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Combo Edge Cooperative - partial to partially serrated blades 1866

No Life Club Posts: 3,305
Re: Combo Edge Cooperative - partial to partially serrated blades
« Reply #30 on: June 13, 2021, 06:07:34 PM »
Those are some good options SurgeUk   :cheers:

They do come in very handy for rescue, as long as you're careful in the event you're cutting clothing.  The Vic Rescue has a blunted tip which makes it safer.  For the Wingman and Gerber MP 400, it's helpful to run the edge across the material you're cutting such as a strap or seatbelt, and get the feedback in your hand as to which edge works better... often it's the serrated edge to start the cut and plain edge to finish it off.   :salute:



Absolutely EB and my first choice is the RT on my load vest and I carry the Wingman as back-up (on my duty belt)

TBH most of the rescue type scenarios we are involved in are urban/semi-rural and tend to be suicidal types (hanging) where seconds can make a difference.

Moreover, given their circumstances (strangulation etc) I need to be able to cut them down from a rope, or other type of ligature, very quickly and in that case, if possible, I need to preserve the knot for evidential purposes (without losing sight of the primary purpose of course)

I don't recall ever needing to cut a seatbelt, as we don't get called for road traffic collisions (RTCs) and equally, I've never needed to cut clothing off.

Obviously, things change and I tend to choose the type of kit specific to the call out; day/night etc. and of course terrain (not many mountains here though)  ;)
It's not a bad selection but I think I might need the Skele RX  :whistle: :facepalm: 

They don't like it up 'em!
No Life Club Posts: 2,864
Re: Combo Edge Cooperative - partial to partially serrated blades
« Reply #31 on: June 13, 2021, 07:44:19 PM »


Absolutely EB and my first choice is the RT on my load vest and I carry the Wingman as back-up (on my duty belt)

TBH most of the rescue type scenarios we are involved in are urban/semi-rural and tend to be suicidal types (hanging) where seconds can make a difference.

Moreover, given their circumstances (strangulation etc) I need to be able to cut them down from a rope, or other type of ligature, very quickly and in that case, if possible, I need to preserve the knot for evidential purposes (without losing sight of the primary purpose of course)

I don't recall ever needing to cut a seatbelt, as we don't get called for road traffic collisions (RTCs) and equally, I've never needed to cut clothing off.

Obviously, things change and I tend to choose the type of kit specific to the call out; day/night etc. and of course terrain (not many mountains here though)  ;)
It's not a bad selection but I think I might need the Skele RX  :whistle: :facepalm:

I was thinking of getting the glass breaker that comes with the Skeletool Rx and attaching it to my Skeletool Topo... just because.  The Skeletool RX has a fullly serrated blade with deep serrations - more designed for ropes, clothes, and seatbelts.  For that reason, I didn't got the the RX itself.  The glass breaker fits into the bit driver. 

Though my rescue days are in the past, I can't (don't want to) shake the mindset. My backup MT is a Gerber MP-600 with a fully serrated sheepfoot blade for .... just in case. 

A combo edge blade does give you some of that extra utility, to be able to get through various types of material. 
No Life Club Posts: 1,876
Re: Combo Edge Cooperative - partial to partially serrated blades
« Reply #32 on: June 22, 2021, 12:54:57 PM »
When I was in my teenage years, I first got interested in edged tools by way of lockbacks that had serrations on the inner half of the blade.  One of my friends would get these sorts of knives from a hardware store and would use them to within a millimeter of their limit. He would keep the plain edge razor sharp, and when he had sharpened the curved belly of the blade to a straight edge with the angles of a box cutter, he'd shelf the knife and get a new one. I envied how he could do precision work but also tear through rope and even metal tins with that knife.

This began a series of both budget and brand name locking folders that I used for EDC.. Buck and Cold Steel being my favorites.  When I switched to multiools, I rather liked having separate plain and serrated edges, starting with the Leatherman SuperTool.  Meanwhile, another friend of mine started carrying the LM PST II for basic thinks when he went away to school. I have to admit that I was a bit jealous of his PST II, if only for the fact that it didn't have that finicky locking mechanism.

...   ...   ...

The Victorinox One Handed Trekker, and the Soldier have a combo edge.  But in a twist, the serrations are on the outer two thirds - allowing for precision and leverage on the plain edge but allowing for momentum and slashing with the serrations.

...   ...   ...

All told, I think combo edges have their place.  Victorinox has done a great job with them on certain tools, especially given the reverse configuration.  The butter blade on the Vic Sprit hasn't let anyone down yet.  Leatherman seems to continue to use them on the multiools that serve in a complimentary system for outdoor recreation with the Signal, Skeletool, and several of their knife based tools. Then going back to basics... For people that need a tool just to make life easier, there's the Wingman.

When you're not filleting a fish or carving a wooden spoon... When you have a plain edge blade on one tool and you have a complimentary tool with a combo edge... Or when you just want to pack as many options into an efficient multitool or even a folding knife...  What are you carrying?

Big fan of combo blades. Left alone with only one blade, I might choose a combo, like a Spyderco Native combo.

To the discussion as to why most combo blades are serrated near the choil a d plain edge from midway to the tip, there are two very compelling reasons:

1) Skinning animals is done with the tip-end, and not accomplished well with a serrated blade.

2) If you think about the way rope is most often cut, it is doubled over, the blade placed inside the loop all the way to the hilt of the knife, and - from the choil/ hilt end - pulled from the center of your chest to one side, blade facing away.

For these reasons, serious combo edges have the serrations closer to the hand through center and plain edge  from the center to the tip.

That doesnt mean the Victorinox combo edge is bad. It's already been outlined here just how that can be of help, but that's not the way combo edges are generally designed because that's not who they were initially designed for.

And no, I do not baton with any of my knives. I have a hatchet for that, and if I dont have that, I look for smaller wood to start.

One of my favorite combo edges, which got me into combo edges and serrated edges, was the LM PST II. When I find a multi tool with individual PE and SE, I go for that, as each has its place. But if I can only have one blade, I like it to be a combo, with serrations at the hand-end.
No Life Club Posts: 2,864
Re: Combo Edge Cooperative - partial to partially serrated blades
« Reply #33 on: June 22, 2021, 01:44:04 PM »
Big fan of combo blades. Left alone with only one blade, I might choose a combo, like a Spyderco Native combo.

To the discussion as to why most combo blades are serrated near the choil a d plain edge from midway to the tip, there are two very compelling reasons:

1) Skinning animals is done with the tip-end, and not accomplished well with a serrated blade.

2) If you think about the way rope is most often cut, it is doubled over, the blade placed inside the loop all the way to the hilt of the knife, and - from the choil/ hilt end - pulled from the center of your chest to one side, blade facing away.

For these reasons, serious combo edges have the serrations closer to the hand through center and plain edge  from the center to the tip.

That doesnt mean the Victorinox combo edge is bad. It's already been outlined here just how that can be of help, but that's not the way combo edges are generally designed because that's not who they were initially designed for.

And no, I do not baton with any of my knives. I have a hatchet for that, and if I dont have that, I look for smaller wood to start.

One of my favorite combo edges, which got me into combo edges and serrated edges, was the LM PST II. When I find a multi tool with individual PE and SE, I go for that, as each has its place. But if I can only have one blade, I like it to be a combo, with serrations at the hand-end.

 :hatsoff:

to your point... some hunting/bushcraft type knives like the Esee come with combo edge options. 
No Life Club Posts: 2,090
Re: Combo Edge Cooperative - partial to partially serrated blades
« Reply #34 on: June 24, 2021, 04:15:20 AM »
To the discussion as to why most combo blades are serrated near the choil a d plain edge from midway to the tip, there are two very compelling reasons:

1) Skinning animals is done with the tip-end, and not accomplished well with a serrated blade.

2) If you think about the way rope is most often cut, it is doubled over, the blade placed inside the loop all the way to the hilt of the knife, and - from the choil/ hilt end - pulled from the center of your chest to one side, blade facing away.

For these reasons, serious combo edges have the serrations closer to the hand through center and plain edge  from the center to the tip.

 :tu:
No Life Club Posts: 3,305
Re: Combo Edge Cooperative - partial to partially serrated blades
« Reply #35 on: July 01, 2021, 08:18:36 PM »
The serrations were not required in the making of "Chicken Ding" for Mrs Surge  ;)

They don't like it up 'em!
No Life Club Posts: 2,864
Re: Combo Edge Cooperative - partial to partially serrated blades
« Reply #36 on: July 01, 2021, 08:40:56 PM »
The serrations were not required in the making of "Chicken Ding" for Mrs Surge  ;)

 :like:
No Life Club Posts: 2,864
Re: Combo Edge Cooperative - partial to partially serrated blades
« Reply #37 on: July 17, 2021, 01:43:58 AM »
https://forum.multitool.org/index.php/topic,87756.0.html

I started a thread for the Combo Edge Challenge for next February

 :pok:
No Life Club Posts: 3,305
Re: Combo Edge Cooperative - partial to partially serrated blades
« Reply #38 on: July 18, 2021, 09:30:49 PM »
https://forum.multitool.org/index.php/topic,87756.0.html

I started a thread for the Combo Edge Challenge for next February

 :pok:
Joined  :tu:

They don't like it up 'em!
No Life Club Posts: 2,864
Re: Combo Edge Cooperative - partial to partially serrated blades
« Reply #39 on: August 14, 2021, 05:22:54 PM »
Went out for a camping trip with some pals. 

One of them brought this knife along (or something similar).  Being a user but not a knife-knut like me, both his fixed blade and the folder in his pocket have a serrated portion at the base of the blade.  He's had this for many years, and the folder has been in his pocket for who-knows-how-long.  He's never had any complaints with either.  He keeps the pain edge sharp (the sheath has a honing rod on it that is small enough to fit the serrations too).  He used the serrated edges for some paracord this time around... no trouble at all.  The fixed blade did a bit of batoning, just being careful to use the middle of the length of blade. 

 

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