box cutter with the scissors.
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #10 on: July 24, 2020, 09:32:26 AM »
 :think:


This pic was released to tease the Phantom and Phantasy, and maybe something else? :think:



The first tool is the Phantasy of course, then the Phantom. The third is a multi-tool that does not match with any side of the Phantom, and looks slimmer than the Phantom as well. I may be spoiling a surprise here, but there may be a third tool we have yet to see. :ahhh

Jr. Member Posts: 97
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #11 on: July 24, 2020, 10:13:53 AM »
:think:


This pic was released to tease the Phantom and Phantasy, and maybe something else? :think:
(Image removed from quote.)


The first tool is the Phantasy of course, then the Phantom. The third is a multi-tool that does not match with any side of the Phantom, and looks slimmer than the Phantom as well. I may be spoiling a surprise here, but there may be a third tool we have yet to see. :ahhh


It could be the Flash S803, a more camping oriented one with it's flintstone
Currently on Indiegogo but not yet on the official website of Roxon

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/flash-s803-a-multitool-designed-for-outdoor/coming_soon




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Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #12 on: July 24, 2020, 10:28:57 AM »



So, I was right! :ahhh It looks really nice. A shame it does not fit the interchangeable blades, but still, wow! :cheers:
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #14 on: July 24, 2020, 10:43:57 AM »
Maybe it is supposed to replace the Spark? It has all the same tools, plus a ruler.
Jr. Member Posts: 87
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #15 on: July 25, 2020, 01:38:24 PM »
Do the blades fit in the older Roxon KS501 (obviously you need tools to take this one apart)? I'd love to have a box cutter with the scissors.
I received my S502 Phantasy today, so in case someone is wondering, the answer is probably yes, but it will require a bit of work on the blade. I'm planning to try it once the utility knife option becomes available. Coupled with the monster scissors this would be the ultimate office tool. Of course, if Roxon were to release a version with scissors, it would be even better.
Hero Member Posts: 545
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #16 on: July 26, 2020, 03:29:40 PM »
    I got one yesterday and I am pretty impressed with it! Here are my first impressions. I also own a S801, so I can compare it to that one!

The good?
1. This has to be the most well designed multitool in my arsenal when it comes to comfort in hand. The size is perfect for my hands, and everything is very well rounded on the handle. The 801 was very good in this regard, but the 802 improves upon it!
2. The blade is larger than the 801. It looks like it would handle more heavy duty jobs, and of course, is easy replaceable.
3. All tools lock and  easily deploy. The pliers also very smoothly deploy and fold up.
4. Awesome scissors, just like the 801, and the 802 improves upon the way they deploy.
5. The 802's saw locks

The bad?
1. The Philips driver on the 802 is a BIG step down from the 801. I am not a big fan of 2D philips drivers.  You can actually put a bit adapter over the Philips driver, and it stays there without a lot of wiggle, but it looks like it would snap if any real pressure is put on it. I have a spare adapter, and will carefully use it. Despite the apparent weakness in the driver, this still makes a pretty big improvement.

The meh!?
1. I would rather have a bottle opener than a can opener. The only thing I use can openers on multitools for, is to pry watch backs open, and other minor jobs like that.
2. Going from the 801 to the 802, we also lose the file, glass breaker, and the corkscrew. I can do without the corkscrew, but a file is handy at times.


   Anyhow, that is my 2 cents! I may have to use this thing over the next few weeks to see how it does helping me with duties around the house and yard. I am glad I added it to my collection!


PS: Awesome review by the way!!  :salute: :tu:

 
Sr. Member Posts: 388
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #17 on: July 28, 2020, 02:33:52 AM »
Awesome review! I have a Storm on the way...I’m just waiting for a good price on the Phantom. Though it’s going to be a bit redundant, I’m thinking of getting this one as a ‘trophy to innovation’ of sorts.
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #18 on: August 01, 2020, 11:30:15 AM »
I received my S502 Phantasy today, so in case someone is wondering, the answer is probably yes, but it will require a bit of work on the blade. I'm planning to try it once the utility knife option becomes available. Coupled with the monster scissors this would be the ultimate office tool. Of course, if Roxon were to release a version with scissors, it would be even better.

That would compliment any multi-tool wonderfully. Of course, if the Phantasy had the scissors, then there would be no reason to buy the KS. And since the Phantom and Phantasy take the same set of blades, it makes sense that people would carry both, so why put scissors on both?

Then again, the Phantasy could come with or without the scissors. The Flash does not have scissors. We could carry the Phantasy with scissors and the Flash.
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #19 on: August 01, 2020, 11:36:37 AM »
Awesome review! I have a Storm on the way...I’m just waiting for a good price on the Phantom. Though it’s going to be a bit redundant, I’m thinking of getting this one as a ‘trophy to innovation’ of sorts.

Thanks!  :cheers:
This was very interesting to review. Usually you have a lot to say then a tool is bad. With a good tool, reviews tend to be shorter. But the Phantom is so innovative and well done, I had quite a lot to say. It is a very tactile tool, though. Written reviews will not capture the feeling you get when handling it.

I bought some multi-tools as a ‘trophy to innovation’ myself, kind of the milestones of the multi-tool evolution, like the PST, Gerber MP, BuckTool, Schrade ToughTool, Bear & Son etc.
Jr. Member Posts: 87
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #20 on: August 01, 2020, 12:35:06 PM »
That would compliment any multi-tool wonderfully. Of course, if the Phantasy had the scissors, then there would be no reason to buy the KS. And since the Phantom and Phantasy take the same set of blades, it makes sense that people would carry both, so why put scissors on both?

Then again, the Phantasy could come with or without the scissors. The Flash does not have scissors. We could carry the Phantasy with scissors and the Flash.
Even better, Roxon could make a knife with detachable scissors, like the tool you found here. Seeing how they're going for modularity (replaceable cutters and blades), that doesn't seem impossible. 2021 will tell...
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #21 on: August 01, 2020, 12:55:00 PM »
Even better, Roxon could make a knife with detachable scissors, like the tool you found here. Seeing how they're going for modularity (replaceable cutters and blades), that doesn't seem impossible. 2021 will tell...

 :like:
Removable scissors on the KS/Phantasy would be nice, but they're not that heavy to use anyway. Removable scissors on the Phantom/Storm would be fantastic. The Storm is a little heavy and makes the scissors a little awkward to use.
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Global Moderator Just Bananas Posts: 61,266
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #23 on: August 20, 2020, 03:52:04 AM »
Really excellent review, RP :like:
Global Moderator Abandon All Hope Ye Who Enter Here... Posts: 48,637
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #24 on: August 23, 2020, 05:23:26 PM »
 :iagree: :tu:
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #25 on: August 29, 2020, 02:33:48 PM »
Thanks, guys! :cheers:
It took three sets of pictures to get a few to look decent enough to post, and hours of proof-reading.
But I enjoyed all of it. The Phantom is a great multi-tool. :like:
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #27 on: September 06, 2020, 03:45:29 AM »
With several models under their brand, each with its own unique design and appeal, Roxon should need no introduction by now. Daring designs, unique features, good quality, and great value. Does the Phantom live up to the Roxon name? Let's see.



Dimensions and other info
Show content
Length: 4.09" (10.4cm)
Width: 1.65" (42mm)
Thickness: 0.78" (20mm)
Tool weight: 11oz (313g).
Tool and sheath: 12.5oz (352g)

Handle fasteners: Torx 8

Wire-cutter material: Tungsten alloy
Wire-cutter fasteners: Torx 8

Blade material: 5cr15Mov
Blade length (tanto) : 3.07" (2.32" + 0.75") = 78mm (59mm + 19mm)
Saw cutting length: 2.75" (70mm)
Scissor material: 5cr15Mov
Scissors cutting edge: 1.57" (40mm)
Chisel cutting edge: 0.25" (6.5mm)

Price at time of review: $49.90
Warranty: 10 Years

Roxon is an own branding team under Chamfun Industrial Co. Ltd.


Implement List
Show content
Pliers; spring-loaded (hidden spring), needle-nose
Wire-cutters; replaceable, tungsten alloy
Scissors; spring-loaded, adjustable pivot, rounded tips, handle locking in both open and closed position
Blade; one-handed, tanto (default), plain-edge, hollow grind, liner-lock, removable, replaceable
Saw; one-handed (left hand), wood, bi-directional, liner-lock
Can-opener; quarter-circle
Flathead; 2.5mm
Reamerpunch
Phillips #2;
Chisel
Wire-strippers
Metric scale; 9cm




Features
Show content
All locking tools
Detachable handle scale, to remove blade
Replaceable wire-cutters
One-handed operation for everything except scissors

Sheath
Extra pair of wire-cutters
Torx 8 L-wrench


The tool comes in a cardboard box, which fits in a cardboard half-box. Included are a nylon sheath, T8 L-wrench, an extra pair of wire-cutters, and instructions.

The sheath fits the tool well. Single-stitched, snap button, both vertical and horizontal carry. Quite decent.


Ready to use with no opening required is the metric scale. It measures 9 centimeters and it is flawlessly engraved onto the handle. Very easy to read, and thanks to the blade sinking flush with the handle, the tool sits perfectly flat, allowing the scale to be placed on surfaces for easy measuring and drawing lines. It also offers some traction when using other implements.


The Phantom comes with a tanto blade by default. While folded, it is countersunk into the handle, improving ergonomics for other tools. Retention when closed is excellent. The thumb-hole is placed and ground perfectly for one-handed deployment. The action is smooth and intuitive. It locks with a liner-lock at 40%, and has no play. It was properly sharpened with a hollow grind, and cut beautifully. Almost mirror-polished, it collects fingerprints, but cleans up very easily.
Performance was excellent. Paired with great ergonomics, the blade cut through various materials with ease. The tanto profile offers great utility, with a robust tip and a secondary tip for draw-cuts.


Pushing the two switches back reveals the main selling point. The scale detaches and the blade can be removed. This alone would be great, as it would help with maintenance, or even make the tool bladeless if needed. But wait, there's more. The tanto blade can be swapped out for a vast array of profiles. Drop-point, talon, spear-point, fully serrated, even a box-cutter. An excellent feature, the replaceable blades can address different needs and preferences, eliminate redundancy in your edc load-out, or even allow the use of a removed blade. The spear-point blade makes a decent spear point or even arrowhead, and it is better to baton with the detached blade rather than have it in the multi-tool.

Two tiny holes in the scale provide access to the pivot screws, without the need to detach the scale. The two protruding screws hold the scale and liner together, to store the latch mechanism.


Additional blades are available, in many profiles. When installed, they all lock just as solidly, and deploy beautifully. Their transparent, hard plastic storage cases are very well thought-out. Blades are kept in place by friction, and by a ball detent that protrudes in their pivot hole. A loop swivels and clips firmly, and a switch locks it in place. Quite a secure set-up. The cases also have magnets, which allow them to stack onto each other, as well as attach to ferrous surfaces. They are also interchangeable. Any case can hold any blade.


In the other handle, there is a woodsaw. It opens one-handed, with the left hand, and also locks firmly with a liner-lock. The spine is thinner than the teeth, to reduce binding. The teeth are properly aggressive and work very well on wood and plastic. The spine can also scrape, thanks to its 90o edges.


Next to the saw, we find the shorter implements, a can opener with flat-head tip, a reamer, a Phillips driver, and a chisel with wire-stripper notches.
All sit flush into the handle. Pushing the switch forward partially deploys them. They clump together, but it is easy to select and open just one, even one-handed, with either hand. All four lock solidly. To unlock, push the switch back.


The can opener is a quarter-circle, and worked adequately. While it engages on the can properly, tracing around the lid was not easy. With each cut, the edge slid across the lid ever so slightly before cutting, so after a few cuts, the cut was too far away from the rim to continue. A new cut had to be started every few steps. Going backwards eliminated this problem and was much faster, though either way, there were some sharp edges left behind. Thankfully, ergonomics are excellent, and it never slipped off the rim.
The edge is also noted as a "pry bar for cans". As true as it is, that was arguably not necessary to put on the box. That's marketing for you.
The flathead screwdriver tip fits screws well, but is on the thin side, and reach is compromised by the can opener edge.


The reamer is long, well sharpened, and pointy. Piercing, drilling, reaming, it does everything well. Again, this is a little thin for heavy work, and rests against a stop pin rather than the handle, so caution must be used.


The Phillips is well formed, and offers decent reach, but is flat. It bit into #2 screws very well, and showed no signs of wear turning screws, although its thin profile prohibits heavy use. It can also turn #1 screws, but does not engage that deeply in those.


The chisel is a nice and rather uncommon addition in a multi-tool. It was nicely sharpened and scraped wonderfully. It even has a nail-slit, to avoid deploying it from the sharpened end. The wire-stripper notches are perfectly ground and sharpened, and stripped wire very easily.



To access the pliers, the handles can be both opened as a regular butterfly multi-tool, or whipped, like a balisong. This is possible thanks to the liner ball detents, not unlike how retention works when a liner-lock blade is closed. The action is smooth and the handles click into place solidly.
Spring-loaded, needle-nose, and with replaceable wire-cutters. The tips meet to a nice point. The teeth are sharply defined, and grab excellently. Ergonomics are superb, thanks to rounded edges and minimal handle splay. The wire-cutters are replaceable, and replacements are included with the tool, along with the L key to remove them.


And of course, we have scissors. To deploy them, unfold the handle, then press the button to unlock them, and swing them open. The handle will lock when fully unfolded as well.
The scissors cut phenomenally well, without jamming, crimping material, or pushing material away. Just about everything about them is perfect; tolerances, ergonomics, spring return, sharpening, pivot action, bevel angle, blade thickness, cutting edge length, handle leverage. Outstanding.
To fold back in, press the button to unlock the handle.



Construction Quality
Looking at this multi-tool, there are several points of interest, construction-wise. The blade release system, the scissor handle lock, the short implement deployment and unlocking switch, the plier detents. It is almost mind-blowing that every single aspect of this tool has been executed as well as it has.
The blade deploys and locks perfectly, even though the entire scale can detach. Swapping a blade for another requires no tools and takes only a few seconds, and the new blade deploys and locks perfectly as well.
The scissor handle locks perfectly too, with zero play, both in the folded and unfolded position. Not entirely necessary one might argue, but a better feature that a cut-out back-spring.
The short implement switch works wonderfully to deploy and unlock them. Even with only the left hand, it was remarkably easy to do.
The liner ball detents that hold the pliers in place are an excellent way to achieve one-handed access.

In addition to all the new engineering feats, pretty much everything on this tool has been done right. Employing industrial level fine-blanking to achieve precision and structural integrity. Edges are expertly chamfered, everything pivots smoothly, all implements are precisely shaped and finished, tolerances are on spot, the sharps are properly sharpened, all locking systems work as intended.
It is refreshing to see this level of quality in such an ambitious design. Engineering challenges were solved brilliantly, without compromising features, or creating new issues.



Design
Almost all grey, and with no daring features to break its lines and color scheme, the tool looks rather plain, with its dull metallic frame, rounded corners and edges, and few soft lines and shallow dimples. A nice touch is the scissors pictogram, which is formed by two lines gently curving towards each other at the ends. Possibly the most elegant way to have a pictogram that is decorative as well as non-obtrusive.
A quick glance betrays the sophisticated design of this tool. Looking closely, things start coming to the surface. Implements are countersunk to improve ergonomics. Pivot screws that would have been covered by the removable scale can be accessed without removing the scale. The scissors disappear behind the pliers. Liners provide the detent to the handles, making the pliers one-handed. Pushing two switches back releases the scale and blades can be swapped around in seconds. Its modest looks are outshined by its marvelous compactness, versatility, ease of access, and efficiency.



Performance
Everything on this tool performed as well or better than expected. This is what happens when a great design meets great execution. Everything works properly. Tolerances are excellent. The tools lock solidly and are properly shaped to accomplish their tasks. Emphasis was given to the tool's ergonomics, with rounded edges, countersunk implements, and low profile switches. Accessibility was also a priority, with one-handed pliers, blade, saw, and shorter implements. The oversized scissors are undoubtedly a main feature and they once again dominated, but the selling point was arguably the blade, or rather, blades. In addition to the default tanto blade performing exceptionally well, it can also be swapped with an impressive list of profiles. Multi-tool blades are commonly a major priority for users, and with brands other than the big four, it is always a coin toss whether the blade will be usable, or barely so. Well, with this tool, there are no concerns. The blades are a cut above.
The shorter implements did their part, but all four are quite thin. This does not matter al that much for the chisel and to some extent, the reamer, but the drivers will not survive stubborn screws.



Conclusion
The Phantom is a product of hard work, and it shows. Being granted five patents for a multi-tool does not happen every day. Deceptively modest in appearance, it is a first-rate example of cutting-edge design and engineering precision. Although it follows the basic elements of the Storm, its features have been designed from the ground up. The main attraction was undoubtedly the replaceable blade system, which was executed flawlessly, and Roxon did not stop there. Ergonomics and accessibility were also given priority, all the while keeping an impressive level of quality.

For a small brand that only recently entered the multi-tool world, Roxon has yet again proven their determination, ingenuity, and engineering prowess. Not only does the tool look nice, it also performs well, while having unique features. It is very promising to see such commitment to building their next offering even better and so different than the last. The Phantom is not a simple update to the Storm, but rather, a spiritual successor and an evolution of the Storm. Roxon went out of their way to improve on the design, changed various features, added new ones, and ultimately, released an excellent multi-tool. To compliment it, they also released a folding knife that can accommodate the various blades with the same elegance as the Phantom. Even the blade cases are well thought-out.

The Phantom is not just a nice multi-tool. It is proof that Roxon cares. This is their in-house design, and they keep improving upon it. They listened to feedback and they made many adjustments and improvements. To top it all, they added many details and new features, the main being a blade that is ridiculously easy to remove and replace, along with a plethora of options, and a dedicated folding knife to go along. Taking everything into account, one cannot help but wonder what the future holds for Roxon.



Pros
-Interchangeable blade system
 -Easier to clean, or make the tool bladeless
 -Many different blade options
 -Blades fit Phantasy folding knife
-Excellent build quality
-Great ergonomics
-Great accessibility, with one-handed pliers and all tools, except the scissors.
-Great deal, with tool, extra wire-cutters, Torx wrench, and sheath.

Cons
-Medium duty drivers
-Can opener is adequate, but will take some getting used to.
-Keeping an additional blade in its case with the multi-tool can magnetize it.
-Blades collect fingerprints



Thoughts
-The Phantasy comes with a drop-point, and the Phantom with the tanto, so that if you buy both, you are not stuck with two of the same. Nice.
-Replaceable blades are fantastic. Why not go the extra mile, and offer more profiles, like a blunt-tipped curved rescue blade, different grinds, like a drop-point scandi, and different materials, like 14C28, 154CM, S30V, even damascus.
-The box-cutter is an amazing addition. Why not also a scalpel holder, or a t-shank jigsaw holder?
-If the Phillips was square shank, it could accommodate the bit adapter and boost the tool's versatility even further.
-The Phillips could be a hair narrower, so that, when opened with the reamer, they could accommodate the bit adapter. The reamer would have to be the same length.
 -Alternatively, remove the chisel, put the awl in its place, and make the Phillips square, so it fits the bit adapter. The wire-stripper notches can fit on the can opener.
-It is excellent that replacement wire-cutters and a wrench are included. It would be even better if extra screws were included too.


Reviews of the other tools in the series
Roxon KS S501
Roxon MBT3 S601
Roxon Storm S801
Roxon Storm S801S 30 Day Challenge
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Re: Roxon Phantom S802 Multi-tool Review
« Reply #28 on: October 02, 2020, 04:22:43 AM »
I made a dedicated thread for the Flash S803.
https://forum.multitool.org/index.php/topic,85659.0.html
« Last Edit: October 02, 2020, 05:05:36 AM by ReamerPunch »


 

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