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Can Opener Comparison 4439

Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #60 on: August 09, 2018, 10:27:47 AM »
Victorinox Fireman (liner-lock)
Like others before it, this lost a point to slipping. Also, I discovered that the cans I used had a feature which interfered with my quarter-circle technique that I had not fully anticipated. The cans have a paper label, that may get in the way of the hook. Not a whole lot, but enough to allow the hook to slip off. This was not an issue with claws, which you have to pull backwards on the rim. With the quarter-circles being pushed forward, and watching closely, some interesting events took place. Sometimes the hook pushed against the paper label, fold the label, creating a tiny ramp that facilitated the slippage. In other cases the hook ripped the label if the label extended over the rim, giving in to the force and slipping off. A few times the hook was simply unable to fold/tear the label enough to move forward, so I had to unhook the whole thing and re-adjust it to move forward.
When the label was not such a drama queen I managed to cut through the lid with ease, without slipping off or anything.

2 points for punching through.
2 for comfort.
2 for not jamming.
2 for cutting.
2 for not slipping.
Total: 10



Victorinox OHO Trekker (liner-lock)
As above, minus a point for the blade spine protruding from the frame.

2 points for punching through.
1 for comfort.
2 for not jamming.
2 for cutting.
2 for not slipping.
Total: 9
« Last Edit: August 09, 2018, 10:40:32 AM by ReamerPunch »

Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #61 on: August 09, 2018, 10:38:14 AM »
Victorinox Farmer
The same yet again. I can cut consistently, and having the label get in the way should not be considered enough to warrant deducting a point. Also this is great in the hand.

2 points for punching through.
2 for comfort.
2 for not jamming.
2 for cutting.
2 for not slipping.
Total: 10



Victorinox Sportsman
Having tested the Cadet, and witnessing one of the best can openers so far, I was curious whether a cellidor 84mm model could perform equally. It did. This is the same design of can opener as the larger models, but slightly smaller. The Cadet is thinner than this, but I found that the blade dug into my palm more with the Sportsman. Your experiences may vary with these small knives, but their can openers are superb. I will give the Sportsman the full 2 points for comfort, since its blade is small and while it does protrude, it is also small and not that uncomfortable.

2 points for punching through.
2 for comfort.
2 for not jamming.
2 for cutting.
2 for not slipping.
Total: 10
Sr. Member Posts: 389
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #62 on: August 15, 2018, 11:28:06 AM »
Wow! Comprehensive. :salute:

I always use a Vic SAK can opener wherever I need a can opened. Once the technique is mastered (doesn't take long) you can do a quick clean job and will trust no others. 8)


Rambler
Newbie Posts: 33 Custom & Modular
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #63 on: August 17, 2018, 12:02:20 AM »
Amazing write-up! Thank you for taking the time to organize, plan, and test all of these!

Do any of you have a general preference for the blade facing inward or outward of the hook?

Gentlemen of All Trades
www.GOAT.tools
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #64 on: August 17, 2018, 09:34:11 AM »
Wow! Comprehensive. :salute:

I always use a Vic SAK can opener wherever I need a can opened. Once the technique is mastered (doesn't take long) you can do a quick clean job and will trust no others. 8)

Thanks!  :tu:
Yes, Victorinox makes some mean openers. Which is why so many companies have adopted the quarter-circle. But the Vics are the sharpest around.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2018, 09:40:33 AM by ReamerPunch »

Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #65 on: August 17, 2018, 09:39:26 AM »
Amazing write-up! Thank you for taking the time to organize, plan, and test all of these!

Do any of you have a general preference for the blade facing inward or outward of the hook?

Thanks and welcome to the forum!  :cheers:

As I have said, I personally prefer going backwards, with a claw. With a Leatherman, there is no learning curve. I bet I could do it with my eyes closed.

But there's a lot of people who prefer a quarter-circle, and go forward.
As long as it's a good tool, with a good can opener, it'll work.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2018, 09:40:49 AM by ReamerPunch »

Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #66 on: August 19, 2018, 06:49:05 AM »
Do we have any left-handed members here?  :think:

If you are left-handed, a few questions.
1. Have you ever opened a can with a multi-tool/sak? Did you use your right hand? Was it awkward but doable?
2. Maybe you have a Leatherman and a SAK, and a can. What would easier to use with your right hand?
3. Maybe you also have a BuckTool. Its can opener is at a better position to be used left-handed. How would that compare to using a Leatherman claw with your right hand?
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #67 on: August 19, 2018, 01:26:21 PM »
Having re-tested a few models, discovered a few things, and improved my technique, I have decided to give the lowest scoring ones another chance.
Also, I will go through a whole can, instead of just a portion. That will be a little more realistic, and hopefully provide more accurate results.

I have gone through whole cans with Victorinox and Leatherman models, and there is not doubt in my mind that you will be able to open a can with them. Realistically, losing a point for comfort, jamming, or slipping off the rim makes little difference. The main thing is cutting, and to a lesser extent, piercing. Having nice, rounded handles and not jamming at all means little, when you cannot cut through the can lid, or if you make jagged, messy cuts or even metal shavings that may end up in your food.

For the Charge, say, losing a point to comfort is insignificant. You will get a great cut, no sharp edges or shrapnel, and the tiny amount of discomfort from its protruding blade spine will be forgotten within seconds. Even if you slip with the Victorinox Spirit, it makes no difference. You'll get a nice, clean cut, thanks to its great edge, which also allow you to continue on the same cut.
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #68 on: August 19, 2018, 01:29:41 PM »
Coast Pocket Pliers
Having greatly improved with quarter-circles, I started with the Coast LED Pocket Pliers. In its initial testing, it only scored two for comfort and another two for not jamming. Pretty terrible.
Having gone through a whole can with it, it remains terrible.

It did not jam at all, and this time, it did not slip either.

Cutting was difficult. It started fine, but I quickly noticed how blunt the blade is. Instead of cutting right next to the rim, every now and then the edge slid away a little before cutting, messing up the angle of the cut. It is so blunt that I could not just power through the messed up cut and continue. I had to abandon the cut that strayed away, and start a new cut after it. When the edge diverged from its route, sliding away from the rim, it bent the tiny part between the two cuts, making it impossible to cut. Pushing the can opener edge against the tiny uncut part resulted in breaking it, whereas a sharp quarter-circle would have gone straight through it. 

As for comfort, it got only one point in this test, compared to the two it got in the first test. Going through the whole can with a can opener this blunt is very awkward and unpleasant. The handles are nicely rounded off, but due to its blunt edge, I had to exert considerable force to cut, and by the time I was done, my thumb and hand were not at all happy about it.

At least, it did not create a mess or steel shavings that would end up in my food.

In conclusion, it is pretty bad. Why you would have only this with you is beyond me, but even so, you'd eventually open the can. Go slow, be mindful of where the edge is going, and be patient.

0 points for punching through.
1 for comfort.
2 for not jamming.
0 for cutting.
2 for not slipping.
Total: 5

« Last Edit: August 19, 2018, 01:32:32 PM by ReamerPunch »

Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #69 on: August 24, 2018, 04:53:10 PM »
Buck BuckTool 360
Original attempt
Show content
BuckTool
Barely able to hook onto the rim, due to bad placement. It was a chore to keep it on the rim, and impossible to cut consistently. Very jagged cut, creating burrs and sharp edges.
I might as well have used a blade, Phillips, or flathead, with arguably better results. At least it locks, so no jamming.

1 point for punching through.
0 for comfort.
2 for not jamming.
0 for cutting.
0 for not slipping.
Total: 3


Left-handed
Show content
BuckTool (left-handed)
Seeing how badly they placed the can opener on this, it almost looks like a left-handed can opener. Having used it right-handed, with terrible results, I thought I'd try left-handed.
A bit awkward to use the non-dominant hand, but it worked. Despite the awkwardness, slipping, jamming, and ghost cuts, it eventually worked, and much better than with my right hand.

2 points for punching through. It hooks better onto the rim, since it is more to the right of the handle than to the left.
1 for comfort. The handles are nicely rounded, but then again, so is a pencil. It does not mean I can write with my left hand.
1 for not jamming. The nail-nick kept getting caught on the remnants of the edge on the wall of the can.
1 for cutting. Not every push yielded a cut. It kept slipping and jamming, delaying an already frustrating process.
1 for not slipping.
Total: 6


Right-handed, left side
I tried using it with my right hand (dominant hand), but going backwards anti-clockwise, since the positioning of the can opener seems to favor that side.


I intended to go full circle, but it could not be done.
First of all, I had to unfold the bottom handle, because when closed it prevented the hook from grabbing the rim.
Every other cut, I slipped off the rim, banging my finger on the can.
Most motions did not yield a cut. Instead of following a previous cut, the can opener just slid against the cut and did nothing but frustrate me.
When I did manage to make a cut, the can opener was prone to jamming, and it was relatively easy to retrieve only due to it being locking.

1 point for punching through.
0 for comfort.
0 for not jamming.
0 for cutting.
0 for not slipping.
Total: 1
« Last Edit: August 24, 2018, 06:22:53 PM by ReamerPunch »

Just Bananas Posts: 66,447
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #70 on: August 24, 2018, 05:31:32 PM »
Excellent testing RP :popcorn: :like: :like:

fail to prepare prepare to fail
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #71 on: August 24, 2018, 05:36:37 PM »
BuckTool

Left-handed - Second attempt
Using the BuckTool with the right hand but on the left-handed side of the can was deeply unpleasant. Considering that the can opener placement favors the left-hand, I decided to once again shed the shackles of convention and instinct, and use it left-handed, on the left side.


Near the end, the rim bent (where the can opener is pointing), and the hook was unable to stay put.


With some effort I managed to continue the cut.


Look at the filings it created. Imagine those ending up in your food. Imagine how many did not stick on the can opener.


The lid edge was extremely jagged at the end.


Using your non-dominant hand is awkward, to say the least. I also had to open one handle, in order to get the hook to actually hook on the rim. The can opener kept jamming, and slipping off, and some pushes did not result in a cut. Even when they did, the cut is messy, with sharp points and jagged edges, plus sharp metal filings that will certainly take their toll.

Will you manage to open the can? Yes, eventually. I would not consume any edibles out of it, though.
I may revisit the marvelous BuckTool can opener in the future, but I will keep my expectations low.

1 point for punching through.
0 for comfort.
1 for not jamming.
0 for cutting.
0 for not slipping.
Total: 2

It is a shame the BuckTool was discontinued so long ago. I wish I had the chance to visit the Buck booth at Shot Show, hand them a BuckTool and a can, ask for a demonstration, and watch as they mangled the can. It is astonishing how a top brand multi-tool got the can opener so wrong. Did no one test it? Is that not part of the development of a tool? Did it not occur to anyone that maybe it should be tested before approval? And keep in mind that the PST got a perfect 10. Now that's a can opener.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2018, 06:23:19 PM by ReamerPunch »

Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #72 on: August 24, 2018, 05:50:21 PM »
Excellent testing RP :popcorn: :like: :like:

Thanks!  :cheers:

You know what? I'll try the BuckTool once more, going full circle on the can, right-handed, on the right side, as "intended" :rofl:
I hope when I'm done I have all my fingers.

Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #73 on: August 28, 2018, 03:02:40 PM »
BuckTool
right-handed (whole can)

I have gotten a lot of mileage out of this can opener. Not in a good way, admittedly.
This time, I tried it "properly". That is, right-handed, on the right side of the can, going clock-wise, full circle on a can.
One handle had to be unfolded for better positioning on the can, as the can opener barely hooks on the rim.

Having the can opener this far to the right in the handle throws off the orientation of the cutting edge. Instead of following the curvature of the rim, the BuckTool can opener cuts at the wrong angle, making it very difficult to continue on a previous cut. It quickly created metal filings that did not look particularly appetizing.


The hook is supposed to provide leverage when pushing the edge against the lid. In this case, the leverage was far less compared to other can openers. To compensate and actually manage to cut, I had to exert a lot of force, making my hand hurt, in addition to constantly slipping off the can. At least it did not jam.
Three fourths of the way, and I am not pleased, to say the least. Lots of shrapnel, constant slipping, a sore hand, and a very frustrating journey along the lid, as I had to almost fight the can opener to get it to follow a previous cut.


Near the end, the lid will be pushed into your food as you try to cut. This never happened with the good can openers. A Leatherman claw or a Victorinox quarter-circle would have kept cutting easily, without pushing the lid inwards. The BuckTool will, and probably get even more metal filings in there in the process.


The end result was a sore hand, a lot of sharp metal filings, and a very jagged edge.


He doesn't look happy about it either.


This is not the can opener you are looking for.


I would highly recommend using something else to open a can. It is not just a matter of ease of use. If you open a can with this, consuming the food will be dangerous.
I am amazed at how badly this performed. How on Earth did Buck not recall these within a week of release?


1 point for punching through.
0 for comfort.
2 for not jamming.
-10 for cutting.
0 for not slipping.
Total: -7
« Last Edit: August 28, 2018, 05:35:23 PM by ReamerPunch »

Zombie Apprentice Posts: 14,515

Nix us

******** * *
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #74 on: August 28, 2018, 04:33:00 PM »
 :facepalm:
Global Moderator Zombie Apprentice Posts: 19,551
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #75 on: August 28, 2018, 04:54:11 PM »
Very well done.   :salute:

I am a fan of the Victorinox can opener and use them often enough.  Some cans do have the pull tab but a good many dont.  I like the forward style vs Wenger style opening.   Its probably familiarity.  I must have tried the LM opener but nothing negative or positive comes to mind.  I am certainly happier using the Vic opener for now.   

Esse Quam Videri
Global Moderator Zombie Apprentice Posts: 19,551
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #76 on: August 28, 2018, 04:54:39 PM »
That Buck tool annihilated that can.  WOW. 

Esse Quam Videri
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #77 on: August 30, 2018, 06:05:57 PM »
Schrade USA Tough Tool

Original attempt
Show content
Schrade USA Tough Tool
One handle has to be unfolded, otherwise it is impossible to use. It kept jamming and folding. Very poor cutting as well.

2 points for punching through.
1 for comfort.
0 for not jamming.
0 for cutting.
1 for not slipping.
Total: 4



Second attempt (whole can):

Opening an entire can with this was a very different experience than doing the few cuts I did in the original test.
Going full circle with this was not particularly pleasant. Very doable, but not something I'd look forward to, now that I've done it.
The edge is extremely blunt, with an almost non-existent bevel. Also, due to the implements opening the way they do, one handle has to be unfolded in order to use the can opener.


With one handle open, you are left with the weight of the other handle hanging out of the back or your palm. On almost all other can openers, the entire multi-tool will be in your hand, with only the can opener protruding. On the Tough Tool, this arrangement of handles creates an awkward counter-weight, working against you until the can is opened. In addition to this, the handle you will have to hold on is not the standard straight handle of a multi-tool, but a weird one, with many hotspots.


Holding the other handle for an extended reach eliminated the awkward imbalance, but having the can opener so far away from your grip sacrifices too much control, which is very much needed for a can opener this blunt.


Near the end the lid will be pushed inwards. Not a surprise given how blunt the claw edge is.


The edge is so blunt that additional force is required in order to get it to actually cut. I would either support the can opener spine with my thumb, which was painful, or just rest my thumb below the can opener, on the flat, wide handle. No issues with my thumb there, but my pinky was pressing against the pivot area of the handle, which has quite thin edges.


Cutting was as poor as expected. An unsightly combination of pushing and bending the lid, it created many sharp points and edges, rolling the lid here and there.


About half the edge of this claw is usable. Thanks to the claw's slight taper, the first half of the edge, though blunt, is thin, and able to pierce and cut somewhat effectively. Going beyond that, the edge is so wide that it does not cut, and requires a lot of force to bend the lid. I found it easier to just do half-length cuts, and spare my hand the pain.


Often, instead of the hook providing leverage to the claw, and have the claw cut, the opposite happened. The claw is so blunt that it provided enough leverage for the hook to slip off the rim.


I do not know if I would recommend this one. It will get the job done eventually, though the process will be unpleasant and the result inelegant.


Interestingly, this time the claw did not get stuck in the lid, like in my original testing. So there's that.

1 point for punching through.
0 for comfort.
2 for not jamming.
0 for cutting.
1 for not slipping.
Total: 4
« Last Edit: August 30, 2018, 07:24:57 PM by ReamerPunch »

Just Bananas Posts: 66,447
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #78 on: August 30, 2018, 06:31:18 PM »
That looks a nasty cut on that can I
wonder if any metal bits fell in the can :think:

fail to prepare prepare to fail
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #79 on: September 01, 2018, 09:36:06 AM »
Leatherman Wave (New Gen and Plus)

This is the standard locking Leatherman claw, also found in the Surge, Charge, Rebar etc. Pierced the lid like a pro, and cut beautifully, leaving nice, smooth edges behind, with absolutely no jamming or slipping. A point had to be deducted due to the blade spines protruding a little. Realistically it makes no  difference, but then again, there are other tools, like the Rebar, which feel even better in hand. Still, the Wave felt somewhat better in hand than the Charge, probably due to the Charge being slightly thicker.

2 point for punching through.
1 for comfort.
2 for not jamming.
2 for cutting.
2 for not slipping.
Total: 9
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #80 on: September 01, 2018, 09:42:46 AM »
That looks a nasty cut on that can I
wonder if any metal bits fell in the can :think:

Seemingly not, but I can see it happening. I am a little concerned that my ToughTool had an unfinished can opener edge. There is almost no bevel to it at all.  :think:

Not as bad as the BuckTool, though. I wonder how many people have opened a can with it. Surely there are others.
If anyone has a BuckTool and a can laying around, I'd be delighted to compare notes. But don't eat the shrapnel.  :facepalm:
Zombie Apprentice Posts: 14,515

Nix us

******** * *
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #81 on: September 01, 2018, 02:58:17 PM »
You made that cut look quite expert. I'm impressed by the even and smooth cuts. 
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #82 on: September 01, 2018, 03:49:41 PM »
You made that cut look quite expert. I'm impressed by the even and smooth cuts.

 :hatsoff:
I was not trying to make a nice cut. That was just rocking the multi-tool up and down, and spinning the can. Very natural movements, and I did not have to compensate for, or adjust to anything, like weird balance, awkward grip, slipping, going off kilter.
That's just how the Leatherman claw performs. Every tool that has that can opener, Rebar, Signal, Surge, Charge, etc, they'll all do a fantastic job.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2018, 05:25:01 PM by ReamerPunch »

Just Bananas Posts: 66,447
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #83 on: September 01, 2018, 03:53:57 PM »
You are becoming the can opener expert RP :like: :tu:

fail to prepare prepare to fail
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #84 on: September 01, 2018, 04:00:03 PM »
Very well done.   :salute:

I am a fan of the Victorinox can opener and use them often enough.  Some cans do have the pull tab but a good many dont.  I like the forward style vs Wenger style opening.   Its probably familiarity.  I must have tried the LM opener but nothing negative or positive comes to mind.  I am certainly happier using the Vic opener for now.

I liked how easy the process was with the Cadet. Once I managed not to slip, Victorinox was just as good. I can't say I am used to one or the other, so for me it comes down to ease of use. Leatherman and Vic, both are great. I tested the Coast quarter-circle, and it did not go well. I'll test the Gerber on an entire can.

I do like the claw a little more. There is no learning curce with a Leatherman claw, which is why I like it the most. Wenger claws were also great once I identified the technique quirk. The Schrade kinda worked. I also liked the Bear and Son one, so I'll open a whole can with that one too. And the Ganzo. The BuckTool, well, that's in a league of its own.

I'll also revisit the Juice, Safari Hunter, and Bantam. I am a bit curious if the combo tools will hold their own.
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #85 on: September 09, 2018, 09:53:40 AM »
Another try with the Wave.
I thought I'd eliminate one blade spine digging into my fingers, by opening one handle. This configuration brings the inside edges of the handle against your fingers. Although quite comfortable, this means that you will be holding on half the tool.
I have large size hands, and I found that having only one handle in my palm while opening the can was not preferable. Instead, having both handles folded up fills my palm better, giving me a better grip, causing less fatigue, and providing better control of the tool. Holding on one handle might be better for smaller hands.
Also, if you only hold onto one handle, the other will hang through the back of your hand. Of course, these are afterthoughts, as the can opener is a great performer. The process will be easy and consistent, with a clean cut, so whichever way you end up holding the tool is up to personal preference.

Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #86 on: November 28, 2018, 05:39:35 PM »
Juice CS4

Original attempt
Show content
Juice
0 points for punching through. The piercing point is blunt and not at the best angle to punch through.
1 for comfort. The edges dig into my hands, and so does the corkscrew. This is the old design, so maybe now it's better?
2 for not jamming.
2 for cutting.
2 for not slipping.
Total: 7
(Image removed from quote.)


Entire can
Going full circle on a can was a similar experience to the original attempt. The edge has no bevel, making the piercing point blunt. It might have performed better if the point met the can lid at a better angle, but as it is, piercing through takes a significant amount of force, compared to a sharpened claw or quarter-circle.
Going full circle made even more evident how average the ergonomics are. The corkscrew reminded me of SOG gears digging into my hand, and though not as bad, it was more uncomfortable than the Wave/Charge blade spine.
Compared to the original attempt, it lost a point for cutting. That is mainly because it does not exactly cut. With a sharpened can opener, be it a Leatherman claw or a Victorinox quarter-circle, you can feel the edge cutting through the lid. The Juice's blunt edge just pushes the lid downwards, and being rigid, the lid just tears along the previous 'cut'. However, it is quite effective, thanks to the great hook which holds onto the rim, and the edge being at a good position to trace around the lid. If it were sharper, it would have been better, but it still works. Also it left a sharp edge behind, both on the can and on the lid. No surprises there, considering the lid was essentially broken off instead of cut.
Absolutely no slipping or jamming as well.

0 points for punching through.
1 for comfort.
2 for not jamming.
1 for cutting.
2 for not slipping.
Total: 6





« Last Edit: November 28, 2018, 05:58:56 PM by ReamerPunch »

Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #87 on: January 28, 2019, 07:49:10 AM »
So now that Leatherman has a quarter-circle, all big four brands have a quarter-circle.
I do not know how I feel about this.  :think:
The standard LM claw is excellent, why did they go with the quarter-circle for the Free series?

No Life Club Posts: 1,221
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #88 on: January 28, 2019, 12:04:20 PM »
Well, you can free space on your Zombie Survival Kit and not include a can opener or use an MT or SAK without one. Because: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lhT7VNRFkx4

Nobody needs a can opener when you have pavements!  :viking:
Thread Killer 2017 Absolutely No Life Club Posts: 5,959 Born to multitask.
Re: Can Opener Comparison
« Reply #89 on: January 28, 2019, 12:18:54 PM »
 :think:
Is the food safe to eat after all that grinding?

 

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