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A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy) 850

Full Member Posts: 241
A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« on: August 31, 2016, 11:29:25 PM »
Years ago I did quite a bit of backpacking into the wilderness and started with an Optimus 8R stove.  It worked quite well but was heavy.  The little pump was handy to prime the stove but didn't seem to help it much once running.


As you can see it was well used.

I eventually obtained an MSR Whisperlite and found that when it worked it was very hot, it didn't simmer well and was temperamental.  It was ok if one used it regularly but I didn't and inevitably forgot how to cater to it's needs.

A few years ago I bought an Optimus Nova multi fuel stove.  It works well with white gas but tends to clog up with kerosene.  It is the older, good version of the stove - the newer ones have their problems.



In our area it's easy enough to obtain white gas in the bigger centres but not in small towns.  We were camping in a small town a few years ago and i brought along the nova and kerosene.  It clogged up and nothing I could do would get it to work.  We could not get white gas either so were somewhat out of luck for heat.  That persuaded me to change systems.  A friend was sold on alcohol stoves from his earlier life in Europe and I took his advice and bought a trangia.  Since then I've used alcohol stoves pretty much exclusively.  Below are some of these "systems".

I tend to use my trangia 27 most of the time as we usually car camp or travel by car and it's handy for a stop to make a cup of tea or coffee.  It is a bit bulky and heavy but works and is pretty much bullet proof as far as wind or bad weather.

Shown packed up:



Shown partially unpacked.  Includes the trangia burner, two non stick pots, pot grabber etc.


I put duct tape on the pot grabber to prevent it from scratching the pots and always use a bit of cloth or plastic between pots and burner also to prevent damage to the inside of the pots.


The next set up I occasionally use is a bit smaller and is based upon a Tatonka alcohol burner.  It's made in stainless and very similar to the trangia - not very common but works well.  The pot with this one is approx. 1 liter in capacity.


Shown with a windscreen, pot and diy mesh bag.


Shown with a trangia simmer ring, Tatonka burner, pot and lid and pot stand.  The trangia simmer ring works properly on the Tatonka burner.

The next version is very lightweight and compact and great for making tea during a hike.  A bit small for overnight trips or longer but could work if needed.


Shown with a cat stove for scale.  Bag is another diy light nylon bag.


Pot is about 1/2 litre, small pot grabber, windscreen and pot stand.  The burner is a "pepsi can stove" I made years ago.

Last  is three cat stoves that I made some time ago.  They are fairly durable, very easy to make and easy to replace.



I haven't used them very much but do recall them working quite well.

Thanks for looking,


John.


Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 13,384 Sing, Michael, sing. On the route of the 19 Bus!
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2016, 01:45:02 AM »
I have that same Trangia set, its starting to look well used now but I reckon it'll outlive me! Great set isn't it?

Mine has produced many a bacon butty in its time :D


No Life Club Posts: 3,495 Benner fan club #003
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2016, 03:25:22 AM »
T27 owner here too  :tu:

Optimus makes a non-metal pot lifter that is easier on non-stick coatings in case you're interested - http://www.campsaver.com/terra-pot-lifter
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 16,077 words and stuff...
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2016, 03:33:25 AM »
Nice stoves and thanks for sharing.

Nate
Full Member Posts: 241
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2016, 05:49:56 AM »
DaveK. It is very handy.  Looks like you use it for real cooking.  I tend to stick with soups and stew and the like.

Spork. Thanks for the info on the pot lifter.  Will look for one.

Ducttapetech. Glad you found it interesting.

John
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 9,196
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2016, 06:00:43 AM »
Nice review of your experience's I have a Firebox 2 that I can use a Trangia burner with. Have not tried it yet. But hope to soon.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2016, 06:01:52 AM by David »

What? Enablers! Are you serrrrious? Where? I dont see any.

Hold Fast
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 13,384 Sing, Michael, sing. On the route of the 19 Bus!
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2016, 08:44:02 AM »
DaveK. It is very handy.  Looks like you use it for real cooking.

What, there's another kind of cooking that isn't bacon  :think: :D

In truth, that's about as adventurous as I get whether at home or out and about. The kettle and the frying pan get used most here.

Tbh I never bothered about scratching them up but they seem to have worn pretty well using the stock grabber / handle thing.

I have been considering something smaller just for making coffee on walks, but its not high priority. That changes as winter approaches each year, so who knows maybe this year I'll actually buy something, lol.

Global Moderator Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 19,999 I may get older but I refuse to grow up.
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2016, 12:16:55 PM »
Very cool progression. :hatsoff:

What problems did you have with the Optimus 8R stove exactly and how heavy is it? A guy here is selling one for about $17 and I've been considering buying it to try it out.
No Life Club Posts: 3,495 Benner fan club #003
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #8 on: September 01, 2016, 03:15:15 PM »
I can't stop watching DaveK cooking bacon   :drool:  :D
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 13,384 Sing, Michael, sing. On the route of the 19 Bus!
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #9 on: September 01, 2016, 03:21:33 PM »
I can't stop watching DaveK cooking bacon   :drool: :D

Makes your mouth water doesn't it?

And bacon tastes sooooo much better cooked outdoors too  :drool:

Sr. Member Posts: 486
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #10 on: September 01, 2016, 04:04:54 PM »
Very cool progression. :hatsoff:

What problems did you have with the Optimus 8R stove exactly and how heavy is it? A guy here is selling one for about $17 and I've been considering buying it to try it out.

IMHO it is a good price, if you are not considering backpacking with it (i.e. if you're gonna drive to the camping site etc...)
Wielder of the Bow of Banishment. Admin Team Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 29,405 El Presidente del Fan Club Micky D
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #11 on: September 01, 2016, 04:29:58 PM »
I have that same Trangia set, its starting to look well used now but I reckon it'll outlive me! Great set isn't it?

Mine has produced many a bacon butty in its time :D



You're using the wrong tool for the job though. ;)



That's more like it. :D

Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 13,384 Sing, Michael, sing. On the route of the 19 Bus!
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #12 on: September 01, 2016, 04:31:34 PM »
Wow! That takes me back lol :D

(And I did use a PST in the clip :P )

Full Member Posts: 241
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #13 on: September 01, 2016, 04:32:22 PM »
Optimus 8r -  I never had problems with it as I recall.  It helps to keep it a bit warm before starting it or put a bit of fuel in the priming cup from a separate bottle.  A bit of alcohol might work although I never tried that.  It is a small stove so smaller pots or kettles are best for it.  It is heavy.

Seems like $17 is fair although you could make a cat stove or Pepsi can stove and wind screen and buy a small pot or kettle for a similar price and use alcohol for fuel.  It would be a lighter system and pretty much foolproof except in quite cold weather.

John
Wielder of the Bow of Banishment. Admin Team Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 29,405 El Presidente del Fan Club Micky D
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #14 on: September 01, 2016, 04:35:39 PM »
I've been a fan of Trangia for years now and my 25 has come on many a camping trip.  However they are a bit on the bulky side if you're hiking and trying to keep the size and weight down, so I've been using a simple Vango Compact gas stove for that purpose.

Global Moderator Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 19,999 I may get older but I refuse to grow up.
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #15 on: September 01, 2016, 04:46:46 PM »
Yeah, I've been using a small, lightweight Campingaz Twister for over a decade now. But the gas for it isn't available everywhere and is usually quite pricey.

No Life Club Posts: 3,495 Benner fan club #003
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #16 on: September 01, 2016, 05:33:15 PM »
Yeah, I've been using a small, lightweight Campingaz Twister for over a decade now. But the gas for it isn't available everywhere and is usually quite pricey.

(Image removed from quote.)

I've had to horde Campinggaz cartridges and refill them to keep my stoves and lanterns fed. Campinggaz is virtually non-existent in the US since Coleman bought them out.
Global Moderator Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 19,999 I may get older but I refuse to grow up.
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #17 on: September 01, 2016, 06:32:08 PM »
Yes, I remember asking you about the way you fill them and know there is a part you have to buy extra but forgot the details. :-\

I have it bookmarked somewhere.

BTW are you using these cartridges like in my pic with te shutoff valve?
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 10,285
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #18 on: September 01, 2016, 09:34:03 PM »

Nice thread John, interesting  :salute:

Everything’s adjustable
No Life Club Posts: 3,495 Benner fan club #003
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #19 on: September 01, 2016, 09:34:58 PM »
Global Moderator Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 19,999 I may get older but I refuse to grow up.
Full Member Posts: 241
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #21 on: September 01, 2016, 10:21:37 PM »
Enki_ck.

The Optimus 8r, empty, weighs 1 lb. 8 oz.  In contrast the light weight soda can stove with pot support, windscreen and bag (yellow), and small kettle weighs just under 8 oz.

The 1 litre pot set up including pot, simmer ring, katonka burner, pot stand, wind screen and blue bag is 1 lb. 2 oz.

Keep in mind that the 8r weight is only the stove with no pot etc. 

I could likely shave an oz or two off the weights of the alcohol stoves with a bit of tweaking but that's what they are now according to my kitchen scale.

On the other hand I believe the 8r is regarded as a collectable so sells at a bit of a premium.

Sparky415 - glad you are enjoying it.  I am also finding it interesting. 

John

Full Member Posts: 241
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #22 on: September 01, 2016, 10:24:16 PM »
Garett

Never heard of a vango gas stove.  Do they use a canister with compressed gas?

John
Wielder of the Bow of Banishment. Admin Team Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 29,405 El Presidente del Fan Club Micky D
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #23 on: September 01, 2016, 10:56:18 PM »
Garett

Never heard of a vango gas stove.  Do they use a canister with compressed gas?

John

http://www.vango.co.uk/gb...30-compact-gas-stove.html 

Yes, a very generic gas stove (and most likely it's sold under many different brand names) that takes the screw on style of compressed gas canister.

No Life Club Posts: 3,495 Benner fan club #003
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #24 on: September 02, 2016, 12:59:13 AM »
CampinGaz TriStar...a bit odd because the control has fixed positions. 4 clicks - Off, 1, 2 and 3
No Life Club Posts: 3,495 Benner fan club #003
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #25 on: September 02, 2016, 01:04:38 AM »
CampingGaz Turbo 270...I found that I could substitute the valve with one from a Primus stove to use threaded Lindal valve cartridges.
No Life Club Posts: 3,495 Benner fan club #003
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #26 on: September 02, 2016, 01:12:50 AM »
CampingGaz 470 HP...my favorite. It's the second stove I've owned and it is great for real cooking. The piezo ignitor was meant for a different model and I adapted it to fit...it's been removed since this photo as it never worked reliably.
Full Member Posts: 241
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #27 on: September 02, 2016, 02:37:23 AM »
Garett - I have seen similar ones but never used one.  Should be reliable I expect.

Spork - the tri star I like the looks of - low to the ground and stable.

We used a Coleman white gas two burner stove for car camping for years but I got tired of it's bulk, weight and ability to go through a lot of gas in short order.  It was very reliable I must admit.  I no longer have it but it was one of the ones with the red tank out front and a green rectangular case.

I have not used canister stoves so haven't kept up with what is available or not.  The only canisters I use are propane for a small torch for soldering and small bits of heat treating.


John.
No Life Club Posts: 3,495 Benner fan club #003
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #28 on: September 02, 2016, 03:54:17 AM »
Another one from the olden days  :D ...a Primus Grasshopper
Wielder of the Bow of Banishment. Admin Team Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 29,405 El Presidente del Fan Club Micky D
Re: A progression of outdoor stoves (lengthy)
« Reply #29 on: September 02, 2016, 09:35:08 AM »
Another one from the olden days  :D ...a Primus Grasshopper

Now that's definitely one I've not seen before. :o


 

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