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Review of the Ruike Trekker LD41 1801

Newbie Posts: 10 instagram.com/PocketKnifeMan
Review of the Ruike Trekker LD41
« on: February 17, 2018, 06:37:58 PM »
Recently, I was looking for the perfect pocketknife for EDC. I used to carry Victorinox CyberTool 34 so far, but I wanted something bigger. Of course, I started my search from the Swiss company. I've been thinking about Outrider and Hercules for a long time. Outrider is quite cool, it has almost everything I need, except for mini-pliers. Hercules already has these pliers, but he has a wood saw, which is completely unnecessary for me. And so I was thinking about this problem for a long time....

One day I came across YouTube on a review of a pocketknife from Ruike - Trekker LD51-b. It is a model functionally comparable to Victorinox Hercules. Out of curiosity, I looked at the manufacturer's website and found the Trekker serie (114 mm pocket knives, opened with one hand with locking blade). And among the multiplicity of choice I found my holy grail: Ruike Trekker LD41-b. The LD41-b model contains everything that I need and does not have the flaws of some Victorinox. At the same time, the prices that are attractive from Swiss, and they are offering of the same quality if not higher.



What does Trekker LD41 have that which enchanted me in it? Let's start with the most striking features:

Beautifully made textured matte G10 scales with a clip! The scales are made and mounted very carefully, nothing goes anywhere, does not stick out. They are free from any writings or the producer's logo. Covers are lightly grounded around the thumb stud and near the edges, thanks to that the knife rests comfortably in the hand despite its size. The G10 itself is textured, which enhances a very good grip, and also eliminates the possibility of slipping out. Covers, as well as the whole knife, are assembled on torx screws so we can use disasembled it and clean it out. Some EDC maniacs may even mod it according to their preferences. This is not what the Swiss will provide you. The screws are also attached with a steel clip, which for years has been advising users of all kinds of penknives. Thus, we can carry a penknife attached in a pocket on a clip, which provides exceptional comfort. Unfortunately, supporters of carrying a "tip-up" must change their habits, because the clip can only be mounted in the "tip-down" position. With it attached as a Keyring (by a large K), there is also no problem. The keyring is cleverly mounted as an "additional tool", so we can take it out and hide it whenever you like. The covers contain one more element - tweezers, there is no toothpick. It has a length of almost 7 cm and is made like a full-fledged cosmetic tweezers.



What else can you notice without opening the knife? Glass breaker! So the pocket knife can be considered as type of rescue knife, so it’s another plus. Watching the pocketknife, the more observant will notice that all lainers are made of steel. The downside of this solution is the increased knife weight. The four-layer Trekker LD41 weighs some 230 g, compared with a five-layer Victorinox Hercules 200 g, a four-layer Outrider 130 g. Is it worth it? Everyone has to answer for himself.

Let's start with the blade. Ruike uses 12C27 stainless steel (Sandvik) in its products (58-59 HRC). The producer has used a thumb stud here. The blade is a typical drop-point, has a full flat grind and is finished with a mirror. On the blade, the manufacturer placed his logo and the designation of steel and model. The length of the cutting edge is about 8.5 cm, and the blade itself is much wider than the comparable 111 mm Victorinoxa blade. The blade itself is blocked by a liner-lock. The blade consists of two stages, so you do not have to worry about losing your fingertip.

Next to the blade there are mini-pliers with a wire cutter. The maximum distance between pliers is 22 mm. They work quite well, of course we can forget about harder work - it is not a "hard-work" multitool, but for anglers or home uses will be perfect. The only downside is that both arms are movable. I like when one of the arm is still mounted.

In the same layer, there is a Phillips screwdriver under the pliers. To get to it, first we have to open pliers and only then we have the opportunity to pull out a screwdriver. The screwdriver works very well. It has enough length for most screws and cross screws. He does not have a blockade, but I have never been afraid of accidental submission. The spring holds the screwdriver so good.



The next layer hides scissors with a flat cutting edge. Unlike pliers, one arm is fixed in scissors. They work perfectly, even with thicker cartons or cables.

On the other side, a reamer/awl was hidden under the scissors. And this is something new, something good. In contrast to Swiss knives (except for pioneers/soldiers), awl located in a very nice position, thanks to this treatment is more pleasant to work with. The punch has a hole through which the tool can be used as an awl in emergency situations. At its base there are two incisions. One of them (this is with an incision at an angle) is used to remove insulation from cables and works perfectly. It can handle even thicker cables, which is not possible with the Vicks. The second incision, according to the manufacturer, is the spokes wrench. I do not ride a bike, so I will not say anything about it. The punch itself is sharp, so it can also be used as a small blade for opening packages. Like a Phillips screwdriver, this tool is firmly locked with a spring, so there is no possibility that you accidentally fold your finger. However, for the same reason, be careful when opening it, one false move and we can cut your finger.

In the last layer there is a standard bottle opener, which can also be used as a 6 mm flat screwdriver. As a bottle opener, it works great. I did not happen to not deal with any bottle. There are no problems with tightening and screwing. This tool is quite solid, so we can also use it as a prybar. The bottle opener, similarly to the awl, has a hole for stripping and wire bending (max. wire diameter is 5 mm).

On the other side, instead of the can opener as usual (not available in this model), we have a belt cutter (rescue tool #2). The cutter opens at an angle of 45* and is equipped with a hellishly sharp serrated edge that easily handles all fibrous materials. The tip of this tool also performs the function of a flat 3 mm screwdriver. Honestly, I was afraid of using this screwdriver, because a strange angle with a greater force could force a sudden closing of the serrated edge on my fingers. My fears were wrong, but I would advise you to use this tool wisely as a screwdriver. Next to the belt cutter there is the key ring mentioned at the beginning.



On the other side of the knife we ​​can find the last function - a corkscrew. A typical pocketknife corkscrew, which will help us during a romantic dinner with an exquisite drink.

I must say that I am very happy with that tool. There are many references to such producers as Victorinox, Wenger, Boker, but that's good. Ruike took the best from the above he added from himself and came out very successful tool. The knife is made very well, the quality is at a high level and in this area I have nothing to cling to. A beautiful, solid and truly multi-functional pocketknife in a reasonable price.

 :like:

Sr. Member Posts: 365
Re: Review of the Ruike Trekker LD41
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2018, 06:01:49 PM »
Thanks for the review.  That is a very decent looking knife. 

John.
No Life Club Posts: 1,556
Re: Review of the Ruike Trekker LD41
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2018, 01:40:10 AM »
This seem to be some larger version of the existing Böker/ Sanrenmu lines - at least they have a whole lot in common. (My guess same designer and factory. Other Ruike product lines matches Sanrenmu smaller lines perfectly). That should be a good thing as the overall quality is very good.

How are the scissors working on this one with thin stuff like plastic and paper? That has been a weak spot on other models. (Which is kind of annoying as they are otherwise very good).
« Last Edit: February 23, 2018, 01:42:39 AM by Vidar »

"If only simple wasn't so hard" - me
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 7,909 Any tool is better than nothing. Some not by much
Re: Review of the Ruike Trekker LD41
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2018, 03:29:34 AM »
Usually, well-made tools that are meant to compete with Victorinox on an equal footing cost a lot more. Usually something like twice as much. This actually looks like a pretty good tool for the money.

I keep wondering why Victrorinox doesn't put out tools with G10 scales.  :think:

Thanks for the review!  :salute:
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Re: Review of the Ruike Trekker LD41
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2018, 05:28:43 AM »
Quality multi-tools excite me.  :like:
Newbie Posts: 10 instagram.com/PocketKnifeMan
Re: Review of the Ruike Trekker LD41
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2018, 12:09:56 PM »
(...)
How are the scissors working on this one with thin stuff like plastic and paper? That has been a weak spot on other models. (Which is kind of annoying as they are otherwise very good).

Honestly, they are perfect for me. Thanks to they size are better then Victorinox for harder work and also I didn't notice any problems with paper and thin plastic.
Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 20,604 Bored

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********* *
Re: Review of the Ruike Trekker LD41
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2018, 01:00:26 PM »
I assume you are aware that this is not Swiss made but made in China with good QC and QA. (that is why they are not that cheap :)  )

I have something similar on order and should get it soon.  As mentioned similar/same tools can be bought under the Sanrenmu SRM brand or Boker, but the thicker/larger  models are generally hard to find.

According to this site  SRM and Ruike are owned by the same company, which explains the similarity

https://trademarks.justia.com/owners/guangxi-ruike-outdoor-tools-manufacturing-co-ltd-3187461/

However, Sanrenmu seems to belong to a different company..?
https://trademarks.justia.com/owners/shenzhen-chn-technology-co-ltd-2964507/


Good review

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Al : "Women!"

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No Life Club Posts: 1,556
Re: Review of the Ruike Trekker LD41
« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2018, 01:45:00 PM »
(...)
How are the scissors working on this one with thin stuff like plastic and paper? That has been a weak spot on other models. (Which is kind of annoying as they are otherwise very good).

Honestly, they are perfect for me. Thanks to they size are better then Victorinox for harder work and also I didn't notice any problems with paper and thin plastic.

Sounds good. :) I guess it would be just fair to highlight a positive too, and the knife and steel used are certainly good and wicked sharp.

(The scissors on the two smaller versions I have are good on thick stuff and far out, but struggle with thin stuff close to the root. They are well over a 1 year old though, so much can have been changed in that time).

"If only simple wasn't so hard" - me
(Partial disclosure: I design tools for a living).
Admin Team Point Of No Return Posts: 32,160
Re: Review of the Ruike Trekker LD41
« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2018, 01:55:04 PM »
Good read an photos Mefiu. :tu: 

Try not to be the person who blunders around and causes everyone else to get out the way.  Everyone else thinks you're a utter...
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 14,596 Firm believer of Sturgeon's Law
Re: Review of the Ruike Trekker LD41
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2018, 05:28:14 PM »
I assume you are aware that this is not Swiss made but made in China with good QC and QA. (that is why they are not that cheap :)  )

I have something similar on order and should get it soon.  As mentioned similar/same tools can be bought under the Sanrenmu SRM brand or Boker, but the thicker/larger  models are generally hard to find.

According to this site  SRM and Ruike are owned by the same company, which explains the similarity

https://trademarks.justia.com/owners/guangxi-ruike-outdoor-tools-manufacturing-co-ltd-3187461/

However, Sanrenmu seems to belong to a different company..?
https://trademarks.justia.com/owners/shenzhen-chn-technology-co-ltd-2964507/


Good review

AFAIK the same big company owns Bee, ShuangRong, SanRenMu (who OEMs knives for SPyderco, Böker, Puma, SOG, Gerber, Aitor, and many other brands), OMUDA and CYMA, all different branches of that brand specialised in knives, tools, multi and steel-made gadgets

Don't quote me on that, I'm just typic what I think I remember from readings on various forums 

My toys:

MTs: Surge (2x), Skeletool CX, Rebar, Blast, Fuse, Micra, Squirt (3x), Wave, Crunch, Mini, Spirit (2x), Pro Scout, MP700 (2x), Diesel, Powerlock, PowerPlier (2x), PocketPowerPlier, Blacktip , ST6 (2x), 5WR, A100

SAKs: Bantam, Executive, Ambassador, Minichamp, Classic Alox, Champion, Farmer, Explorer, Swisschamp, Golf Tool, Wenger Champ, EVO 52, Pocket Tool Chest
Absolute Zombie Club Posts: 20,604 Bored

dks cy

********* *
Re: Review of the Ruike Trekker LD41
« Reply #10 on: February 23, 2018, 05:39:36 PM »
I (and most others) used to think that SRM was the same as Sanrenmu, just using the San Ren Mu letters but that link I posted says something different.

I actually today saw that a knife/tool I have has both markings on it
Sanrenmu also make Land knives by the way

Kelly: "Daddy, what makes men cheat on women?
Al : "Women!"

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No Life Club Posts: 1,316
Re: Review of the Ruike Trekker LD41
« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2020, 06:59:52 PM »
Ruike are the same people who make the Boker Tech Tools. The Ruike M-line is the same size as the Boker Tech Tool, but often with different tool loadouts. The larger knives are the LD designation. I have the LD51 and LD43 Rescue knife. Both are really, really awesome. The 51 has a great straight driver, the 43 has a great serrated blade and a carabiner very much like the Wenger Snap Shackle. The knives are put together with screws and easily moddable.

Charles.
No Life Club Posts: 4,826
Re: Review of the Ruike Trekker LD41
« Reply #12 on: May 29, 2020, 03:50:25 AM »
I’ve been strongly considering getting a Ruike LD-41.  I have a Boker TechTool City 7 that I like and think ks useful.
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 6,955 Born to multitask.
Re: Review of the Ruike Trekker LD41
« Reply #13 on: May 29, 2020, 04:23:22 AM »
Ruike are the same people who make the Boker Tech Tools. The Ruike M-line is the same size as the Boker Tech Tool, but often with different tool loadouts. The larger knives are the LD designation. I have the LD51 and LD43 Rescue knife. Both are really, really awesome. The 51 has a great straight driver, the 43 has a great serrated blade and a carabiner very much like the Wenger Snap Shackle. The knives are put together with screws and easily moddable.

Charles.

My LD51's pliers have some play. Do your tool's pliers have play? :think:
The main thing I do not like is no thumb-pad for using the scissors.
No Life Club Posts: 1,316
Re: Review of the Ruike Trekker LD41
« Reply #14 on: May 29, 2020, 06:30:27 AM »
Compared to a victorinox, I have a very slight amount of play. Nothing really to complain about. Tip deflection is so small as to be unmeasureable. If I hold the plier at a 45 degree angle (as if showing off the knife), the handle of the pliers will not touch the liner lock for the blade, but will touch the liner between the pliers and scissors, and overlap it ever so slightly. Just under 1mm of movement at the handle end of the pliers.

It's a simple rivet, if yours is loose, give it a couple of love taps with a ball-peen hammer.

Charles
No Life Club Posts: 1,316
Re: Review of the Ruike Trekker LD41
« Reply #15 on: May 29, 2020, 06:33:26 AM »
Note that I was able to make the scissors in the Ruike MUCH better by clamping them in a vise and tapping the blades with a hammer until they drag against each other slightly while scissoring. This enabled the blades to cut paracord with one snip. However, be careful! The backspring action on the scissors is very weak, and if you go too far you can make it so they don't open reliably anymore. Same with the rivet for the pliers. Go until you think "one more tap ought to do it", and then stop before giving it that final tap. ;)

Charles.

 

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