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Axe sharpening advice

ca Offline Grant Lamontagne

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Axe sharpening advice
on: July 21, 2021, 01:07:22 PM
Last weekend we went camping at an overcrowded Campground and I unfortunately managed to whack my SOG Base Camp axe off a bit of concrete I had under the block I was using as a chopping block.  Now there are some nasty dings in the edge.

Well, nasty to me, but could easily be smoothed out with a file and leave no permanent marks.

Anyways, I would normally just sharpen it like a large knife, and if necessary, put it on a belt sander or grinder if it's bad and needs to be reshaped...

But, I'm not 100% certain that is the right method, so I'd like to hear how everyone else is doing it.

Def
Leave the dents as they are- let your belongings show their scars as proudly as you do yours.


gb Offline Fuzzbucket

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Re: Axe sharpening advice
Reply #1 on: July 21, 2021, 01:14:07 PM
I normally just use a metal file - it's amazing how much stock you can remove once you've got it anchored nicely. Occasionally, I've used a belt sander when it's pretty bad, like I've hit a stone or something - the horizontal ones are okay and do quite a clean job.

Anyway... enter Nix waving his arms...  :ahhh


nz Offline Syncop8r

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Re: Axe sharpening advice
Reply #2 on: July 21, 2021, 01:44:41 PM
I mostly use a metal file too. First, I file the edge itself if I need to change the shape. As in, filing the edge blunt if that's what's needed to remove any nicks or change the shape.
Then I file the bevel. One way to do this is to hold one end of the file on the side of the head and pivot about this point so that the other end moves in an arc against the edge. Where exactly you pivot from is determined by the arc of the edge.
I might then take a stone to it.



au Offline TazzieRob

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Re: Axe sharpening advice
Reply #4 on: July 21, 2021, 04:40:07 PM
Yep, File then stone should be enough. If you have skill with a grinder and access to it, it is perfectly fine to use. I just don't have one, so I use a file for the heavy ding removal to re-establish the edge, then can refine with a stone if so desired. Though a filed edge will still perform well


us Offline Alan K.

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Re: Axe sharpening advice
Reply #5 on: July 22, 2021, 09:38:53 PM
Same as already said.  I use a file followed by a stone.  This method even salvaged the rusty edge of an axe head I found buried 2 feet deep in a park when I was digging out a fire pit. I was told it was probably there for at least 80 years.


br Offline Santos

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Re: Axe sharpening advice
Reply #6 on: August 16, 2021, 09:09:08 AM
Same as already said.  I use a file followed by a stone.  This method even salvaged the rusty edge of an axe head I found buried 2 feet deep in a park when I was digging out a fire pit. I was told it was probably there for at least 80 years.

Pics  :popcorn:
“A good plan isn't one where someone wins, it's where nobody thinks they've lost.”
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us Offline Alan K.

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Re: Axe sharpening advice
Reply #7 on: August 17, 2021, 01:56:36 AM
 :hatsoff:
After I cleaned off all of the dirt and flakey surface rust and removed what was left of the original handle I put a new handle on it and it is a little loose, but it is usable. It appears to be a 5 pound Michigan style axe head.
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* P1110229.JPG (Filesize: 169.68 KB)


nz Offline Syncop8r

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Re: Axe sharpening advice
Reply #8 on: August 17, 2021, 02:17:18 AM
Gorgeous. :dd:

Show us the top of the handle so we can see your wedges.  :pok:


us Offline Alan K.

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Re: Axe sharpening advice
Reply #9 on: August 17, 2021, 05:17:18 PM
Gorgeous. :dd:

Show us the top of the handle so we can see your wedges.  :pok:
Note, the new handle is not an exact fit. Either the axe was hand made so it isn't a standard size or the shape of the hole was affected by the rust.  I can inject an adhesive to fill the gaps if I really need to use this axe.
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* P1110231.JPG (Filesize: 147.86 KB)


nz Offline Syncop8r

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Re: Axe sharpening advice
Reply #10 on: August 18, 2021, 12:30:53 AM
I would bang the wedge in more (you may need a thicker one) so that the handle spreads to take up those gaps and ideally mushrooms over the head to hold it on. Ideally the kerf would go 2/3 - 3/4 down the eye.

EDIT: This is long and probably a bit rambling, but I'm a big fan of BBR's method. He has plenty of other videos that show how he hangs axes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVwYUV9dXbI&t=2106s
« Last Edit: August 18, 2021, 01:04:23 AM by Syncop8r »


nz Offline Syncop8r

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Re: Axe sharpening advice
Reply #11 on: August 18, 2021, 02:00:58 AM
This is another good one, although they both only touch on the wedging and concentrate more on the seating of the handle:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_rNSlFyDL4

The way I see it, these are the things that hold an axe head on (in order of hanging process):
  • Friction fit of the head on the handle. A smooth transition of width in the handle is preferred; if the head seats on a shelf it will rely solely on wedging to hold it on.
  • A timber wedge to push the handle halves against the head. The kerf should be 2/3 -3/4 of the way into the eye.
  • A portion of the end of the handle protruding past the head. When the timber wedge is driven in this mushrooms over the head to help hold the handle on.
  • A steel wedge - optional. Not required if steps 1-3 have been done properly.


 

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