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Guide for the international trader 8177

Global Moderator Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 19,999 I may get older but I refuse to grow up.
Re: Guide for the international trader
« Reply #30 on: July 25, 2013, 11:05:23 PM »
Thanks for the input, rmagralha. :cheers:

And I feel your pain.  :-\  I passed on on a lot of great deals I saw cause the customs fees would make it not a good deal anymore. (40% here but still :( ) At least I can now since the 1st of July import from the EU countries without fear of customs fees.


I've been wondering if I should sticky this thread. :think: Buddy suggested it to me per PM too. I have a link to it in my signature and with a dozen or two post a day I have it does get seen but maybe a permanent place at the top of the Swap Shop would be better. The weird thing is that a copy of this thread is actually stickied on EDCF (as it was created simultaneously on both forums as I gathered the info from members on both and updated the threads).
Sr. Member Posts: 475
Re: Guide for the international trader
« Reply #31 on: August 06, 2013, 01:59:17 AM »
Go sticky, is really helpful! Pleasure to help.  :tu:
No Life Club Posts: 4,883 Τετραφάρμακος
Re: Guide for the international trader
« Reply #32 on: January 07, 2014, 09:06:00 AM »
For Greece it is really complicated. It seems that it relies heavily on customs' officer discrimination. But in general packs from EU either pass without charges or one pays the VAT difference (here it is 23%). From other countries you usually (but not always) pay nothing for a small pack declared under 99 euros or pounds or dollars (I know it isn't the same but it is an approximation anyway) and you pay the VAT plus some other tax (such as consumer's tax on energy products, tobacco and alcohol). For a single SAK or Multitool declared up to 90 euros don't expect to pay anything, even if it's cast with diamonds and platinum, but there are some rare suprises from time to time.

Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,171
Re: Guide for the international trader
« Reply #33 on: January 07, 2014, 05:44:28 PM »
Comments on Norway:
The toll limit is for boight items is $33 without shipping. However if the item costs more than $33 then you have to pay toll on the shipping as well.

Example: $33 SAK + $12 shipping= no toll.

$35 SAK + $10shipping= toll:$45*0,25= $11.25 + customs fee ($15-20)


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-Knívleysur maður er lívleysur maður.
 "A Knifeless man is a lifeless man" old Faroese proverb.
Hero Member Posts: 564
Re: Guide for the international trader
« Reply #34 on: February 04, 2014, 11:10:57 PM »
Well my country laws on international purchases have recently gone to hell.

Argentina:

As of now we can only have 2 shipments per year subject to a tax of 50% on customs plus a 35% they charge over your payment+shipping on any international purchase.  :poh:

Not happy with that we have to fill a form declaring were we got the money from, etc.

If the item plus shipping cost is of less than u$s 25 you are free of taxes which is almost impossible.


Sooo i just bought a knife online and after that no more importing nothing for me until this dreaded goverment changes.  :rant:
« Last Edit: February 04, 2014, 11:45:47 PM by RamoN »
Hero Member Posts: 874

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Re: Guide for the international trader
« Reply #35 on: April 08, 2014, 04:27:34 PM »
I'd like to explain about Brazil.

Any imported goods declared with more than 50 US$ are taxed in 60%, product cost+shipping. Those items can remain in customs for months depending on the country that is coming from.

Shipments transported by couriers (FEDEX, UPS, DHL) are always taxed in 100% doesn't matter the declared value.

Marking goods as "gift" does not guarantee that will pass through customs, they do a random analysis in the lot, so your item can be taxed if they feel that it should, The same apply for items that seems to worth more than 50US$ and was declared with less than that, as SAKs are small and do not call attention usually it pass through fine even if it was a couple of hundreds of dollars.

Just want to give you this overview so folks can understand why sometimes Brazilians ask to lower declaration values, taxes are huge here.... :-[ and the government does not justify these taxes with benefits for the people.

Really interesting thread enki! :tu:

  I just heard on the news that (and I could be wrong, I'll check the info) as long as you buy from a person and not a company, if the value of the purchase+shipping is under US$50 the taxes are not applied (not guaranteed, I've heard of purchases that really were under the 50 mark and got taxed). So any purchases, even under US$50, made from any company will be charged.   :rant: :facepalm:
Global Moderator Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 19,999 I may get older but I refuse to grow up.
Re: Guide for the international trader
« Reply #36 on: April 08, 2014, 08:14:18 PM »
Yeah, same here, the theory part. ::) $26 when buying from a company and $50 if buying from a private person, though they still sometimes charge you even if you buy from a private person or ebay. :-\ It's a gamble, even if you play by the rules doesn't matter they will. :(
Sr. Member Posts: 475
Re: Guide for the international trader
« Reply #37 on: April 09, 2014, 02:01:39 AM »

I'd like to explain about Brazil.

Any imported goods declared with more than 50 US$ are taxed in 60%, product cost+shipping. Those items can remain in customs for months depending on the country that is coming from.

Shipments transported by couriers (FEDEX, UPS, DHL) are always taxed in 100% doesn't matter the declared value.

Marking goods as "gift" does not guarantee that will pass through customs, they do a random analysis in the lot, so your item can be taxed if they feel that it should, The same apply for items that seems to worth more than 50US$ and was declared with less than that, as SAKs are small and do not call attention usually it pass through fine even if it was a couple of hundreds of dollars.

Just want to give you this overview so folks can understand why sometimes Brazilians ask to lower declaration values, taxes are huge here.... :-[ and the government does not justify these taxes with benefits for the people.

Really interesting thread enki! :tu:

  I just heard on the news that (and I could be wrong, I'll check the info) as long as you buy from a person and not a company, if the value of the purchase+shipping is under US$50 the taxes are not applied (not guaranteed, I've heard of purchases that really were under the 50 mark and got taxed). So any purchases, even under US$50, made from any company will be charged.   :rant: :facepalm:

In theory....unfortunately....EMS is taxed anyway for example. But you are right, that is what they say.
No Life Club Posts: 2,455 Look at all those shiny sharp things.
Re: Guide for the international trader
« Reply #38 on: May 26, 2014, 09:14:24 PM »
Finnish customs rules have changed. Outside EU. Now you have to pay 24% Tax of product that value is 22€. And if you get a gift value more than 45€. Also you have to pay manufacturing tax of 2,5-7,5%.
Minimum manufacturing tax is 10€ and minimum VAT is 5€. If tax is less than those, you do not have to pay it.
Postal fees are added to value of product,  if product value is more than 22€. So you have to pay VAT from that aswell.
Seller should always add a receipt or invoice of somekind, when sending stuff to Finland.
I hope i used right terms/translation. And everyone understands.
No Life Club Posts: 4,525 Don't judge a tool by it's brand
Re: Guide for the international trader
« Reply #39 on: May 27, 2014, 10:45:04 AM »
Finnish customs rules have changed. Outside EU. Now you have to pay 24% Tax of product that value is 22€. And if you get a gift value more than 45€. Also you have to pay manufacturing tax of 2,5-7,5%.
Minimum manufacturing tax is 10€ and minimum VAT is 5€. If tax is less than those, you do not have to pay it.
Postal fees are added to value of product,  if product value is more than 22€. So you have to pay VAT from that aswell.
Seller should always add a receipt or invoice of somekind, when sending stuff to Finland.
I hope i used right terms/translation. And everyone understands.


So... What -is- manufacturing tax?  :think:


Sounds like your getting smurfed quite hard, there.  :facepalm:  Do they tax every single package, or do they just pick at random?

A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller. : http://forum.multitool.or...ex.php/topic,47532.0.html

I feel more awesome than an awesome possum 8)
No Life Club Posts: 2,455 Look at all those shiny sharp things.
Re: Guide for the international trader
« Reply #40 on: May 27, 2014, 12:02:56 PM »
I do not know What it really is. I think it might be called tariff. This is what they make me pay. Basically they should tax everything That costs more than 22€, but sometimes something might slip through.
Here Where I live, Vic Spartan costs 22€, Lm Rebar 75€ cheapest.
No Life Club Posts: 4,525 Don't judge a tool by it's brand
Re: Guide for the international trader
« Reply #41 on: May 27, 2014, 04:31:53 PM »
Some input for ze Netherlands:


When importing into the Netherlands, the following rules are in play. A difference is made between buying  from "organisations or businesses" and buying/getting a gift from private persons
 
 
Buying from "organisations or businesses":
 
From an EU country, you don't have to pay any taxes.
 
From a country outside of the EU, it's a bit harder:
  No taxes if the value of the products (without shipping or insurances) is less than €22,-
   Only VAT if the value is between €22,- and €150,-
  • VAT -and- import-taxes if the value is more than €150,-
   
VAT is 21% or 6% depending on the product
 
Import taxes depend on the product, as well, but they're less clear about it. It seems to be between 0% and 15%.
 
According to the Dutch customs website: "in almost all cases, the shipping company will take care of the taxes. When they do this, they can charge you for:
  Costs that the company makes for the taxing (for lack of a better word)
   Other costs the company makes when doing work for you
  • The actual taxes charged on the product
   
 
Receiving a gift from  a private person:
 
No taxes within the EU
 
From outside of the EU:
  No taxes if the value is less than €45,-
  • If the value is between €45,- and €700,- you pay VAT plus 2,5% import taxes
  • If the value is over €700,- you pay normal taxes (like from a company)
   
Watch out, there's limits on the amount of alcoholics, tabacco and perfumes you can import.
 
 
Personal experience addition: Even thought the official site says nothing about it, chances that you do get charged taxes are not too high, I've been charged twice by now, over a whole lot of packages, so that's not too bad :)

A knife-carrying guide for the international traveller. : http://forum.multitool.or...ex.php/topic,47532.0.html

I feel more awesome than an awesome possum 8)
Global Moderator Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 19,999 I may get older but I refuse to grow up.
Re: Guide for the international trader
« Reply #42 on: May 27, 2014, 08:04:35 PM »
Thanks for the added info, guys. :cheers:

Keep it coming. :salute:

 

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