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This years projects. 581

No Life Club Posts: 4,400 Geometry cuts but the steel determines how long.
Re: This years projects.
« Reply #30 on: June 20, 2019, 01:12:56 PM »
I hope to own one....or a few  :rofl:.......some day, but this is the first time I thought to myself "GEC could/should do better"  :think:
GEC could do better but I don't know if it's necessary that they should.
On traditional's the only thing that resembles automation is stamping the tang and liners. The rest of the fit and finish is by hand, thats expensive. To do better would be a lot of added cost, that cost might do more harm than good. They are already the best production knife I've seen and that includes the old brands that are no longer.

Really all I did was break in the knife. I could have just used it and in time it would have smoothed out on it's own.

Knives like the Lionsteel barlow and Maserin plow are built with much newer equipment. There quality relies on precision maching that can just be screwed together, with minimal hand fitting.

Traditional purists tend not to like the aesthetics of a screw.

Zombie Apprentice Posts: 12,768
Re: This years projects.
« Reply #31 on: June 20, 2019, 08:33:05 PM »
This Guys a barrel of fun but...



Everything’s adjustable
No Life Club Posts: 4,400 Geometry cuts but the steel determines how long.
Re: This years projects.
« Reply #32 on: June 21, 2019, 02:01:45 PM »
Good video I didn't realize this was a common enough problem to find youtube videos on it.
Find a floor supply and some smooth tile and get them to cut it, a little PC-7 epoxy might be all it takes.

Zombie Apprentice Posts: 12,768
Re: This years projects.
« Reply #33 on: June 21, 2019, 06:09:16 PM »

 :tu:

I spend far too much time on the interweb  ::)

Everything’s adjustable
No Life Club Posts: 4,400 Geometry cuts but the steel determines how long.
Re: This years projects.
« Reply #34 on: June 21, 2019, 07:31:43 PM »
You found some useful info. Thanks  :salute:

No Life Club Posts: 4,400 Geometry cuts but the steel determines how long.
Re: This years projects.
« Reply #35 on: June 22, 2019, 02:13:25 AM »
RE ground the Rat 2's this morning, these knives were about .023 Behind The Edge. Well that's not bad for a modern knife but it's not good geometry for a knife used as a knife. With the thin blade stock it could be better.
They're about .015 BTE now and they are excellent cutters.

I tried to as an experiment and ground the R2-D2 to 220 grit but it gets difficult on the harder steels to get the 400 grit marks off. Lesson learned I went back to 400 grit and I think it looks better that way, it is after all a $35 knife.




No Life Club Posts: 3,059
Re: This years projects.
« Reply #36 on: June 22, 2019, 08:36:34 AM »
RE ground the Rat 2's this morning, these knives were about .023 Behind The Edge. Well that's not bad for a modern knife but it's not good geometry for a knife used as a knife. With the thin blade stock it could be better.
They're about .015 BTE now and they are excellent cutters.

I tried to as an experiment and ground the R2-D2 to 220 grit but it gets difficult on the harder steels to get the 400 grit marks off. Lesson learned I went back to 400 grit and I think it looks better that way, it is after all a $35 knife.
(Image removed from quote.)

(Image removed from quote.)


That's great job!  I just measured my 91mm SAK, and it's about 0.015 BTE.  I could imagine being a much bigger blade, 0.023 BTE probably won't make it as good as a slicer, and improvement should be very noticeable afterwards.  :tu:   This is a territory I really want to learn more about as a knife enthusiast, I could touchup/sharpen/reprofile a blade edge ok, but making that primary grind is something I totally lack experience of.


Btw, R2-D2, what a cool name for this value knife. :like:
No Life Club Posts: 4,400 Geometry cuts but the steel determines how long.
Re: This years projects.
« Reply #37 on: June 22, 2019, 06:09:14 PM »
That's great job!  I just measured my 91mm SAK, and it's about 0.015 BTE.  I could imagine being a much bigger blade, 0.023 BTE probably won't make it as good as a slicer, and improvement should be very noticeable afterwards.  :tu:   This is a territory I really want to learn more about as a knife enthusiast, I could touchup/sharpen/reprofile a blade edge ok, but making that primary grind is something I totally lack experience of.


Btw, R2-D2, what a cool name for this value knife. :like:

To do it takes nerve, or confidence or a lack of common sense, I have plenty of the last.  :rofl:

This is my entire modern collection, minus the two Rat's.
The Bugout, Freek & Smith & sons are the thickest BTE at .019, the Mini Barrage & Saibu are .016, the red & black wasp is under .015.
The Bugout has become afraid of grinders and for good reason, it's got a good sized blade and is lighter than many knives half it's size.
It's just asking for a regrind, I do like a knife that cuts well.

 

No Life Club Posts: 3,059
Re: This years projects.
« Reply #38 on: June 22, 2019, 07:07:02 PM »
To do it takes nerve, or confidence or a lack of common sense, I have plenty of the last.  :rofl:

This is my entire modern collection, minus the two Rat's.
The Bugout, Freek & Smith & sons are the thickest BTE at .019, the Mini Barrage & Saibu are .016, the red & black wasp is under .015.
The Bugout has become afraid of grinders and for good reason, it's got a good sized blade and is lighter than many knives half it's size.
It's just asking for a regrind, I do like a knife that cuts well.
(Image removed from quote.)
 

Regardless the formula, look how well it works though!  :D


These are all pretty good purchase, many of which are classics. :tu:   I am just slowly learning how to mod my SAKs, and should I know how to grind, that will probably open so many doors to endless MT modding fun... >:D 
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 8,355
Re: This years projects.
« Reply #39 on: June 22, 2019, 07:25:31 PM »
I see a Cypress in that bunch ol'knives. I didn't know you had one of those. Smith has only done or two  :think:  runs of those. Good score. What your assessment of it?

What? Enablers! Are you serrrrious? Where? I dont see any.

Hold Fast
No Life Club Posts: 4,400 Geometry cuts but the steel determines how long.
Re: This years projects.
« Reply #40 on: June 23, 2019, 03:57:46 PM »
I see a Cypress in that bunch ol'knives. I didn't know you had one of those. Smith has only done or two  :think:  runs of those. Good score. What your assessment of it?

I got this shortly before I swore off new knives for the year, I blame the purchase on all the Buck 110 & 112 chatter here. The moderns get carried as the second knife regularly but I don't post the moderns very often. I was never able to talk my self into a Buck 112, so this is what I decided on instead.

It's 1/8th” longer & 1.5 to 2.0 ounces lighter than a standard 112. It's all steel so it has a very substantial feel to it and all the steel inside and out has a well done stone wash finish. The stone wash gives the liners and back spacer a small radius so there are no sharp edges. The handle is large enough and has a very comfortable feel without any hot spots and the G10 is well executed. No texture is needed on the handle. The tang rides low and mostly hidden with a rediused corner that won't eat pockets.

Blade is .115 at the spine substantial enough to do what knives are made to do with out being a wedge. I never use the pocket clip but it is an excellent clip. There is enough of a rise that it easily slides over  pocket seams, enough tension to hold it and the G10 won't eat your pocket's.

I use mine a lot for recycling cardboard and 2 gal plastic cat litter jugs the D2 seems to hold an edge well.  If sharpening is any indication the heat treat was good.

If you've ever read many knife reviews you'll see a sentence or paragraph on ergo's, steel, materials etc and 3 or 4 paragraphs on deployment. Well I could don't give a smurfs patoot about deployment. Lock up is excellent with the liner stopping just where it should. The liner spring is strong and that's where the whip out and deploy with a resounding clank crowd will not like this knife. The combination of strong liner tension and a light blade do not make for a good whip out and deploy action.

I'm not part of that crowd, I open knives I do not deploy my knives. So this knife suits me perfectly. I'm one of those slowly roll it open and deliberately one hand roll it closed kind of people.

The thumb stud is positioned well back on the tang and not in the way when cutting.

The first complaint I have is the stud should be a bit thicker and longer, it is a bit small. The second complaint is the combination of a strong liner spring and a deep detent and it was hard to open. For a couple weeks I pondered whether to send it back or fix it. You know me I decided to fix it and send a note to Smith and Sons. I used it for a couple weeks to let the detent ball rub the tang and leave a light mark. I used a 600 grit tapered diamond file the ones sold for serrated blades and made 4 light passes followed by 800 wet/dry paper on a toothpick. It's an easy knife to disassemble and put back together.

If you can fix the opening detent it's an excellent knife. If you want a fidget flipper you won't be happy with it.
The more I use it the happier I am with it, this knife will not be sold off.








 

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