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Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument 5964

Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,621
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #60 on: December 04, 2017, 10:54:30 PM »
Can someone explain one other thing - why are some people spending very big sums of money (let us say over $500 or €500, depending on where we are) on backpacks that weight more than the contents of the bag put together (especially those 120liter "backpack" that requires a frame and straps and a hip belt which are all sold separately) but then count grams on eating utensils, folding knives (the back up for a fixed blade), fixed blade knives (have to be light to strike fast :facepalm: ) and just about everything else with the exception of a wool blanket which is often in itself heavier than most well rounded sleep systems of equal warmth can be?
Beats me about the packs. I just use an old ALICE pack I got for 25 bucks. Has a frame, light weight and tough as nails.
I do like wools blankets. But I use them when it is warmer and I don't need a bulky -30 sleeping bag.

If done right, even with wool blankets and older gear that is heavier, the pack with everything in it should only weigh about 25 to 30 pounds at most. Give or take on the climate.  Food and water is about the only thing that should really start to weigh the pack down. And that is just for camping. A BOB or 72 hour or what the hell ever they are called now will have more in it. But of course, it is a totally different situation. You may have kids with you or other factors.
I have said in a another thread before, people are really over thinking this anymore and are just going at each other. The thing is, it is you who is going to be using the bag and make the bag according to you skills and the things you like or are used to and make it to fit you needs.

That's what I've been saying for about a decade now. Sure the new packs might have bells and whistles, but an old Alice pack will do the job and won't be an eyesore. Now I don't have anything against a bit of extra weight but if I'm willing to take heavy items when there are alternatives that are lighter, just as good and oddly in the same price range then I certainly shouldn't be taking compromises on the rest of the gear. A plastic spoon is maybe 3 grams, a spoon from my kitchen is about 24. Sure I'd save 21 grams but if I'm willing to not save 1200 with other choices, then those 21 grams aren't that big of a deal.

Can someone explain one other thing - why are some people spending very big sums of money (let us say over $500 or €500, depending on where we are) on backpacks that weight more than the contents of the bag put together (especially those 120liter "backpack" that requires a frame and straps and a hip belt which are all sold separately) but then count grams on eating utensils, folding knives (the back up for a fixed blade), fixed blade knives (have to be light to strike fast :facepalm: ) and just about everything else with the exception of a wool blanket which is often in itself heavier than most well rounded sleep systems of equal warmth can be?
I cannot talk about other people... but I own two EVOC backpacks (10 & 20L). They are both fairly heavy and fairly expensive. They are heavy due to the many pockets on the inside, letting you organize stuff (Ok, the 20L is also heavy because it has a back protector built in, not the worst idea when you cycle on icy roads).

CON
- Heavy
- Expensive

PRO
- Excellent quality and waterproof (the 20L has a built in water cover)
- The many pockets/sleeves let you organize your gear for easy access and saves you some weight as you don't need additional organizers like a Maxpedition pouch.
- They are small (as opposed to wide) allowing you to move unhindered in crowds

And yeah, if I can find equivalent/better gear that is lighter, I go for it. I have to carry it all the time.
If you are talking about those ridiculous "tactical" backpacks with molle webbing (which no one uses but adds tons of weight) all over... I have no idea :D

I was talking about the tactical backpacks.

Solving problems you didn't know you had in the most obscure way possible

"And now, it's time to hand this over to our tame race axe driver. Some say, he can live in the forest for six months at a time without food, and he knows of a secret tribe of only women where he is their God. All we know is, he's call the Styx!" - TazzieRob
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,750
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #61 on: December 04, 2017, 11:01:10 PM »
Sure the new packs might have bells and whistles, but an old Alice pack will do the job and won't be an eyesore.
No, but they will give you a backsore. External frames? Horrible. Ancient technology that puts the weight on your back instead of your hips. Yuck. Never going near one again.

Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,843 Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, over.
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #62 on: December 05, 2017, 02:10:27 AM »
Sure the new packs might have bells and whistles, but an old Alice pack will do the job and won't be an eyesore.
No, but they will give you a backsore. External frames? Horrible. Ancient technology that puts the weight on your back instead of your hips. Yuck. Never going near one again.
I am not sure about yours, but mine never gave me a back sore. The internal frame are way to hot on my back. But that just may be me.

Nate

SEND IT!
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,621
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #63 on: December 05, 2017, 10:37:53 AM »
Sure the new packs might have bells and whistles, but an old Alice pack will do the job and won't be an eyesore.
No, but they will give you a backsore. External frames? Horrible. Ancient technology that puts the weight on your back instead of your hips. Yuck. Never going near one again.

One thing that sucks is being younger and or injury free (at least when it comes to the back). I don't think about these things because they don't bother me.
Now this is a mild example of what I mean. All these packs are about 45 liters:
Karrimor Sabre 45 is 1.84kg  (tactical)
Kelty Redwing 44 is 1.40kg  (basic backpacking)
Gossmer gear Gorilla is 0.74kg  (ultra light backpacking)

Now these are just the ones I had on a spreadsheet since they are more reasonably priced and I'll be the first to admit that there are far worse examples out there of heavy backpacks (Eberlestock). On the other hand I'm not sure a lot of us would be jumping from joy with an UL pack simply due to the lighter materials that could be susceptible to breaking more easily

Solving problems you didn't know you had in the most obscure way possible

"And now, it's time to hand this over to our tame race axe driver. Some say, he can live in the forest for six months at a time without food, and he knows of a secret tribe of only women where he is their God. All we know is, he's call the Styx!" - TazzieRob
OCD Squad Leader Admin Team Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,637
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #64 on: December 05, 2017, 10:39:16 AM »
Can someone explain one other thing - why are some people spending very big sums of money (let us say over $500 or €500, depending on where we are) on backpacks that weight more than the contents of the bag put together (especially those 120liter "backpack" that requires a frame and straps and a hip belt which are all sold separately) but then count grams on eating utensils, folding knives (the back up for a fixed blade), fixed blade knives (have to be light to strike fast :facepalm: ) and just about everything else with the exception of a wool blanket which is often in itself heavier than most well rounded sleep systems of equal warmth can be?
Beats me about the packs. I just use an old ALICE pack I got for 25 bucks. Has a frame, light weight and tough as nails.
I do like wools blankets. But I use them when it is warmer and I don't need a bulky -30 sleeping bag.

If done right, even with wool blankets and older gear that is heavier, the pack with everything in it should only weigh about 25 to 30 pounds at most. Give or take on the climate.  Food and water is about the only thing that should really start to weigh the pack down. And that is just for camping. A BOB or 72 hour or what the hell ever they are called now will have more in it. But of course, it is a totally different situation. You may have kids with you or other factors.
I have said in a another thread before, people are really over thinking this anymore and are just going at each other. The thing is, it is you who is going to be using the bag and make the bag according to you skills and the things you like or are used to and make it to fit you needs.

That's what I've been saying for about a decade now. Sure the new packs might have bells and whistles, but an old Alice pack will do the job and won't be an eyesore. Now I don't have anything against a bit of extra weight but if I'm willing to take heavy items when there are alternatives that are lighter, just as good and oddly in the same price range then I certainly shouldn't be taking compromises on the rest of the gear. A plastic spoon is maybe 3 grams, a spoon from my kitchen is about 24. Sure I'd save 21 grams but if I'm willing to not save 1200 with other choices, then those 21 grams aren't that big of a deal.

Can someone explain one other thing - why are some people spending very big sums of money (let us say over $500 or €500, depending on where we are) on backpacks that weight more than the contents of the bag put together (especially those 120liter "backpack" that requires a frame and straps and a hip belt which are all sold separately) but then count grams on eating utensils, folding knives (the back up for a fixed blade), fixed blade knives (have to be light to strike fast :facepalm: ) and just about everything else with the exception of a wool blanket which is often in itself heavier than most well rounded sleep systems of equal warmth can be?
I cannot talk about other people... but I own two EVOC backpacks (10 & 20L). They are both fairly heavy and fairly expensive. They are heavy due to the many pockets on the inside, letting you organize stuff (Ok, the 20L is also heavy because it has a back protector built in, not the worst idea when you cycle on icy roads).

CON
- Heavy
- Expensive

PRO
- Excellent quality and waterproof (the 20L has a built in water cover)
- The many pockets/sleeves let you organize your gear for easy access and saves you some weight as you don't need additional organizers like a Maxpedition pouch.
- They are small (as opposed to wide) allowing you to move unhindered in crowds

And yeah, if I can find equivalent/better gear that is lighter, I go for it. I have to carry it all the time.
If you are talking about those ridiculous "tactical" backpacks with molle webbing (which no one uses but adds tons of weight) all over... I have no idea :D

I was talking about the tactical backpacks.
I cannot help you with that. Tactical and camo seem extremely counter-productive in emergency situations.

Being seen avoids a great deal dangers
Being seen allows for being rescued
And as much as we like to be "self reliant", most emergencies require people to work together, or are at least far easier resolved when collaborating.

I mean most "preppers" seem to have a rather skewed perspective. There is a far bigger chance of getting run over by a car, than getting robbed. Chances of bodily harm or death is even greater with car accidents than robberies.
Furthermore, the "tough" look actually makes you a target for robberies, rather than deterring others. Because, a "prepper" will carry emergency cash and very likely he has some expensive gear on him (looking at knife prices / guns are among the most popular things to steal). Whereas Joe Average might just have a pack of gum.

I virtually see no benefit to camo/tactical clothing/gear.



Emergency Kit: Ovo Sport, chocolate, cheese, crispbread and a coin
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,750
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #65 on: December 05, 2017, 11:17:34 AM »
I first started hiking with this model of pack. It was only 45 litres but it felt like 100kg.

Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,843 Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, over.
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #66 on: December 05, 2017, 11:23:25 AM »
Quote from: Etherealicer

I virtually see no benefit to camo/tactical clothing/gear.[/quote

It is great for hunting and I can get the stuff at a military surplus store for a fraction of the cost than what Real Tree and Mossy Oak stuff is going for. I do wish some of the tactical stuff would come in different colors so it does not look so tactical. Some of the stuff is very versatile and practical.

Nate

SEND IT!
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,750
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #67 on: December 05, 2017, 11:32:51 AM »
I used something like this https://www.armyandoutdoors.co.nz/collections/hiking-packs/products/usgi-large-alice-pack in the army, except it didn't have a hipbelt. As bad as the previous one but had some hot spots that would dig in.
I prefer this (below left)... 75 litres and you don't feel you are carrying much.

Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,750
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #68 on: December 05, 2017, 11:38:52 AM »
I virtually see no benefit to camo/tactical clothing/gear.
It is great for hunting and I can get the stuff at a military surplus store for a fraction of the cost than what Real Tree and Mossy Oak stuff is going for. I do wish some of the tactical stuff would come in different colors so it does not look so tactical. Some of the stuff is very versatile and practical.
A lot of military equipment is rugged and well made. I too try to find less "tactical" stuff.

Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,621
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #69 on: December 05, 2017, 01:12:45 PM »
I know in Europe the Dutch military backpacks are held in high esteem

Has anyone tried those old style packs like the Fjallraven Rucksack No. 21 or the Greenland Backpack? Not the best weight wise but I still remember seeing old backpackers and hikers with those and at least one metal cup dangling on the outside

Solving problems you didn't know you had in the most obscure way possible

"And now, it's time to hand this over to our tame race axe driver. Some say, he can live in the forest for six months at a time without food, and he knows of a secret tribe of only women where he is their God. All we know is, he's call the Styx!" - TazzieRob
OCD Squad Leader Admin Team Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,637
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #70 on: December 05, 2017, 02:08:59 PM »
I virtually see no benefit to camo/tactical clothing/gear.
It is great for hunting and I can get the stuff at a military surplus store for a fraction of the cost than what Real Tree and Mossy Oak stuff is going for. I do wish some of the tactical stuff would come in different colors so it does not look so tactical. Some of the stuff is very versatile and practical.
A lot of military equipment is rugged and well made. I too try to find less "tactical" stuff.
Personally, I feel that most civilian gear is better value for the money. Military gear usually is heavy, three generations behind on tech and fairly expensive (they can't sell it cheaper to the civilian, than they do to the military and the military is always overpaying). Hunters, at least around here, like to add some orange to their "camo" because they don't want to be invisible to other humans, just their prey.

That said I think the difference is mindset. Why do you buy military gear. The intention is neither to look tactical nor to have camo, but to have the best gear for the day ahead. The benefit is neither tactical nor camo to you either, the benefit is quality and value.
Either way, at the end of the day, there are two things that matter:
- are you comfortable in the cloth you are wearing / with the gear you are carrying?
- are you comfortable with the image you are projecting?

Emergency Kit: Ovo Sport, chocolate, cheese, crispbread and a coin
No Life Club Posts: 1,981
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #71 on: December 05, 2017, 02:27:39 PM »
Having had to literally run for it with my family from a forest fire which came to 50 yards from the house and having sat in the bomb shelters while rockets fell as well as being cut off by heavy snow in a city totally unequipped for it - I have spent a while thinking about this whole thing.

GHB. I have a 'get home bag'. It's the bag I carry every day to 'get home' with. Unless you are required to cross country to get home, I fail to see what on earth you could need differently should you have to walk. Let's be real. You will be getting home through the city. So extensive fire starter options, tarps, extensive cordage, etc - it's all irrelevant. Silly. I've never understood a GHB build that is in essence a BoB.

Another point. In any kind of SHTF situation you want to be ignored. Passed on by the soldiers or jumpy paramilitary type cops and ignored by the gangs. Tactical anything is beyond stupid. I don't begin to get it. If you want to get out of town in a really hot or tense situation, put your gear into some plastic bags, roll around on the ground till you're filthy and stoop as you walk. Who notices or bothers a tramp?

Gear. Honestly, you don't need all that stuff. No really. My entire personal camping/BoB kit, including sleep, shelter, cooking, hygiene, light, FAK is less than 10 pounds and I carry it in a beat up and dusty messenger bag. If you expect to be comfortable and relaxed while bugging out you are very naively assuming that you are not going to be a prime target for thieving gangs as a result. 10 desperate people thugs vs your glock or AR when you're surprised at night? Don't believe it. They will be armed too.

Bug Out. Are we all alone? No families? No kids? Really? I've got a wife and 3 kids. I can't 'bug out' with gear for all of us in a single backpack. Bugging out for real is far less romantic and far more difficult. After the forest fire incident I rethought out a bunch of stuff to this end.

Where are you going? Are you sure that bugging out is better than bugging in? A city, even a ruined one, will provide far more possibilities for the urbanite, probably far safer than the outdoors as well. Have you scouted routes, planned fail safe if those routes are blocked? Are you sure you will be able to stay at the locations you have chosen, are you sure that if the SHTF your locations will not have already been bombed or napalmed to dust, your water sources contaminated beyond filtration, etc? What are you going to do after 72 hours when your food/gear runs out? Should you not have been on the move constantly trying to get to safety rather than trying to battle it out in the anarchy of what the woods will turn into?

Another thing which I didn't realise until two weeks ago when I was admitted into hospital with a raging infection in my leg caused by a single mosquito bite triggering cellulitis. An infection that a century ago would almost certainly have killed me and I'm still a few years shy of 40. I've been on IV antibiotics for 2 weeks, two surgeries and now 6 weeks more of antibiotics. Without civilisation I would be dead. We do not have the anti body systems to survive as a species long term outdoors without the protection of the group. Neither did our forefathers even in groups given their mortality rates and life expectancy. Be careful of what you wish for. Leaving civilisation behind could be far more 'real' than you could possibly imagine.

« Last Edit: December 05, 2017, 02:35:02 PM by pomsbz »

"It is better to lose health like a spendthrift than to waste it like a miser." - Robert Louis Stevenson
No Life Club Posts: 1,981
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #72 on: December 05, 2017, 02:35:09 PM »
On an aside, still looking for a good cordage option. I find paracord expensive and slippy in knots and don't want tarred line. I saw mention of baling twine. Anyone ever used it?

"It is better to lose health like a spendthrift than to waste it like a miser." - Robert Louis Stevenson
No Life Club Posts: 1,375
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #73 on: December 05, 2017, 02:37:33 PM »
I think that most elaborate bug out bags, get home bags, 72 hour kits, truckloads of concealed carry weapons and EDC are a kind of role playing and escapism. I don't pretend that my EDC is any different. There is my personal narrative behind it. Sure it is also actually useful, but that is likewise a part of the narrative. A story of who I think I am and/or would like to be. If you look at much of these things in this way they make much more sense.  :D

There is no magic therefore gadgets!
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,843 Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, over.
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #74 on: December 05, 2017, 02:53:30 PM »
On an aside, still looking for a good cordage option. I find paracord expensive and slippy in knots and don't want tarred line. I saw mention of baling twine. Anyone ever used it?
Jute twine is great. Also makes a great fire starter. Baling twine is ok too, but after a few uses use need a new piece. Also makes for great fire starter, but be careful,  it is treated to keep bugs and mice away.

Nate

SEND IT!
No Life Club Posts: 1,981
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #75 on: December 05, 2017, 02:59:16 PM »
On an aside, still looking for a good cordage option. I find paracord expensive and slippy in knots and don't want tarred line. I saw mention of baling twine. Anyone ever used it?
Jute twine is great. Also makes a great fire starter. Baling twine is ok too, but after a few uses use need a new piece. Also makes for great fire starter, but be careful,  it is treated to keep bugs and mice away.

Jute is bulky for the strength you get. I don't mind re-usability problems, why would treatment against bugs be a problem? Does it out gas dangerously or something?

"It is better to lose health like a spendthrift than to waste it like a miser." - Robert Louis Stevenson
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,843 Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, over.
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #76 on: December 05, 2017, 03:05:51 PM »
On an aside, still looking for a good cordage option. I find paracord expensive and slippy in knots and don't want tarred line. I saw mention of baling twine. Anyone ever used it?
Jute twine is great. Also makes a great fire starter. Baling twine is ok too, but after a few uses use need a new piece. Also makes for great fire starter, but be careful,  it is treated to keep bugs and mice away.

Jute is bulky for the strength you get. I don't mind re-usability problems, why would treatment against bugs be a problem? Does it out gas dangerously or something?
Only if it burns nothing crazy but still don't breath the smoke.. 20000 baler twine is about the same thickness as jute and 9000 is about twice as thick as 20000 baler twine.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2017, 04:27:32 PM by ducttapetech »

Nate

SEND IT!
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,243 Cats have pocket knives of their own
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #77 on: December 05, 2017, 04:15:38 PM »
On an aside, still looking for a good cordage option.

Dyneema cord. Expensive but pretty strong and it doesn't slip. It still can break at the knots, though.

Another option would be marine use cords. Those things are tough  :salute:

Omnia vincit amor. Vae victis.
No Life Club Posts: 1,981
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #78 on: December 05, 2017, 04:52:51 PM »
On an aside, still looking for a good cordage option.

Dyneema cord. Expensive but pretty strong and it doesn't slip. It still can break at the knots, though.

Another option would be marine use cords. Those things are tough  :salute:

I don't need particularly strong, I currently use 275 paracord to give an idea. I had a tarp up on my balcony all of last winter tied up with 275, lasted months of rain and wind. I just find that knots slip easily with the stuff, the cord doesn't bind into itself very well in the knot.

"It is better to lose health like a spendthrift than to waste it like a miser." - Robert Louis Stevenson
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,621
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #79 on: December 05, 2017, 09:55:42 PM »
On an aside, still looking for a good cordage option. I find paracord expensive and slippy in knots and don't want tarred line. I saw mention of baling twine. Anyone ever used it?
Jute twine is great. Also makes a great fire starter. Baling twine is ok too, but after a few uses use need a new piece. Also makes for great fire starter, but be careful,  it is treated to keep bugs and mice away.

Jute is also biodegradable so even if you leave some behind it isn't a problem

Solving problems you didn't know you had in the most obscure way possible

"And now, it's time to hand this over to our tame race axe driver. Some say, he can live in the forest for six months at a time without food, and he knows of a secret tribe of only women where he is their God. All we know is, he's call the Styx!" - TazzieRob
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,902 Any tool is better than nothing. Some not by much
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #80 on: December 05, 2017, 10:46:04 PM »
Yeah, i'm a pretty big fan of Jute. If it's not strong enough, you can double/triple it. As pointed out, it's biodegradable. It also makes good firestarting material, is super cheap, and readily available.

No Life Club Posts: 1,042

WWW 00

******
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #81 on: December 06, 2017, 12:39:35 AM »
Since we're talking cordage, what is exactly this bankline? I was looking it up and heard someone saying it is some kind of nylon cordage with some sort of coating and that knots don't come undone very easily. The thread exchange states that it is polypropylene and gives many of the usages, but where and how it is traditionally used?
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,902 Any tool is better than nothing. Some not by much
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 18,843 Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, over.
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #83 on: December 06, 2017, 01:31:41 AM »
It is also known as mariners cord and was used on ships back in the day. Only then it was natural cordage and tar was used to protect the cord from water and salt.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2017, 01:33:10 AM by ducttapetech »

Nate

SEND IT!
No Life Club Posts: 1,801 Duck!
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #84 on: December 06, 2017, 05:36:58 AM »
Just a heads up for anyone interested in a good titanium spork; TOAKS offers models with various handle lengths, and the newer ones have polished bowls.
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,902 Any tool is better than nothing. Some not by much
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #85 on: December 06, 2017, 06:06:11 AM »
I think someone got the idea from my original post that I hate sporks. I don't. I hate short handled eating utensils, and unpolished bowls. The long-handled polished TOAKS sporks are fine, IMO.

Just to be clear. :D
No Life Club Posts: 1,801 Duck!
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #86 on: December 06, 2017, 06:14:54 AM »
I think someone got the idea from my original post that I hate sporks. I don't. I hate short handled eating utensils, and unpolished bowls. The long-handled polished TOAKS sporks are fine, IMO.

Just to be clear. :D

I think you made your point well, actually. Just occurred to me that some might not know what some good alternatives are to the less practical options out there.

I own several sporks, but all of mine are plastic. Sea to Summit and Light My Fire models, specifically. They function well enough, and I wash them between uses. But I just use them when I need to pack a lunch somewhere, not so much in the wilderness.
No Life Club Posts: 1,981
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #87 on: December 06, 2017, 07:07:25 AM »
I actually really like my Ti LMF spork. A full spoon and fork on either end. Zero compromises and pleasant to eat with.

"It is better to lose health like a spendthrift than to waste it like a miser." - Robert Louis Stevenson
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 11,621
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #88 on: December 06, 2017, 10:40:45 AM »
I actually really like my Ti LMF spork. A full spoon and fork on either end. Zero compromises and pleasant to eat with.

Never having used an LMF spork, they seem a bit clunky. No awkwardness when you use 'em?

Solving problems you didn't know you had in the most obscure way possible

"And now, it's time to hand this over to our tame race axe driver. Some say, he can live in the forest for six months at a time without food, and he knows of a secret tribe of only women where he is their God. All we know is, he's call the Styx!" - TazzieRob
No Life Club Posts: 3,653
Re: Things I hate in 'Bug Out Bags', or... How to Start an Argument
« Reply #89 on: December 06, 2017, 10:47:40 AM »
Some valid points raised  :salute:

The worst I ever saw somebody's legs kicked out from under him was a reply to the dude's BOB gear list, it was rightly pointed out that he would not even be able to carry the load out of the city in which he resided.....  :facepalm:

I now value the ability to walk long distances more than gear, and my corporate office worker BOB is my EDC, most importantly for the environment I think the money in my little cash stash.....

 

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