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Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review 16675

Zombie Apprentice Posts: 17,517 I'm not a pessimist, I'm an experienced optimist!
Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« on: July 20, 2012, 10:57:11 PM »
I’ve recently started getting a lot more specific about my tools and what I want them to do. My latest search has been for an outdoors focussed tool, something to reach for when things go awry whilst out hiking or camping. The first to arrive was the Bear Grylls Survival Pack which comprises a slightly modified Gerber Strata in a brand new sheath design, complete with flashlight and fire steel. Although this tool was reviewed elsewhere on the forum previously by a better photographer than me, I thought I’d share my own perspective on this rather interesting ensemble.




First off the flashlight is an AAA LED light. Not one of the high powered CREE jobbies, just a simple twisty operated fixed output LED. Modest output in favour of long runtimes, in fact 6 lumens for 14 hours according to the packaging.



The photo shows a 4 Sevens Preon Revo and Quark AA2 Tactical for size comparison, and also shows the (grey) rubberised area for improved grip. The little “pip” at the end does have a hole for attaching a lanyard for greater safety against loss (improved retention and visibility)

The fire steel is a good misch metal rod in a very ergonomic handle. Plenty of traction in hand, facility for lanyard attachment and good hot long lasting sparks. The last part of that statement I know to be true after nearly setting my carpet on fire whilst testing the fire steel indoors – oops! The sparks travelled well, stayed hot on the floor and had to be stamped out. Yes I’m pretty sure I could light a fire very comfortably with this



The pliers, shown open here alongside my rather grubby and heavily used modified Wave, are not just posed open but held open by Gerber’s hidden spring mechanism. This lives inside the pliers head and so the user needs to be mindful not to use these too heavily.
Hidden mechanism = hollow section = reduced material thickness = reduced strength
This doesn’t mean the pliers are weak necessarily, just not as robust as something which is not spring loaded in the same way.

Before heading down the outdoors tool quest, the hot favourite in my arsenal for this role would have been a Victorinox Spirit X, so naturally that was the tool to compare the tool components with. Plier head size is similar, but again the user needs to be thinking lighter duty due to the issues mentioned above.



One handle holds scissors, large flat head screwdriver, combo can and bottle opener tool, and a combo edged one hand opening knife blade.




Compared with the Spirit, the scissors will be more versatile due to the wider opening and actually cut a variety of materials very well indeed. The large flat head driver won’t have the prying capability of the driver/cap lifter/crate opener combo on the Spirit, but otherwise I cannot foresee any major problems here.  Though not a huge fan of combo edged blades, this one is well done arrived nice and sharp and free of the horrible fash I discovered on my Gerber Flik. The can opener has a very interesting grind to it, not only producing a nice sharp edge but also an effective hook part for getting good purchase under the lip of the can, something that causes many other openers to fail or become very annoying.




Unlike the Victorinox opener this cuts back towards you (assuming you are right handed), and opened this can of spinach very cleanly indeed.



If you find yourself in a life and death situation with a particularly vicious bottled beverage, you’ll also be happy to hear you’ll have the little blighter decapitated in no time at all



The other handle (Gerber were kind enough to give us two) contains a wood saw, full 3D Philips driver, small flat head driver, and a nail file ... not wood file, not metal file, a nail file ... that’s what it says on the packet and for good reason.




The file is not a hungry “let me at ‘em” (Scrappy Doo style) file like on the Spirit. It’s almost a passive file, as if it’s going to try and achieve the desired result by reasoning with the material in a calm voice rather than getting all nasty and violent with it. If you do find yourself needing to do a bit of survival/tactical manicure work though – you’re all set! It’s also the striker for the fire steel, but as mentioned above - there’s nothing passive in that function.

Another thing many people comment on with the file is the shape - it’s weird! Apparently Gerber have said this is to provide a narrow file for working in tight places. Nonsense – it’d made this way because that’s the only way it will fit. What I didn’t realise from previous online pictures was the offset of the plier head in relation to the handles. This means that the slope of the file sits along the edge of the plier head in the closed position, and the little nick on the other side was the easiest way of ensuring you could hook it out with your thumbnail.



That said there was some thought having gone into this offset – notice the wire cutters. They have been oriented so the anvil cutters favour the nearer handle for cropping wires off short.



Here, maybe a close up will help you



Thankfully the saw is a little more “up for it” than the file, and is roughly equal to the length of the Spirit’s saw – both suffering that annoying little quirk of not having teeth right to the tip too. The saw did however harvest this dry stick quite well. Not quite as well as the Spirit maybe, but well enough.



The Philips driver is a big improvement over many of Gerber’s other Philips drivers. Central, decent working length for recessed screws, and a full 3D profile for purchase and strength. Again, this is not quite as excellent as on the Spirit, but still very good. As for the small flat head driver – well, that shouldn’t be there should it? This is supposed to be a survival tool endorsed by a survival expert, and while there may be circumstances where a small driver will be useful, I think many people would have liked to have seen an awl with sewing eye for fixing gear and other improvised craftwork. I know I would, and if I can get a hole in the thing, that’s exactly what that driver will become

Finally, lets have a look at the sheath. Lightweight, streamlined, durable, secure,  non-moisture retaining, and really rather clever. The light and fire starter are a secure friction fit, which give ample security against “inadvertent deployment” or stuff doing a Houdini on you. The security of the multitool itself is even better. Not only does the flexible flap hook over the moulded tab, it does it quietly too – perfect for those of you who like to hide in the undergrowth and get your tool out without anyone hearing.




On the pictures below you’ll see that the top flap is also the belt loop, which pops in and out of a couple of slots at the top of the sheath and has the same fastening at both ends, which means you can get the sheath on and off without removing your belt. The added bonus is that where the loop/flap protrudes through to the inside of the sheath is just above where the tool sits, and when the tool passes this point it “clips” nicely into place.

Want a comparison? Remember the earlier picture of the tool next to a Wave? Well if you compare this loaded sheath to that of a Charge AL, the BG sheath isn’t that much wider, especially considering there’s nothing in the elasticated loops on the Leatherman pouch, and I’d feel much less confident about securing a light and fire steel in those loops rather than the moulded pockets on the BG sheath.




In profile view you get a better appreciation of how slim they have gotten this sheath – and don’t they say that black is “slimming”? Didn’t work on Fatty Chargebuckle, did it?

So, overall thoughts? Fit and finish? Is it any good?

The fairest description I can put on it, is “perfectly adequate”. The fit and finish are not brilliant. There is some flex in the handles, and play in the locked out tools. The grip isn’t fantastically grippy, but grippy enough. It will do the job though, which is the main thing. Between the saw and knife this fairly hard bit of stick gained a nice notch, and with a dry stick like this – that’s tinder up for grabs too.



If like the guy whose name is emblazoned on this thing, you are (in his case formally) a member of an elite special forces unit who is liable to be deployed anywhere in the world at a moment’s notice and need something you can beat the life out of and have it sit there begging for more – you’re going to break this – go and buy a Swisstool!

If on the other hand you are just someone who wants a decent bit of kit to take hiking or camping with you – not just for “what if’s”, but as a working tool – then this will probably do the job quite nicely. That is assuming you are sensible enough to recognise this tool is not ultra heavy duty, does have limitations, and can work within those limitations – otherwise you’re going to break it too

Conclusion: Way better than what I expected to find, but needs using respectfully to avoid failure

Pros:
Dependable tool with a nice outdoor feel
Slim, lightweight and comprehensive package
Flashlight, fire starter and sheath are excellent accessories to the main tool

Cons:
No awl for kit repair and field craft
No lanyard attachment for working near water
Rather disappointing file



The cantankerous but occasionally useful member, formally known as 50ft-trad
Chief of the Absolutely No Life Club! Abandon All Hope Ye Who Enter Here... Posts: 42,959 Why haven't you got a Farmer yet!
Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2012, 11:21:42 PM »
Cracking review that mate :)

Love that little torch, looks right up my alley.

Give in, buy several Farmer's!!!!!!
Admin Team Point Of No Return Posts: 32,160
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2012, 11:56:08 PM »
Great read mate. :cheers:  The sheath is a lot more compact than I thought it might be.

Try not to be the person who blunders around and causes everyone else to get out the way.  Everyone else thinks you're a utter...
Keeper Of The PowerCut Admin Team Zombie Apprentice Posts: 16,886 - Allan

AHB dk

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Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2012, 11:56:31 PM »
Great review Al..  :tu: :tu:


"Don't mistake lack of talent for genius."
Multitool.org Main Site Manager Zombie Apprentice Posts: 15,287
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2012, 12:34:53 AM »
Aesthetically I quite like it but tool wise not what I want.

Good review Al, thanks :tu:

I'm not taking any more mod orders at present, sorry.
Global Moderator Zombie Apprentice Posts: 10,459 Join us! Embrace the Flicky Faith!
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2012, 01:03:16 AM »
Nice write up, Al.  :tu: I'm a fan of the Strata, one of the few around here it seems.....While not a tool that would be my first choice in a life-or-death situation, I have used the Strata pretty hard with no problems at all.  It's got the best Phillips on any of the Gerbers I own... The flat driver actually does work well as a pry tool.  Not as well as the dedicated one on the Spirit, perhaps, but I've used it way too many times in that role to complain.

There's no such thing as "Too pretty to carry".  There's only "Too pretty NOT to carry"...... >:D
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 17,517 I'm not a pessimist, I'm an experienced optimist!
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2012, 01:12:41 PM »
Thanks fellers  :salute:

Cracking review that mate :)

Love that little torch, looks right up my alley.

It did surprise me to be honest, Mike. The only "old style" LED's I tend to use are paclites (the ones that clip on a 9V battery), and this is a very good alternative I reckon

Great read mate. :cheers:  The sheath is a lot more compact than I thought it might be.

I'm not normally a sheath wearer as they get in the way. This didn't last night. I put it on for a few hours and occasionally found myself checking it was still there. Not something that would get annoying on a long hike like some would

Aesthetically I quite like it but tool wise not what I want.

Good review Al, thanks :tu:

I've intentionally avoided a Strata for a long time, and only gave this a try a part of an overhaul of outdoors kit for a future jaunt. Otherwise, it's not what I'd normally be looking for either. I'm still not convinced on the aesthetics though, and those rubber handles do seem to get mucky quickly

Nice write up, Al.  :tu: I'm a fan of the Strata, one of the few around here it seems.....While not a tool that would be my first choice in a life-or-death situation, I have used the Strata pretty hard with no problems at all.  It's got the best Phillips on any of the Gerbers I own... The flat driver actually does work well as a pry tool.  Not as well as the dedicated one on the Spirit, perhaps, but I've used it way too many times in that role to complain.

I must admit Tom, that Philips is probably the best I've seen on a Gerber. Am I now a Strata fan? I don't think so to be honest. The Strata runs at about £60 ($85 ish) over here, and had I grabbed the Strata on it's own for that money I'd have been disappointed. I fell VERY lucky with this one as they normally run about £100 for the kit, and I stumbled across this one on Amazon UK for £50!!! I like the MP700 as a nice compact and pocketable urban tool. To me the Strata feels like a MP700 with delusions of grandeur. I can see it being fine in the MP700 (urban) role (nice to know you've put it through it's paces), and there's no doubt that this version would do very well in the right hands out in the wilds. I'd feel comfortable using this as a camping/hiking tool, but I still think it could be easily overstressed by an inexperienced user or someone who is a bit heavy handed with their tools. It just doesn't have that "built like a tank" feel



The cantankerous but occasionally useful member, formally known as 50ft-trad
Full Member Posts: 237
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #7 on: July 22, 2012, 04:05:31 AM »
Thanks fo the review, I have this tool and complete agree with your comments... :tu:
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 19,555

Zed gb

******** *
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #8 on: July 22, 2012, 07:46:31 AM »
Great review Al ive only just had time to read it this am, i like the look of this package, does the firesteel strike on the back of any of the tools like the file etc, the handles look nice and grippy so could also be a good MT for on site, can a bit adapter be fitted ?  thanks for posting mate  :salute:
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 17,517 I'm not a pessimist, I'm an experienced optimist!
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #9 on: July 22, 2012, 11:06:00 AM »
The file has a fire symbol to remind you that's the striker ...



... and the actual striking part is the notch you can just see in the open position on this pic ...



I would imagine that one of the proprietary bit driver which fit a Philips would be compatible, but to be honest I don't know which one or how well. It's not something I tend to need so I haven't got any to try for you  :-[



The cantankerous but occasionally useful member, formally known as 50ft-trad
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 19,555

Zed gb

******** *
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #10 on: July 22, 2012, 11:49:50 AM »
The file has a fire symbol to remind you that's the striker ...

(Image removed from quote.)

... and the actual striking part is the notch you can just see in the open position on this pic ...

(Image removed from quote.)

I would imagine that one of the proprietary bit driver which fit a Philips would be compatible, but to be honest I don't know which one or how well. It's not something I tend to need so I haven't got any to try for you  :-[

 :tu:cheers Al,
No Life Club Posts: 2,538 There is no spoon
Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #11 on: July 22, 2012, 03:57:58 PM »
Great review Al :tu:

Never underestimate the power of the fleece
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 17,517 I'm not a pessimist, I'm an experienced optimist!
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #12 on: July 22, 2012, 06:49:39 PM »
Thanks again guys  :salute:

Thanks fo the review, I have this tool and complete agree with your comments... :tu:

Thank you, it's nice to know I've given a fair review :cheers:



The cantankerous but occasionally useful member, formally known as 50ft-trad
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,909 Any tool is better than nothing. Some not by much
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #13 on: July 23, 2012, 08:55:13 PM »
Thanks for the review. I put this thing on my Amazon wish list some time back, and have heard some good things about it. While the tool itself seems okay, I think the overall package is pretty darn good. It looks like a really nice outdoor kit.
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 17,517 I'm not a pessimist, I'm an experienced optimist!
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #14 on: July 23, 2012, 09:10:58 PM »
Thanks for the review. I put this thing on my Amazon wish list some time back, and have heard some good things about it. While the tool itself seems okay, I think the overall package is pretty darn good. It looks like a really nice outdoor kit.

That's pretty much hit the nail on the head Lynn. The tool is ... OK, the sheath firesteel and torch really do elevate it to very good. I still think it would have been better with a few extra tweaks though, but I can understand them not wanting to deviate from standard production tooling too much



The cantankerous but occasionally useful member, formally known as 50ft-trad
Head Turd Polisher Administrator Just Bananas Posts: 61,448 Optimum instrumentum est inter aures
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #15 on: July 25, 2012, 03:16:51 AM »
I really like this one.  Regardless of your feelings on the BG thing I think the grippiness and the high visibility handles make this better than the regular Strata, which I feel is one of the great unsung multitools out there.

Def

Leave the dents as they are- let your belongings show their scars as proudly as you do yours.
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 17,517 I'm not a pessimist, I'm an experienced optimist!
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #16 on: November 26, 2012, 07:04:35 PM »
I really like this one.  Regardless of your feelings on the BG thing I think the grippiness and the high visibility handles make this better than the regular Strata, which I feel is one of the great unsung multitools out there.

Def


Well, if Gerber's UK agent ever gets back to me  ::) there's a chance I may be seeing a standard Strata as replacement for a MP700 which bit the dust a while back (never did get that pliers spring fixed, despite buying old beaters for parts  :-[) It'll be nice to see how the two tools compare



The cantankerous but occasionally useful member, formally known as 50ft-trad
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 19,555

Zed gb

******** *
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #17 on: November 26, 2012, 07:35:40 PM »
I really like this one.  Regardless of your feelings on the BG thing I think the grippiness and the high visibility handles make this better than the regular Strata, which I feel is one of the great unsung multitools out there.

Def


Well, if Gerber's UK agent ever gets back to me  ::) there's a chance I may be seeing a standard Strata as replacement for a MP700 which bit the dust a while back (never did get that pliers spring fixed, despite buying old beaters for parts  :-[) It'll be nice to see how the two tools compare

Be interesting too hear how Gerber UK are compared to LM uk warranty wise Al  :tu: as i do like my mp800 but ive always liked the fact that Lm's warranty service is so good and smooth  :tu:
Admin Team Point Of No Return Posts: 32,160
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #18 on: November 26, 2012, 08:03:44 PM »
I got to have a good look at this on the way down to the last meet-up and have to say I was broadly impressed. :tu:  It didn't yell "buy me, buy me" to me, but if someone was planning on getting one I wouldn't do anything to put them off either. :tu:

Try not to be the person who blunders around and causes everyone else to get out the way.  Everyone else thinks you're a utter...
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 17,517 I'm not a pessimist, I'm an experienced optimist!
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #19 on: November 26, 2012, 09:26:45 PM »
I got to have a good look at this on the way down to the last meet-up and have to say I was broadly impressed. :tu:  It didn't yell "buy me, buy me" to me, but if someone was planning on getting one I wouldn't do anything to put them off either. :tu:

 :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

That was the most fantastically middle of the road non-committal tool appraisal I've seen in a long time mate  :D I'm impressed  :clap: :clap: :D

 :rofl:



The cantankerous but occasionally useful member, formally known as 50ft-trad
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 17,517 I'm not a pessimist, I'm an experienced optimist!
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #20 on: November 26, 2012, 09:41:55 PM »
I didn't mean non-committal did I  :think: Aw, sod it I knew what I meant  :-[  :D :D



The cantankerous but occasionally useful member, formally known as 50ft-trad
Admin Team Point Of No Return Posts: 32,160
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #21 on: November 26, 2012, 10:44:32 PM »
Wishy-washy perhaps? :D 


That's kinda the problem though; I liked it well enough to make me think it was a good tool for someone, but it didn't do enough for me to make me want to own one. :shrug:

Try not to be the person who blunders around and causes everyone else to get out the way.  Everyone else thinks you're a utter...
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 17,517 I'm not a pessimist, I'm an experienced optimist!
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #22 on: November 26, 2012, 10:57:01 PM »
I know what you mean - like we both said (slurred  :think: :P) that night, the tool is distinctly average, though add in the sheath light and firesteel and it becomes far more appealing ... especially for £50  ;)



The cantankerous but occasionally useful member, formally known as 50ft-trad
No Life Club Posts: 4,788
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #23 on: November 27, 2012, 08:52:24 AM »
I am not really a fan of teh BG series, although teh colour scheme on soem of teh items looks kinda nice.
I bought a used Strata out of curiosity, but it is not useable as the part of the handles the plier head rests on when open are broken and so teh plier just flops around.

Alas, i just wanted to add that my standard Gerber bit kit does fit the Philips nicely.
 
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,909 Any tool is better than nothing. Some not by much
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #24 on: December 25, 2012, 03:27:54 AM »
Just got one for Christmas. I'll give a review when I'm sober, and have a chance to play with it more. :D
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 17,517 I'm not a pessimist, I'm an experienced optimist!
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #25 on: December 25, 2012, 07:17:29 AM »
I look forward to hearing your thoughts Lynn  :tu:



The cantankerous but occasionally useful member, formally known as 50ft-trad
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,909 Any tool is better than nothing. Some not by much
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #26 on: December 30, 2012, 05:44:39 PM »
I had considered writing my own full review, but found that your original post said about 99% of what I'd say. So let me just put in some additional thoughts.

The Flashlight might be the perfect light level for a mix of close up task work and close range camp work. I had no problem navigating a familiar trail at night with it. and its fairly wide spread lit an area pretty well to about 5 yards/meters. The rubber grip and knurling on the light make it feel very sure in hand.

The ferro rod throws GREAT sparks. Retention in the sheath is excellent out of package, but I fear with use, wearing down the rod, it would loosen. The grip on this tool, as with the light, is excellent.

The MT itself.. Uggg. I want to give it a fair shake but it pissed me off right out of the gate. The locks on the tools are so stiff, it was nearly impossible to unlock any of the tools on either side of the MT. Painfully difficult. Literally. And unfolding every tool felt like it was grinding through sand in the joints. Getting past that, the blade comes wicked sharp, the philips driver has great purchase and worked fine to turn a stubburn woodscrew. I posted my results of testing the scissors in the scissors thread in the general forum, but to sum up, they are great on light material, bad on heavy material due to the little thumbstud used to press them down being too small, so heavy cutting is painful. The can opener had zero rim jumps while opening two cans of food and did its job better than average in my opinion. Grip on the tool is darn good with plier assembly closed. It is fantastic with pliers open. Wire cutters cut a wire coat hanger with a one hand grip. Spring force to open the plier head is very modest and non-obtrusive.

Leftiness.. The tool has only a few less-than-friendly to left handed user features. The thumbstud to open the blade is placed for a right handed user. The notch in the file for striking the ferro rod is hard to use left handed as the body of the tool is in the way, and the tab for opening the sheath is easier to use righthanded than lefthanded. Nothing deal breaking.

I am seriously concerned with the frame construction of the tool and serious flex under high grip force with the pliers. There seems to be loadbearing portions of the frame that are plastic, which I fear would break under force that a reasonably strong man could generate, or most anyone with a two hand grip.

Weight and dimensions in hand made me really think of the Wave, although my scale says this tool is a bit lighter... more like a Vic Spirit.

As for the file... we shall not discuss the file. :)

In full disclosure, I haven't tested the saw yet.

This tool set has a lot of plastic and rubber. My experience with rubber bits on tools is that it eventually either gets gummy or hardens. I suspect the handle inserts, and flashlight wrap are of the gummy variety. I think the rubber of the sheath flap is of the harden variety. In any case I suspect that it means the toolkit has a very finite lifespan. Time will tell.

So... worth the money? Hey, I go it free for Christmas, so smurf yeah! I'd say if you could pick it up for 40 - 50 bucks, you won't feel cheat. What's that translate to in MT Euro cost... like 800e ? :)
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 17,517 I'm not a pessimist, I'm an experienced optimist!
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #27 on: December 31, 2012, 12:24:05 AM »
Thanks for your thoughts Lynn.

I agree the locks are fussy, fussier than they need to be. Personally I find sticking my thumbnail in behind the slide to give extra purchase helps over just squeezing and dragging. I must be honest, leftiness didn't enter my radar as I'm not defective that way  :P :D :D

Good point on the ferro rod wearing - that eluded me completely. It's great retention, but relies on friction on the ferro rod at the (as new) diameter  :-\ However, this is sold more as a survival (back up tool) than a bushcrafting frequent use item, so although it's a bit poo after many uses, at least it doesn't fail to do what it is meant to.

Longevity of the polymer surfaces  :think: well, time will tell on those. I don't know enough to know how what the materials are and how prone to degradation they are. All in all, I think the tool is a fair effort and I've had far more frustration and disappointment with tools from their neighbour in Portland

UK prices? Well they retail here around £100 (GBP), though they can be had for less with a little shopping around. That translates to about $150-160 US. At that price it's not worth it, but I picked mine up for around £50 ($75-80). Bear in mind a LM Juice over here will cost between £60 & £100 dependent on the model, and I ended up with a better tool, a torch, a firesteel and a really cool pouch for less money than a Juice. From that perspective I am very happy with it



The cantankerous but occasionally useful member, formally known as 50ft-trad
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,909 Any tool is better than nothing. Some not by much
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #28 on: December 31, 2012, 12:55:11 AM »
Defective? DEFECTIVE??!?!?!!???!!!
I'll have you know that being left handed is the LEAST of my many defects!

Emmm... I Mean...:D

I think every tool has a price point that makes it worth it, and agree that even at equal cost, this pack is likely more useful than a LM Juice. At lower cost, yep, I think it would be worth it.
Admin Team Point Of No Return Posts: 32,160
Re: Bear Grylls Survival Tool Pack - In-depth Review
« Reply #29 on: December 31, 2012, 12:58:55 AM »
Al well knows my total apathy towards the BG tool. ;)  It's a nice enough tool and if someone gave me one for Christmas I'd be very happy, but I'm not likely to spend my hard earned cash on one any time soon either. :shrug:

Try not to be the person who blunders around and causes everyone else to get out the way.  Everyone else thinks you're a utter...

 

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