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Gerber Episodes. 11575

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Gerber Episodes.
« on: March 25, 2016, 01:47:04 PM »
Episode 1 - Gerber Military Provisional Tool (MPT)

Leatherman came out with its iconic Pocket Survival Tool (PST) back in 1983. That tool has changed the multi-tool market ever since. There were older models than the PST and one could not claim that the PST was the first butterfly style folding plier based multi-tool ever created...but it most certainly made a large impact on the multi-tool market when first introduced.

You might be wondering why I am starting this little Gerber episode off with mention of the Leatherman PST. Well, back in the 90's, Gerber went head to head with Leatherman for a military contract. Now my meager research indicated that military contract was for the USMC. Gerber made the odd looking MPT to compete with the PST. Surprisingly enough they won that contract with the MPT. I do not know the numbers, but apparently these were issued to a few good men and women in the US Marine Corp. One could think of this as the forefather that paved the long relationship Gerber and the US military have enjoyed ever since with the various MP600 BO versions.

Now to beat the PST, Gerber came out with a tool that is very much similar to its competition. In doing so, the Gerber MPT is a very odd duck in the Gerber Lineup. It looks like nothing Gerber has produced before or since. With that said, the MPT is definitely a very dated design.

The MPT did one thing better than the PST design wise. The issue with the Leatherman PST was always the handles that dug into the palm whenever you applied any amount of force on the pliers. The Gerber MPT fixed that by rolling the edges that comes in contact with your palm. At the price of a slightly thicker body, you gain exponentially in ergonomics. With that said, the MPT was never considers one of Gerber's top end designs. It was a model designed to go head to head with the PST. Eventually, models were made for the civilian market.

I must say, I appreciate the clean lines of the older multi-tools. I am a big fan of the Leatherman PST, and the MPT fits right in there in the looks department. Being highly polished and slablike in form, the MPT is a looker. Its looks do belly its functionality however, as more modern MTs run circles around this tool.

Look at those rolled edges...comfort right there.


The tool load-out of the MPT was very similar to its main competitor the PST. It featured one less physical tool, but the cap lifter did double duty as a small flat head screwdriver, negating much of the advantage, if any, of the PST.



A closer look at those rolled edges.


No locking mechanism on the MPT. At the time, the competition didn't feature these either.


The pliers are unique in the Gerber line.


Now the MPT was never designed to be a top quality multi-tool. In fact, many including myself believed it to be an economical tool found in the Gerber lineup. Quite often, the handles wouldn't fit flush with each other, among other various minor fit issues. However, looking back at these older multi-tools, there is just something about polished stainless steel with nice curves in the creases, etc...that is very attractive. Lets just say for a cheaply made tool, the stamping is top rate, as are the edge bends.



I also have a weird hydro painted MPT. The finish is rather fragile, but it does make for a striking looker.





For more information, please look at our resident encyclopedia entry here...

http://wiki.multitool.org/tiki-index.php?page=MPT



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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2016, 02:17:39 PM »
Episode 2 - Gerber Multiplier First Production Run

Gerber has been an interesting company product wise in terms of multi-tools. Fiskars bought out Gerber Legendary Blades back in 1987, thus all of Gerber's multi-tools were produced as a subsidiary of Fiskars. This will come to play in future Episodes.

With that said, back in the early 90's, Gerber/Fiskars started to look at the multi-tool market. Leatherman had a big head start with their PST which was introduced back in 1983. Many companies wanted a piece of the lucrative multi-tool market, and Gerber was no different. They introduced this very early version of their much popular Multiplier family of multi-tools. This First Production Run Multi-Plier was based on a unique concept of having the pliers slide up and down inside the body. That made their design unique and different from the competition. This tool was the forefather of the now very popular MP400 and MP600 series.

This is a very dated example. Look at the lack of tool locks (those came afterwards), the polished stainless steel, and the well defined stamping. I am unsure of the intro date, as unlike Leatherman, Gerber never bothered to stamp dates on their tools, but I would hazard a guess at a production date of around 1991 to 1993. This Gerber is a very early example of things to come.



The Multi-Plier's biggest design feature was the unique sliding pliers. The patent ran out in the last few years, allowing Leatherman to come out with the OHT. One could think of the OHT as an homage to the venerable Gerber design.



The tool load-out was surprisingly good. Just the right amount of flat drivers, along with two blades and a very nice pair of scissors. What is odd about the First Production Run was that Gerber seriously messed up on the nail nick locations. If you have a copy of the First Production Run Multi-Plier, then you can see that extracting some of the tools is more difficult than it should be. I am happy to say this is the only Gerber multi-tool that shows this issue. They quickly fixed this after the first run got out the door.



Gerber was rightfully proud of this tool...



An early model that is rough around the edges...but showed the potential which later models and revisions built upon.


The "First Production Run" is only stamped on the one side.



One thing Gerber hadn't figured out yet in this early production model...was the handle geometry. Many folks call the older Multi-Plier models as mister Pinchy. This First Production Run illustrates the issue and the dangers to your palms if you were not careful.



Regardless, this tool ushered in a new era for Gerber with their iconic sliding pliers design.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2016, 02:19:39 PM by Chako »

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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2016, 03:58:48 PM »
:popcorn: I love these threads. The history of tools makes really good reads. Thanks for taking the time to do this. I have really come to appreciate Gerber's core offerings. And the oho pliers have spoiled me more than I would like to admit. Looking forward to more episodes. :tu:

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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2016, 05:33:07 PM »
Episode 3 - Gerber MultiPlier

I have always found that my knowledge is lacking when it comes to the older Gerbers. The two that I will be talking about in this episode are what J-sews aka Bob, stated was a version 5. From what little I know, the version 5 of the MultiPlier was the last version before the MultiPlier 600 (originally called the Multi Lock) rolled out in 1998. I also believe this is the first Gerber that featured a needle nose plier. All previous versions were blunt nosed.

If you compare the version 1 "First Run" mentioned in episode 2 to this version 5, you can see the extent of generational improvements that the MultiPlier family offered.

Notice that when closed, the handle gap is wider than that found on the first generation.



5th Generation blunt nose MultiPlier.


The scissors from the first generation are now removed by this time and replaced by a file.



Both handles are stamped with the following patent numbers. Note the rivets used on the pliers slide mechanism.



Plier pivot point.



An inside look of a version 5 MultiPlier focusing on the sliding plier mechanism.



That is it for the blunt nose, what follows is the first needlenose MultiPlier offered to the public.



Note that by version 5, they had designed the pliers/sliding mechanism/handles to give a wider gap, thereby eliminating the older versions pinchy characteristics. I do not know what version the change was implemented at...but by version 5, that pinched palm issue was mostly fixed.







Gerber's first needlenose installation model...setting the stage for the ever popular MultiPlier 600.



If you look very closely, you can see that the needlenose pliers example offers a slightly larger handle gap than the blunt nose plier. Just an observation.

This ends this installment of episode 3.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2016, 06:25:59 PM by Chako »

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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2016, 06:46:51 PM »
Really great bunch of history there Chako :cheers: The MPT is very nice :drool: I guess because it is so much like the PST that I like it :D This post was right up there with some of the stuff J-sews (Bob) use to do and I very much enjoyed reading it :tu:

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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2016, 07:03:40 PM »
Wow Chako! This is an excellent idea for a thread, and I'm loving it so far. :tu:  Add a couple more models and I think I'll make this a sticky.

There's no such thing as "Too pretty to carry".  There's only "Too pretty NOT to carry"...... >:D
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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2016, 08:28:16 PM »
Wow Chako! This is an excellent idea for a thread, and I'm loving it so far. :tu:  Add a couple more models and I think I'll make this a sticky.
I vote sticky thread as well

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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2016, 08:34:08 PM »
Great thread Dan :tu:

 I remember being obsessed by Gerber when I first joined partly because they were in abundance here in the UK and compared to their rivals were significantly cheaper.....win win  :tu:
After having purchased most of the models that were available here in the UK, I quickly realised what was available across the pond on eBay  :ahhh  :drool: :drool:
With the help of many members here my Gerber collection just exploded  :D

Back then - we're only talking 4yrs ago!!, there seemed to be a never ending supply of unusual models offered up continuously.... In fact the biggest problem was having the money to buy.
What a difference 4yrs makes, I haven't followed Gerber much for the past couple of years, been too busy grabbing Wengers  :facepalm: but occasionally I look to see if there's anything unusual being offered but it seems to be just a steady never-ending stream of the usual models with maybe the odd mr.pinchy offered up.

Missed out on a First Production Run MP600 (Grey locking release tabs) that was offered up here on the forums trade section a few years back, needless to say I've been hoping to land one for my own collection  ever since.

Something to keep me on my toes I suppose !

I don't claim to know it all, but what I do know is right.
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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2016, 08:34:32 PM »
Episode 4 - Fiskars MultiPlier

Back in 1987, Fiskars bought out Gerber Legendary Blades. One could say that although Gerber was the force behind the designs, Fiskar was the parent company. Thus, it should not be any surprise that the MultiPier should also bear Fiskars' name.

What I do know is that this is not a version 1, nor is it a version 5. This pair of Fiskars stamped MultiPliers are somewhere in between. If I was to hazard a guess, I would say these are closer to the version 5 than they are to the version 1. Maybe a version 3 or 4 but with no clear information that I could find, I am only guessing here. I couldn't find much about these older Gerbers, and what little I could discern comes from MT.O. No surprise there.

I do know I am fortunate to have a pair of Fiskars MultiPliers however.

Note the handle gap. I do know that the version 2 was very much like the version 1 in terms of a lack of gap. The older pliers form makes me think this is more in line with the version 3 of the MultiPlier. Stickily conjecture here.



Note the older style pliers.





The tool load-out is somewhat similar with version 1 in that it has the old style Gerber Awl.





Note the lack of scissors though.



A closer look at the Patent numbers which are stamped on both handles. Also note the two retaining screws for the pliers sliding assembly. You could tighten these up with the proper hex key.



To sum this up, Fiskars, Gerber's parent company did indeed have Fiskars labeled MultiPliers. However, they didn't seem to continue this line...not sure if they feared watering down the name, or competing with their own product. Either way, having a MultiPlier with the Fiskars name on it is a little neat. Not something you see everyday.


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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2016, 08:37:28 PM »
I agree Tosh. Gerber is a nice part of my overall collection, but I never felt the need to hunt down every single variation. I have seen a few larger collections out there, and it would rival my Leatherman collection if I did try to get them all. Happy to say I am not that insane yet.  :D


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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2016, 09:46:38 PM »
Episode 5 - Carolina Knife and Tool

I know there have been a lot of confusion on who exactly produced the Carolina Knife and Tool. We know that Fiskars bought Gerber Legendary Blades back in 1987. We also know that during the development stages or should that be the evolutionary stages of the sliding pliers MultiPlier model, Fiskars branded a few Gerbers. I firmly believe these came from the Gerber factory as they are marked U.S.A. With that said, Fiskars wanted to also have an econo version produced offshore. This company is called Carolina Knife and Tool.

Before we go into greater details, just be aware that Carolina Knife and Tool has also been known to package some really cheap designs that are not based on Gerber MultiPliers. You can find some boxed sets that have no relationship with Gerber whatsoever.

My first Carolina Knife and Tool multi-tool is actually a very nice and well made item. Mind you, this was bought new in the mid to late 90s. One thing to know is that the older made models are of higher quality than the newer ones. This first Carolina Tool fooled me for the longest time, as I thought it was produced by Gerber in the US. For a while, I didn't clue into the fact that if it was, it would have had USA stamped somewhere on the body. Regardless, this is a good quality piece especially compared to the later offerings. It should also be pointed that these Carolina branded models have outlasted the original Gerber MultiPlier variants in that you can still find a Carolina branded model, albeit of a much lower quality, new. More on that later.

The first Carolina Tool that was bought new. I know I am personally attracted to polished stainless steel, and well manufactured tools. This hits all those points, and thus is my favorite of the lot.



The pliers are a little different from the Gerber made MultiPliers.



The tools are comparable to the Gerbers in design and quality.



The quality of the stamping is just below what you would see on a Gerber branded product. Not by much however. This of course take a serious drop in the newer and far cheaply made Carolina branded tools. Note the two flat screwdriver bolts used to hold the sliding pliers mechanism.



Not bad actually.



A closer look at that odd pliers jaws.



the next model bought showed a marked departure from the older tool. However, this is not as bad as it gets. The stamping on the tool is still rather nice and crisp.



Note the newer pliers design found on this second model.



This model also lacks a serrated blade.



Differences also continue in the sliding pliers mechanism. Note that instead of the two flat headed bolts, we now have a rivet and a Phillips head book-ending the button.



You can see a deterioration in the stamping. I should also add that all Carolina Tools have the patent numbers stamped on only one handle, not the two as seen with Gerber models.



Here is the third and newest addition to this family. It is also the cheapest in fit and finish.



Note the different font used to stamp Carolina Knife and Tool on the handle. Worse yet, it is not an even stamping.



The tool Load-out is the same as the above with a few quality dips throughout.



If you look at the backside of the rivets, you can see they aren't exactly uniform.



This cheapest of examples is also the only one to have the place of manufacture stamped on the inside of a handle.



Note also that the rivet lacks finishing, showing a bit of the sprue on the sliding pliers assembly.



My last of this family is a Winchester branded Fisherman. The Gerber MP600 Fisherman came out in 2001, thus I can only assume this came out later than that date. It is without doubt a product of the Carolina Knife and Tool company.



Gerber designed Fisherman models all have an overly long set of pliers that jut out of the multi-tool when stowed away. This Winchester model is no different.



This model also features a serrated blade that follows the Gerber serrated blade pattern of the day.



This later tool also shows the lack of finish as evinced by the sprue on the rivet of the sliding assembly mechanism.



In this Episode, we have taken a closer look at those Carolina Knife and Tool models that are based upon Gerber Multi-Plier design. These Carolina models are all built cheaper than those made from Gerber in the United States. You could also say that the older produced models are of higher quality than those of more recent production. Either way, You can still find the more recent model new online and at a few stores. With that said, Carolina Knife and Tool multi-tools are a subsidiary company of the parent company Fiskars, and this is why I tend to store these tools with the Gerbers in my collection. They are related by design and company. They are a fascinating offshoot.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2016, 12:38:53 AM by Chako »

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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #11 on: March 25, 2016, 10:35:55 PM »
Episode 6 - Paul Chen Multitasker

(Not related to the AR weapons support Multitasker series)

This next model is a rather unusual one. Meet the Paul Chen Multitasker. This tool, produced in China, is a Paul Chen design based upon the Gerber sliding pliers design. If you are wondering, Paul Chen is a fairly well known knife blade designer for Hanwai Swords.

Fiskars marketed this as the Fiskars Excalibur Multi-Snipe. There was also a similar tool called a Zibermann tool which appears to be also produced by the same factory...but unsure if there was any Fiskars tie in other than the general Gerber sliding pliers design.

See the Zibermann tool thread here: http://forum.multitool.org/index.php?topic=3791.0

The Paul Chen Multitasker has Professional laser etched onto the one handle. The tool features a Victorinox like pliers that pivots 180 degrees. It is an odd design, as the pliers fold on top of the tool.





On the back side, a very nice pocket-clip.



The snipes slide out and are beefy in size and thickness.



This tool is surprisingly thick for the tools carried. There is a liner locked knife blade nested in the one handle, and a fold out non-locking saw in the other handle. The second handle also has a removable file that locks in place around a pivot point.





A close up of the sliding pliers assembly mechanism.



A relatively small set of pliers is also included on the tool.



I store the Paul Chen Multitasker with the rest of the Gerber collection due to the Fiskars tie in and general design. This one is an interesting tool, and due to its bulk and toolset, is mostly of interest to collectors.






« Last Edit: March 25, 2016, 10:39:35 PM by Chako »

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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #12 on: March 26, 2016, 01:10:32 AM »
Episode 7 - MultiPlier 400/450 Compact

Coming out one year after the MultiPlier 600, the MP400 Compact is a very popular multi-tool due to its size, weight, and functionality. Unlike the MP600, the MP400 comes in a limited variety. The MP400 was first introduced in 1999.

The MP400 is quite easy to differentiate from its larger sibling via the handle ventilation cutouts. The MP400 is also only stamped on the one side of the tool.



Much like the MP600, the MP400 features locking tools via two large plastic locking levers. Push them against an internal spring to unlock. The locking levers are wider and also textured for easier grip.



The MP400 features a more modern pliers head. As far as I know, there are no MP400 models with removable cutters.



This is the standard tool load-out for the MP400. The scissors are actually quite good, heads and shoulders above those found in the first generation Multi-plier.



Here is the tool load-out of the MP450. Basically, an MP400 with a file instead of scissors, a differen Phillips driver, and a different shaped main knife blade. Externally, they both look the same when closed up.



This variant is called the MP400 Advertiser. One side of the tool has no ventilation cutouts in the handles. This allows room for a billboard space for companies to place their logos and names on it. The far side looks like your average MP400.



This variant is called the MP400 Corkscrew. This one is interesting as one handle has a cutout to fit the corkscrew.



The MP400 Corkscrew replaces the file with a corkscrew. The knife blade in this photo is still in the handle folded away.



Another variant is the MP400 Fisherman. This tool not only features the longer fisherman pliers, but a different tool load-out.



Differences from your average run of the mill MP400 are the inclusion of fixed tweezers, a file with a hook groove (on the hidden side), and an awl.



The MP400 also comes in a black oxide version. Notice the different blade shape to the stainless steel version at the start of this episode.



Gerber also produced a special MP400 Terminator 3 model that features a differently shaped blade, and a different handle marking.



BO MP400 on top, special commemorative T3 version on the bottom.


Overall, the MP400 is a nice multi-tool that features a lot of functionality in an easy to carry package. The MP400 along with the MP600 are some of Gerbers best sellers.


« Last Edit: March 26, 2016, 04:12:35 PM by jerseydevil »

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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #13 on: March 26, 2016, 01:35:20 AM »
What  a great , valuable contribution to this forum
Thanks again Chako!
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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #14 on: March 26, 2016, 05:49:48 AM »
Episode 8 - Gerber MultiPlier 600 (MP600)

1998 was a banner year for Gerber. That was when the MP600 rolled out. At first called the Multi-Lock, the MP600 ushered in a vast armada of variations. These range from different pliers down to the various tools included. I only have a few models, and those are the ones I will illustrate for you, but be aware that there are many variations, and most of them fall under the MP600 designation with not a model name to differentiate one from another...that is how it seems to me.

This is the general profile of the MP600.







Multi-Lock Woodsman

This is an early model that includes a removable saw. A little different from the later models that usually comes with a RemGrit blade.



MP600 Pro Scout

This version is fairly feature rich with a removable RemGrit blade. My copy has that style of knife, but with the whole MP600 line, the shape and style of the blade may be different in another Pro Scout. There is even a Camo Pro Scout.





MP600 Basic

Just as it says, the basic model.



MP600 Fisherman

Much like its smaller sibling the MP400 Fisherman, this multi-tool features a very long set of pliers. Likewise, the MP600 Fisherman also comes with a lanyard.



Carbide cutters, an awl, and a fishing hook sharpening groove on the file round out the fisherman's features.



MP600 Cable Cutter

Another odd duck. Replace the pliers with a pair of cable cutters.



BO MP600

There are several variations of the MP600 in black oxide. This version has a sheeps foot blade that appears to be common on military geared Gerbers. This variant also features removable carbide cutters, and blunt nosed pliers. Likewise, these BO MP600 versions are common with military packs. I have others that came with OTIS firearm cleaning kits, and other military kits. Many of these may have slight variations from one another.



A slightly different variation. Note the needle nose pliers and removable carbide cutters. Also of interest, no file nail cutout as seen in the above variant.



MP600 Operation Iraqi Freedom

Here is a special MP600 to commemorate the war with Iraq. Operation Iraqi Freedom started in 2003, placing this variant sometime after that date. Note the nail cutouts on all longer tools.



Build Your Own Gerber Program MP600

For a time, Gerber allowed you to customize your own MP600. There were six colours on tap (white, blue, yellow, red, green, and orange), and of course the options of using a basic or Pro Scout model. Mix that with black or stainless innards, and you got yourself some variety. I think the Operation Iraqi Freedom listed above as part of this program. Likewise, I recall J-sews stating that the yellow and red only came in a combo pack with a flashlight.



MP600 ST

Here is a military specific MP600. The ST stands for sight, as in, you can maintain and sight in your firearm. The tool load-out for this one is different from all the other MP600s out there. This model is easy to ID front and back as each side has a cut out for one of the specialized tools.





You get a sight adjustment tool, and extra long Phillips driver, and a carbon scraper to round out the tool specialization.



MP600 DET

Another military tool, this time geared towards folks that like to blow stuff up. The MP600 DET has a cap crimper pliers head and a nice C4 spike.



Note that the C4 spike only protruded on one side of the tool. The back side does not look like anything special.


The MP600 DET also features a removable RemGrit blade.



A closer look at the cap crimper head.



Of interest, the MP600 DET also had a very dishonest fake out there. The fake is simply painted black as opposed to having a real black oxide finish. Likewise, the USA is not stamped into the body but simply silk screened on the handle. The differences don't stop there. The fake does not have a removable saw blade...and the whole thing is cheaply built.

Fake on top, real on the bottom.



Here is the fake. Note the white USA lettering, the general black painted parts, the lack of a removable saw blade. If you look really closely, you can tell that some of the tools are a little off in shape.



Well, that was quite the slog. As you can see, there are plenty of different MP600 variations out there. The MP600 is a favorite of many, and is one of Gerber's longest and best selling multi-tools.

« Last Edit: March 26, 2016, 05:57:49 AM by Chako »

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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #15 on: March 26, 2016, 06:33:42 AM »
Episode 9 - Gerber MultiPlier 650 Evolution (MP650)

The MP650 Evolution came out in 2002. Someone over at Gerber figured that it might be cool to be able to exchange the pliers. That came with the cost of having to store the various plier heads, along with the inability of folding the tool into a smaller and easier package to carry around. You see, the MP650 cannot fold away.

Likewise, there were two variants of the MP650. I like to think of them as the civilian and military version. The civilian version does not feature spring loaded pliers. The Military version does...but it does this with a piece of spring steel attached to each inner handle. They bridge together and keep the jaws open slightly. Likewise, the MP650 came in a Military Tech Kit. This kit came in a very large zippered pouch that can be attached to a belt or webbing. Along with the spring loaded body, you also get 4 different plier heads (cable cutter, cap crimper, blunt nose, and needle nose) that do not feature replacable carbide cutters. There is also a Fisherman pliers head that does feature removable cutters. I know of only these 5 plier heads.

Notice that the internals are much like the MP600 Pro Scout.



Here are the two different MP650 bodies.



Here is the Military Tech Kit with the largish pouch on the left, along with the 5 different heads and 2 bodies. Note that I have an extra blunt head for the second body.



A closer look at the different bodies.



A closer look at the base of the plier head. It would appear they are standard pliers heads with slight modifications, if any, to make them interchangeable.





The MP650 Evolution is basically a modified MP600 that allows the interchangeability of the pliers. Simply press in the two spring catches on the body and push the pliers in until it snaps in place. To remove the pliers, press the two spring catches and pull away on the pliers. A unique concept in the multi-tool industry. A great idea let down somewhat in execution. The hallmark for a multi-tool is something that folds upon itself for ease of carry. The MP650 couldn't, and thus was a chore to carry in the field.

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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #16 on: March 26, 2016, 12:33:46 PM »
Chako,

Thank you for some very informative posts (and great photos as usual  :tu: )

If I may add to it, here is a link to a post I did a while back on the early Multi-Pliers (Mr Pinchy) in case anyone wants more details on the differences between the various versions (1-5) :

http://forum.multitool.or....msg928733.html#msg928733

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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #17 on: March 26, 2016, 01:48:40 PM »
Does anyone know where the numbers came from? 400, 600......

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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #18 on: March 26, 2016, 05:40:23 PM »
Thanks Chako :tu: This has been very helpful for me to be able to see the different tools that Gerber has to offer and the different types of plier heads :cheers:

I am gonna hunt for a couple of these different models and give Gerber a try if I can find the ones I want with the tools I want and these will be a good reference for me to get started looking with :D

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Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #19 on: March 26, 2016, 05:54:45 PM »
Wow Chako! This is an excellent idea for a thread, and I'm loving it so far. :tu:  Add a couple more models and I think I'll make this a sticky.
I vote sticky thread as well

+1000

Great work Dan...thanks for putting this info out there.   :2tu:

"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they go."    -Will Rogers
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 16,240 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #20 on: March 26, 2016, 06:36:08 PM »
I searched high and low on this web site for that information gregozedobe. Thanks for linking it.

No worries. I have just basically wrapped up one and a little bit of a second drawer so far. I plan on running through my Gerber collection in its entirety. So stay tuned for more later. I think when I am done, this will be one massively long thread.

Can't wait to hear how you will get along with your Gerber(s) in the future Poncho65.

Demel, I have no idea how they came up with their model naming.

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Global Moderator Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 10,526 Join us! Embrace the Flicky Faith!
Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #21 on: March 26, 2016, 06:48:08 PM »
By the power vested in me by his Highness Grant Lamontagne, I declare this post stickied. :)

There's no such thing as "Too pretty to carry".  There's only "Too pretty NOT to carry"...... >:D
Full Member Posts: 239 What does Marcellus Wallace look like?
Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #22 on: March 26, 2016, 07:26:21 PM »
What  a great , valuable contribution to this forum
Thanks again Chako!


I have never posted with my own quote in it,  to my recollection, but...

I was raving about this presentation, and it was not even DONE yet!

Outstanding post Chako

He went from the recording studio to a  Platinum album, like overnight!
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 16,240 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #23 on: March 27, 2016, 12:02:21 AM »
Episode 10 - Gerber Multi-Lite

Introduced in 1998, the Gerber Multi-Lite offered an alternative to a pliers based multi-tool. The concept never really took off, and the end of production occurred in the early 2000s. This is an old and somewhat dated design, although I have seen a few other similar designs, especially from Utica Kutmaster.

There were two main models, although I have read there may be as many as 4 variations of the Multi-Lite. Going from this link, I have the two main models in my collection (corkscrew and removable saw).

https://7090a624-a-78e87c...n2PICC&attredirects=0

Now, I do like the Multi-Lite. There is a lid compartment which contains a small flat driver, a toothpick, and a pair of tweezers. Along with the compartment, there is an anemic yellow/amber/orange LED lamp that runs off of a single CR1620 button cell. The light is not strong by any stretch of the imagination. However with that said, there is enough light to get you into your house in the dark.

The Gerber Multi-Lite came in mostly two colours. The black lid for the saw, and green for the corkscrew.



Here is the corkscrew model, with the saw model showing the bottom side with the locking instructions stamped into the metal. The side cutouts is a design feature of the MP400...showing a little design continuity. The 3 tools that are stowed in the lid are also shown in this photograph.



Here are the two variations I have in my collection. Note that the saw is the same as that seen in the Gerber Multi-Lock Woodsman.



Side profile.



To access the battery, simply pull off the rubber cover.



Yes, i am a fan of the Multi-Lite because of its quirkiness. It does manage to pack a lot of tools into a boxy envelope. No pliers included, but then that was the idea.

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Global Moderator Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 10,526 Join us! Embrace the Flicky Faith!
Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #24 on: March 27, 2016, 12:19:44 AM »
I've always thought the Multi-Lite was neat as well.  I've carried and used mine a number of times. Mine's the corkscrew model. :tu:

There's no such thing as "Too pretty to carry".  There's only "Too pretty NOT to carry"...... >:D
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 16,240 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #25 on: March 27, 2016, 12:39:30 AM »
Episode 11 - Gerber Keystyle

Here is an odd little keychain tool. I can't seem to find any information of when it was introduced, but I would wager it would be early to mid 2000s. This tool is now discontinued.

I have the Green Marble Keystyle. It certainly is a pretty tool featuring an iridescent Gerber logo, even though the photos do it no justice.



Odd in that it basically mimics a Victorinox Classic in an overly fat form factor. Where the Victorinox Classic is very sleek and pocket-able, the Gerber Keystyle is anything but. The tools slide in and out via a separate sliding lock mechanism for each tool except for the Fiskars scissors which for some unknown reason, do not have a locking mechanism. The scissors also have the distinction of being the only traditional swing out tool on the Keystyle.

the backside of the Keystyle showing the sliding and locking channels for each tool. To unlock a fully deployed tool, simply press down on the little black button and slide it back into the Keystyle. It works ok and is easier to use than to describe.



How big is this thing you may be asking yourself? Here is a side profile of the Keystyle. I would rather pocket a Victorinox Classic any day...which may explain this products relatively short production life.



The Keystyle features a small Phillips driver, a small flat head driver, a small knife blade, a small pair of scissors, and a removable toothpick.





The Keystyle does not offer anything over a Victorinox Classic. other than a much larger profile. Short tools and a fiddly design relegates this one more to a collectors shelf than as a user. One thing that the Keystyle has going for it, it is pretty enough to EDC this at a black tie party or some other formal affair.

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Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 16,240 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #26 on: March 27, 2016, 12:40:26 AM »
Likewise jerseydevil. I have a soft spot for the Multi-Lite.

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Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 16,240 Armed with camera and not afraid to use it.
Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #27 on: March 27, 2016, 01:02:25 AM »
Episode 12 - Gerber 500 Recoil

This unique tool was introduced in 2003. Not sure who at Gerber thought that spring loaded pliers was a good idea, but there must have been enough consensus to put this somewhat dangerous tool into production. I say dangerous because the spring action is very powerful. So powerful, that I have found that the easiest way to put the pliers back into the handle is to jam the jaws on a solid surface and push hard until you hear the locking mechanism click. I jokingly call this "arming the pliers". I am not far off however with that statement.



To deploy the pliers, slide the circular selector from safe to ready, and press that button. To close up the tool again, push the pliers back into the tool and slide the selector back to safe.



The Recoil only has 4 fold out tools. You have your Fiskars scissors, a sheep foot knife blade, a combo flat driver/can opener/wire stripper, and a combo Phillips driver/bottle opener/wire cutter. The rest of the body contains a very strong spring.



The fold out tools do have a locking mechanism.



The danger zone.



What can I say about the Recoil. I think this is a very playable model. If you like to flick and fiddle with multi-tools, a Recoil is almost a needed model. It is dangerous however. the speed those pliers come out is amazing, and the amount of force required to push the pliers back into the body is a little frightening. if you get one, play safe with it. It is unique, and I do not think Gerber's design was ever copied...probably worried about lawsuits I guess. SOG has the SwitchPlier...and that is a much safer and saner design. Just saying.

« Last Edit: March 27, 2016, 01:06:30 AM by Chako »

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Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 16,104 Little to the right...
Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #28 on: March 27, 2016, 01:57:39 AM »
Wow wow wow!!!  What a hell of a great thread!!  Thank you so much for taking the time to put this together Dan!!  I was a fantastic read!

Global Moderator Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 37,238
Re: Gerber Episodes.
« Reply #29 on: March 27, 2016, 03:05:02 AM »
 :ahhh :ahhh :ahhh Pliers of death :ahhh :ahhh :ahhh :D

These posts are great Chako :cheers: I am loving the pics and the history I am learning of Gerber :salute:


 

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